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Style Guide

 

This guide covers all university publications-printed, copied, and electronic. For style issues not covered in this handbook, the Associated Press Stylebook will be the guiding style guide.

 

Usage

I. University Identification

1.1 Clarion University

"Clarion University" is the proper identification for use in headings. "Clarion University of Pennsylvania" must be used in first references within the text of publications, advertisements, and news stories. "Clarion University," "Clarion," "CU" (without periods), or "the university" (with a lower case u) should be the only alternate identifications for subsequent references.


1.2 Campus Designations

The official designations for the two campuses are Clarion campus and Clarion University—Venango College. The Pittsburgh location at West Penn Hospital is known as the Pittsburgh Site. On first reference, refer to Clarion University—Venango College. On subsequent references, refer to Venango College.


1.3 Office Listings

The current Campus Directory contains the official names of campus offices. Refer to academic departments within text as Art Department, Biology Department, Chemistry Department, etc. Formal references on letterheads and return addresses should be Department of English, Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Earth Science, etc.

See Appendix A for a complete listing of academic departments.


1.4 Miscellaneous Usage

See Appendix C.

 



2. Titles and Addresses

2.1 Titles, General

Use complete, accurate titles of campus buildings, people, positions, and official units in first references. Subsequent references may be informal. The Campus Directory is the most current source of titles of individuals. For official names and abbreviations of buildings and facilities, see Appendix B. Campus Facilities.

Example:

The dance group performed in Marwick-Boyd Auditorium.

A festive Madrigal Dinner is scheduled for December in Clarion University's

Eagle Commons Dining Hall. For the occasion, Eagle Commons will be decorated in medieval style.


2.2 Titles and Names of Individuals

In general, refer to the chief administrator of an academic department as the department chair and the chief administrator of a non-academic unit as the director.

Example:

Dr. Andrea Miller is chair of the Library Sciences Department.

He is president of Student Senate.

Refer to individuals in first textual references by first and last name and title, if applicable. Subsequent references are by last name only.

Example:

Dr. Dennis Hetrick, chair of the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department, spoke to the national organization last Wednesday. Hetrick will speak at the international meeting in Quebec next March.

Use individuals' names in short-term publications only. For flyers and other publications that will be used for more than one year, substitute a position or title for the person's name. (Graduate faculty may be named in graduate program flyers, if applicable.)

Examples:

Write the chair of the History Department for more information.

Be sure to send your application to the director of financial aid before the deadline.


2.3 Campus Addresses

For off-campus mailings, use the following order for return addresses, with the campus mailing address on the next to last line.

Example:

College of Education and Human Services
Clarion University of Pennsylvania
840 Wood Street
Clarion, PA 16214-1232

Use the room number followed by the building name for campus mail addresses.

Examples:

334 Still Hall

120 Davis Hall (not Room 120 Davis or Davis Hall Room 120)

(See 15. Mailing regulations.)


2.4 Degrees

Use lower case for general references to degrees, i.e. , an associate degree; a bachelor's degree or a baccalaureate degree; a doctorate or a doctoral degree. Capitalize degrees when they are designated by their full and proper names.

Examples:

The Music Department offers a Bachelor of Music in music marketing.

An unusually large number of candidates received associate and master's degrees at Summer Commencement.

A newcomer to the campus in August 1996, she is completing a doctorate in mathematics.


For a complete list of Clarion University degrees and their abbreviations, see 3.2 Degrees.


2.5 Titles of Works Cited

Italicize the following:

art works (Michelangelo's Pieta)

books (Beloved by Toni Morrison)

long musical compositions (Mahler's Ninth Symphony)

long poems published separately (T.S. Elliot's The Waste Land)

motion pictures (Dead Man Walking)

pamphlets (A University Handbook on Disabilities)

plays (Ibsen's Ghosts)

periodicals (Undergraduate Catalog)

poetry collections (Walt Whitman's Leaves of Grass)

gallery exhibition names

music albums/CDs

 

Use quotation marks with the following:

songs as part of an album

unpublished papers/documents

TV programs

lectures

radio programs

chapter parts/sections

poems

opera

story titles

short musical compositions


3. Abbreviations

Any time there is a possibility your reader will not understand an abbreviation, spell out the full expression the first time and follow it with the abbreviation in parenthesis. Then you may abbreviate in subsequent references.

Example:

A scholarship for junior communication majors requires a minimum quality-point average (QPA) of 3.4. Several applicants earned a 3.8 QPA.

Abbreviate United States when used as a adjective, otherwise, spell it out when used as a noun.

Example:

The U.S. navy

She is resident of the United States.


3.1 Clarion University

Always write CU with no periods, set solid. The first reference in the text of a publication should be to "Clarion University of Pennsylvania." For successive informal references, use "Clarion University," "CU," "Clarion," or "the university."

DO NOT use the acronym CUP


3.2 Degrees

Abbreviations for Clarion University degrees are as follows:

A.A.

A.S.

A.S.N.

B.A.

B.F.A.

B.M.

B.S.

B.S.B.A.

B.S.Ed.

B.S.N.

M.A.

M.B.A.

M.Ed.

M.S.

M.S.L.S.

M.S.N.

Associate of Arts

Associate of Science

Associate of Science in Nursing

Bachelor of Arts

Bachelor of Fine Arts

Bachelor of Music

Bachelor of Science

Bachelor of Science in Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Education

Bachelor of Science in Nursing

Master of Arts

Master of Business Administration

Master of Education

Master of Science

Master of Science in Library Science

Master of Science in Nursing

 

Examples:

... received her B.S. in speech pathology.

... received a Bachelor of Science in Education degree.

... received her bachelor's (master's, associate's) degree.

 

3.3 Campus Facilities

Use abbreviations for campus facilities only when your readers will recognize them, or provide a key.


3.4 Upper-Case Abbreviations

Abbreviations of organizations and other functions are set in full caps without periods

Example:

AACTE, MASCS, NCATE, QPA, ALA, NLN, OIP, PO Box 113


3.5 Lower-Case Abbreviations

Use periods with lower-case abbreviations.

Example:

a.m., p.m., m.p.h., c.o.d.


3.6 Names of States

When they stand alone, spell out states' names, except in tables or other close-set material. For the names of states in text, use standard abbreviations as listed here.Postal service abbreviations for states are used only in addresses.

 

State

Abbreviation
in Text

Postal Service
Abbreviation

Alabama

Ala.

AL

Alaska

Alaska

AK

Arizona

Ariz.

AZ

Arkansas

Ark.

AR

California

Calif.

CA

Colorado

Colo.

CO

Connecticut

Conn.

CT

Delaware

Del.

DE

District of Columbia

D.C.

DC

Florida

Fla.

FL

Georgia

Ga.

GA

Hawaii

Haw.

HI

Idaho

Ida.

ID

Illinois

Ill.

IL

Indiana

Ind.

IN

Iowa

Iowa

IA

Kansas

Kan.

KS

Kentucky

Ky.

KY

Louisiana

La.

LA

Maine

Me.

ME

Maryland

Md.

MD

Massachusetts

Mass.

MA

Michigan

Mich.

MI

Minnesota

Minn.

MN

Mississippi

Miss.

MS

Missouri

Mo.

MO

Montana

Mont.

MT

Nebraska

Neb.

NE

Nevada

Nev.

NV

New Hampshire

N.H.

NH

New Jersey

N.J.

NJ

New Mexico

N.M.

NM

New York

N.Y.

NY

North Carolina

N.C.

NC

North Dakota

N.D.

ND

Ohio

Ohio

OH

Oklahoma

Okla.

OK

Oregon

Ore.

OR

Pennsylvania

Pa.

PA

Rhode Island

R.I.

RI

South Carolina

S.C.

SC

South Dakota

S.D.

SD

Tennessee

Tenn.

TN

Texas

Texas

TX

Utah

Utah

UT

Vermont

Vt.

VT

Virginia

Va.

VA

Washington

Wash.

WA

West Virginia

W.Va.

WV

Wisconsin

Wis.

WI

Wyoming

Wyo.

WY

 

3.7 Professional Titles


Spell out the titles of individuals. Titles appearing in front of a name are capitalized.

Example:

Vice President for Student and University Affairs Harry E. Tripp

Harry E. Tripp is the university's vice president for student and university affairs.

Professor Benjamin Freed is department chair.

Dr. Ben Freed, department chair, holds the rank of professor.

(See also 2. Titles and addresses.)


3.8 Time of Day

Use a.m. and p.m. when referring to the time of day.

Example:

10 a.m., 10:30 p.m.

Use noon and midnight, not 12 a.m. or 12 p.m.

(See 6. Numbers. 6.2 Time of Day.)


3.9 Course Titles and Prefixes

On campus, a standard set of abbreviations is used for call numbers and course prefixes with course names in class schedules, catalogs, and other publications. They are always written in full caps without periods. Also, see course catalogs.


Example:

CHEM 257 Organic Chemistry

 

AS
ACTG
ANTH
ART
BIOL
BSAD
CHEM
CIS
COMM
COOP
CSD
ECH
ECON
ED
ELED
ENG
ENVR
ES
FIN
FR
GS
GEOG
GER
HIST
HON
HPE
HUM
LS
MATH
MGMT
MKTG
MT
MUS
NURS         
OFMT
OT
PH
PHIL
PHSC
PS
PSY
RE
REHB
SCED
SC
SOC
SPAN
SPED
SW
THE
WS

Academic Skills
Accounting
Anthropology
Art
Biology
Business Administration
Chemistry
Computer Information Science
Communication
Cooperative Programs (coops/internships)
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Early Childhood Education
Economics
Education
Elementary Education
English
Environmental Studies
Earth Science
Finance
French
General Studies
Geography
German
History
Honors
Health and Physical Education
Humanities
Library Science
Mathematics
Management
Marketing
Medical Technology
Music
Nursing
Office Management
Occupational Therapy
Physics
Philosophy
Physical Science
Political Science
Psychology
Real Estate
Rehabilitative Science
Science Education
Speech Communication
Sociology
Spanish
Special Education
Social Work
Theatre
Women's Studies

 



4 Capitalization

4.1 Professional Titles or Positions

Capitalize a position or title only when used before a person's name. Use lower case for titles in all other cases.

Example: Titles before names

Dean of Admissions William Bailey

Professor Elisabeth Donato


Example: Titles following names

Rachelle Prioleau, dean of the College of Arts and Sciences, spoke in favor of the curriculum change.


Example: Titles without names

The dean of the College of Arts and Sciences spoke in favor of the curriculum change.

The director of security coordinated a substance abuse seminar attended by residence hall and security personnel.


4.2 Titles of Campus-related Organizations

Capitalize all complete (formal) titles of campus-related organizations. Use lower case for fragmentary references after the specific identity of a group has been established.

Examples:

Agencies (Small Business Development Center)

Boards (Board of Governors)

Colleges (College of Business Administration)

Councils (Council of Trustees)

Departments (Department of Education)

Institutions (Cheyney University)

Offices (Financial Aid Office)

Organizations (University Activities Board)

Programs (The Clarion Call)

Schools (School of Nursing)


Fragmentary references

Examples:

Clarion University has scheduled an open house on November 11 for prospective students. A university spokesperson said that four open houses are scheduled for Fall Semester.

The department has voted to give full support to the Writing Across the Curriculum Program.

The trustees are considering the new policy and will vote on the measure at their next meeting.

The Small Business Development Center was the main sponsor of the March teleconference. The center also was instrumental in planning the August seminar.


4.3 Titles of Activities

Capitalize formal titles of campus activities:

Homecoming

Autumn Leaf Festival


4.4 University Calendar

Capitalize the following:

Fall Semester

Spring Semester

Summer I

Summer II

 

Do not capitalize the following:

drop/add

pre-registration

registration

spring break

winter holiday

(See also Appendix C. Miscellaneous Usage.)


4.5 Grant and Award Titles

Capitalize formal titles of grants and awards.

Examples:

A Clarion University alumnus and business manager of a nearby school district has been awarded the Gary Reeser Memorial Award of the Pennsylvania Association of School Business Officials (PASBO).


4.6 Titles of Courses

Use full caps for the course prefix and capitalize all first letters of significant words of course titles. (Note from the example that prepositions, connectives, and articles such as in, and, and the are not capitalized.)

Examples:

ART 190. Teaching Art in the Elementary Grades

COOS 110. Introduction to Computer Information Systems is a prerequisite for CIS 226. Computer Systems Development with High-Level Tools.

For lists of proper course titles, numbers, and descriptions, see the current Undergraduate Catalog or Graduate Catalog.

 

Do not capitalize informal course titles.

Examples:

English composition

computer lab

That history course filled quickly at registration


4.7 Majors, Minors, and Concentrations

Lower case the following except for proper nouns such as German and Russian:

Examples:

majors (Spanish major, marketing major, English major)

minors (anthropology minor, speech communication major)

concentrations (theatre/acting, engineering/physics).

 



5. Headings

Use upper and lower case, not all capitals, for headings. Do not underline headings, unless you are preparing a manuscript for direct duplication.

Example:

Academic Support Services

Provide a clearly defined system of headings and subheadings to guide readers. When preparing copy for a printed publication, follow the example below for up to four levels of headings:

 

To show levels of headings, place them in the typed manuscript as follows:

First Level-
Center chapter titles over the copy

Second Level-
Place even with left margin on a separate line.

Third Level-
Position subheadings on a separate line and indent even with the copy indentation below

Fourth Level-
If another level of subheadings is necessary, start the heading within the text immedia after the paragraph indention and follow it with a period.


Example:

headings



6. Numbers

6.1 Numbers

In general, spell out numbers one through nine in text. For numbers 10 and above, use digits. In cases where the numeral is the first word in the sentence (avoid whenever possible), spell it out.

Example:

Professor Krauss requested 12 student workers for three days a week.

Exceptions:

For percentages, use numbers and spell out the word percent, except in tables when the use of the % sign is acceptable.

For ages, always use digits.


6.2 Time of Day

Express times other than the hour as 2:30 a.m. or 10:53 p.m. (Note lower case a.m. and p.m.) But express whole hours as 2 a.m., not 2:00 a.m.

Examples:

The event runs from 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m.

Exception:

In tables, use the :00 in cases where the format would be disturbed by omitting the 00.


6.3 Sums of Money

In text, delete the .00; in tables use .00. DO NOT repeat numbers parenthetically after spelling them out, i.e., eighteen (18).

Example:

The budget of the Mathematics Club was $735.

In text, express high rounded dollar amounts as $9 billion instead of $9,000,000,000.


6.4 Quality-Point Averages (QPAs)

Express quality-point averages (QPAs) with one decimal place.

Example:

Graduate students must maintain a 3.0 quality-point average (QPA).


6.5 Numbers in Lists

Within the text, use parentheses on both sides of numbers in lists.

Example:

Renovation is scheduled for (1) Founders Hall, (2) Harvey Hall, and (3) Montgomery Hall.

 

6.6 Numbers in Measurement

Examples:

14-inch poster

three-by-five-inch ad

 



7. Period


7.1 Periods in Lists

Use a period at the end of each item in a vertical list if the list is comprised of full sentences.

Exception:

If sentences complete an introductory element, punctuate like an extended sentence.

Examples:

Continuing Education activities fall within three categories:

1. Non-credit courses are activities open to the general public without regard to educational background.

2. Credit courses are offered to meet professional needs.

3. Conferences provide a concentrated experience developed for a particular group.

 

To do well in physics:

1. you need a firm background in mathematics; and

2. you should attend class and develop good study skills.

 

Do not use periods at the end of one-word items or sentence fragments in a vertical list.

Example:

The materials needed for Drawing I:

1. drawing board

2. number 2 pencil

3. sketch pad

 

Use a period following letters or numbers before items in a vertical list. Do not use parentheses. (See also 12. Outline form.)

Example:

A. Greek organizations

B. Recognized clubs and activities

C. Student government


7.2 Period With Other Punctuation

Position the period inside the quotation marks.

Example:

The student's advisor said, "Pre-register if you want to get into the class before it fills."

When parentheses or brackets enclose a complete sentence, place the period inside; for sentence fragments, place the period outside.

Example:

That book is located at PN 3151.H3. (For other texts on this subject, see the computer listing.)

One of the largest academic units is the College of Business

Administration (housed in Still Hall).


7.3 Period in Headings

Do not use a period after headings on a line separate from the text. Do use a period after lowest-level headings that are incorporated into the text. (See 5. Headings.)

Example:

Program Requirements

General Education. The general education distribution for all students in the college is presented on pages 63-64.


7.4 Ellipsis

Use three spaced periods within a quotation to indicate omitted material.

Example:

The debate coach said, "The team is open to all interested students who...can devote the necessary practice and travel time."

When a quotation is a complete sentence but is taken out of context, use three spaced periods after the original punctuation.

Example:

"To be or not to be/ that is the question..."


7.5 Period With Abbreviations

See 3. Abbreviations and Appendix C. Miscellaneous Usage.


7.6 Periods in URLs

Omit periods at sentences ending in an Internet address, to avoid confusion.

 



8. Comma


8.1 Comma in a Series

Always use a final comma before the words and/or in a series

Example:

The order was for five reams of letterhead, three boxes of pencils, and a carton of printer toner.


8.2 Comma With Dates

Use a comma to separate the date of the month from the year.

Example:

This legislation was enacted on August 14, 1973, and was publicized widely after that date.

Where dates are expressed generally, omit the comma.

Examples:

First semester ran from late August through mid-December 1996.

The class project was due at the end of May 1997.


8.3 Comma With Other Punctuation

Position the comma inside quotation marks.

Example:

"Class will not be cancelled due to the flu outbreak," announced the director of public information.

Place the comma outside parenthesis or brackets.

Example:

The scholarship provides up to one-half of the tuition at eligible schools (including Clarion University), and it is available only to Pennsylvania residents.


8.4 Comma With Numbers

Use a comma in numbers 1,000 and above.

Example: 2,563,481

 



9. Dash and Hyphen


9.1 Long Dash

Type two hyphens-without spaces before or after-to indicate a long dash (an em dash in typesetting) to separate elements.

Example:

Carlson Library-located centrally on campus-houses the University Gallery as well as the library and academic units.


9.2 Hyphenated Telephone Numbers

Use hyphens in telephone numbers. When citing a toll-free number, use dashes to separate the elements throughout.

Example:

814-226-2000; 1-800-521-1627


9.3 Hyphenating Compound Words

Use a single hyphen (an en dash in typesetting), without spaces before or after, in compound adjectives, which are followed by the words they modify.

Example:

The student bought a yellow-green house plant at the BIOS Club sale.

 



10. Quotation Marks


10.1 Double Quotation Marks

Enclose quotations in the text with double quotation marks. Also enclose titles for publications shorter than book length (i.e., magazine titles, short stories, and poems) in double quotation marks. (See 2.5 Titles of Works Cited.)

Examples:

According to the brochure, "Gemmell Student Complex is a spacious, well-equipped facility."

Today's assignment was "Ode to a Grecian Urn."


10.2 Single Quotation Marks

Use single quotation marks to enclose a quote within a quote.

Example:

The math student said, "My advisor told me, 'Be sure to take MATH 232 this semester. It is a prerequisite for MATH 233. ' "


10.3 Quotation Marks With Other Punctuation

At the end of a quote, place a comma or period before the quotation marks, but place a

colon or semicolon outside the quotation marks.

Example:

The sign said, "Clarion University, turn left."

There are many activities to enjoy during "ALF": auto shows, sidewalk sales, food booths, and even a carnival.

Placement of quotation marks or exclamation marks depends upon the quote.

Example:

"That is an excellent observation!" responded Dr. Ritter.

Are you sure the professor said, "Classes are cancelled for Friday"?

 



11 Italics


11.1 Italics for Works Cited

See 2.5 Titles of works cited.


11.2 For Emphasis

Typesetting can achieve emphasis through (1) italic or bold lettering, (2) type size variations, (3) capitalization, and (4) graphic placement. To indicate the use of italics, underline the elements to be emphasized.

Example:

A part-time student may apply for degree candidacy after completing 11 credit hours. A part-time student must apply and be approved for degree candidacy by the time he or she has earned 11 credit hours.

 



12. Plurals

Most words: add s.

cars, eggs

Words ending in ch, s, sh, ss, x, and z: add es.

arch/arches, ax/axes, glass/glasses. (Some exceptions exist, e.g. monarchs.)

Words ending in is: change to es.

oasis/oases, parenthesis/parentheses.

Words ending in y: if preceded by a consonant or qu, change y to i and add es. If preceded by a vowel, add s.

berry/berries, navy/navies, alley/alleys, chimney/chimneys.

Words ending in o: if preceded by a consonant, most require es. If preceded by a vowel, add s.

buffalo/buffaloes, domino/dominoes, stereo/stereos, tattoo/tattoos. (Some exceptions exist, e.g., pianos.)

Words ending in f/fe: change f/fe to v and add es.

half/halves, wife/wives. (Some exceptions exist, e.g., chief/chiefs, dwarf/dwarfs, scarf/scarves or scarfs, wharf/wharves or wharfs.)

Latin endings:

change us to i.

alumnus/alumni.

Note: A single male graduate is an alumnus; plural male graduates are alumni.

change a to ae.

alumna, alumnae. (Some exceptions, e.g. formula, formulas.)

Note: a singular female graduate is an alumna; plural female graduates are alumnae.

change on to a.

phenomenon/phenomena

change um to s.

memoranda/memorandums, referendums.

Form change:

man/men, child/children, person/people.

No change:

corps, deer, moose, sheep, money.

Compound words:

For solids, add s.

cupfuls, teaspoonfuls.

For separated or hyphenated words:

make the most significant word plural: postmasters general, presidents-elect., assistant attorneys, major generals.

Proper names:

Ending in es or z, add es.

Joneses, Gonzalezes.

Ending in y, add s

Duffys, the two Germanys.

Others, add s.

the Smiths, the Grunenwalds.

Figures: add s.

1920s, 727s, low 20s. Do not use an apostrophe.

Single letters:

Use 's. A's, B's

Multiple letters: add s.

ABCs.

 



13. Apostrophe

For possessives:

Add 's to:

plural nouns not ending in s: the alumni's contributions.

Add only an apostrophe to:

plural nouns ending in s: the departments' needs.

plural nouns that are singular in meaning: measles' effects.

singular nouns not ending in s: the church's needs, the girl's books, the fox's den, the justice's verdict.

singular common nouns ending in s, unless the next word begins with s: the hostess's invitation, the witness' story.

singular proper names ending in s: Socrates' Dickens'

words ending in an s sound when followed by a word that begins with an s, but an 's when the next word begins with other letters: for appearance's sake, the appearance's cost.

nouns that are the same in singular and plural as plurals, even if singular in meaning: the two deer's track, the lone moose's antlers.

For pronouns:

Personal, interrogative and relative pronouns have separate forms for possessive. Otherwise, follow possessive rules: others' plans, someone's guess.

For compound words:

follow above rules adding ' or 's to the word closest to the object possessed: the assistant director's motions, anyone else's position.

Note: Sometimes, clarity is best served by reconstructing the sentence to avoid ambiguity.

For joint possession:

use possessive form after the last word: the men and women's basketball teams.

Descriptive phrases:

don't add apostrophe: citizens band radio. An 's is required when a term involves a plural that doesn't end in an s: children's hospital.

Descriptive names:

Some use an apostrophe; some do not. Follow the user's practice - Veterans Administration, National Governors' Conference.

 

 



 

14. Outline Form

When material must be subdivided several times, use the following outline form and numbers.
I.

A.
B.


1.
2.


a.
b.


(a)
(b)


(i)
(ii)


II


A.
B.


(etc.)



 

15. Avoiding Gender Bias

Clarion University's "Avoiding Gender-Based Language in University Communications," published in 1988, states the university's position on sexism in official communications: "Clarion University's policy on equity seeks to provide an environment in which students,  faculty, staff, and guests experience no unfair treatment as a result of gender-based language.

The university therefore discourages use of language that reinforces stereotypes or inappropriate attitudes concerning gender roles.

"All official university communications, either written or oral, should be free  of gender-based language..."

 



 

15.1 Pronouns

When pronouns are used to include both genders, use the plural if appropriate to the context. If the plural is awkward or inappropriate, use he or she, him or her, and his or hers. Do not use he/she or s/he.

Example:

To change residency status, students must complete a Residency Classification Data Collection Form.

For university purposes, a student does not acquire a domicile in Pennsylvania until he or she has been here for at least one year primarily as a permanent resident and not merely as a student.

 

 



15.2 Occupational Terms

Use neutral terms for occupations. Do not link certain types of work with only one gender, and do not assume that the readers of the publication are only one gender.

Example:

  • police officer, not policeman.

  • business executive or manager, not businessman.

  • parenting or nurturing, not mothering.

  • staffing the phones, not manning the phones.


15.3 Parallel Treatment

In descriptions of women and men, use parallel language, and refer to each by titles, full names, or first and last names only.

Example:

Dr. Parker and Dr. Sanders; Dr. Melanie Parker and Dr. William Sanders; Parker and Sanders (after first reference)
Special Note: Some attempts to remove gender can be awkward and it may be better to change your sentence. For instance: Dr. LeGene Quesenberry is the chairperson of the committee. A simpler, more direct construction is: Dr. LeGene Quesenberry chairs the committee.

 



16. Equal Opportunity Statements

All official publications must bear an affirmative action statement.

16.1 Abbreviated Statements

The abbreviated statement for flyers, posters, radio, and television ads:

Clarion University is an affirmative action equal opportunity employer.

The statement for position vacancies:

Clarion University of Pennsylvania is building a diverse academic community and encourages people of color, women, Vietnam era veterans, and people with disabilities to apply. AA/EEO

16.2 Full Statements

The following full statement is for use in catalogs, handbooks, and other lengthy official publications, space permitting:

It is the policy of Clarion University of Pennsylvania that there shall be equal opportunity in all of its educational programs, services, and benefits, and there shall be no discrimination with regard to a student's or prospective student's race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation/affection, gender identity, veteran status or other classifications that are protected under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972. Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and other pertinent state and federal laws and regulations. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to: Assistant to the President for Social Equity, Clarion University of Pennsylvania, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA 16214-1232, 814-393-2109, and direct
inquiries regarding services or facilities accessibility to 504 ADA Coordinator (Assistant Director for Social Equity), 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA 16214-1232, 914-226-2000; (or to the Director of the Office for Civil Rights, Department of Education, 330 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20201).
 

The following statement is for student-related publications:

It is the policy of Clarion University of Pennsylvania that there shall be equal opportunity in all of its educational programs, services and benefits, and there shall be no discrimination with regard to a student’s or prospective student’s race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, age, sexual orientation/affection, gender identity, veteran status or any other factors that are protected under local, state, and federal laws. Direct equal opportunity inquiries to Assistant to the President for Social Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA 16214-1232, 814-393-2109.


 

This statement is for Clarion and Beyond:

Clarion University of Pennsylvania is committed to equal employment and equal educational opportunities for all qualified individuals regardless of race, color, sex, religion, national origin, affectional or sexual orientation, gender identity, age, disability, or other classifications that are protected under Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 and other pertinent state and federal laws and regulations.  Direct equal opportunity inquiries to: Assistant to the President for Social Equity, 207 Carrier Administration Building, Clarion, PA 16214-1232, 814-393-2109.

 



17. Mailing Regulations

Bulk and business reply mail and cards have very specific mailing, spacing, printing, and size requirements. Contact PAGES for information.

 



18. Publishing lndicia

All official university publications must be reviewed by PAGES before printing. They should bear the PAGES logo, and the month/year of publication in 8 point or smaller type.

 



Appendix A

Academic Departments
College of Arts and Sciences
Department of Anthropology, Geography, and Earth Science
Department of Art
Department of Biology
Department of Chemistry
Department of Communication
Department of Computer Information Science
Department of English
Department of History
Department of Mathematics
Department of Modern Languages and Cultures
Department of Music
Department of Physics
Department of Political Science, Sociology, and Philosophy
Department of Psychology
Department of Speech Communication
Department of Theatre
Department of Women and Gender Studies
College of Business Administration
Department of Accountancy
Department of Administrative Science
Department of Economics
Department of Finance
Department of Marketing
College of Education and Human Services
Department of Academic Support Services
Department of Education
Department of Health and Physical Education
Department of Library Science
Department of Special Education and Rehabilitative Sciences
Department of Communication Sciences or Disorders
School of Nursing and Allied Health

 

 



 

Appendix B

Clarion Campus Facilities
Clarion Campus
Admissions Center
Ballentine Hall
Becht Hall
Becker Hall
Clarion University Store
Campus View Suites
Carlson Library
Carrier Administration Building
Carter Auditorium
Center for Computing Services
Central Services Building
Ceramics Studio
Chartwell's Dining Services
Davis Hall
Eagle Commons
Eagle Sculpture
Egbert Hall
Express Shop
Founders Hall
Foundry
Gemmell Student Complex
Givan Hall
Hart Chapel
Hart Chapel Theatre
Harvey Hall
Keeling Health Services Center
Lewis Computer Center
Marwick-Boyd Auditorium
Marwick-Boyd Fine Arts Center
Marwick-Boyd Little Theatre
McEntire Maintenance Building
Memorial Stadium
Moore Hall
Nair Hall
Natatorium
Science and Technology Center
Planetarium
Ralston Hall
Riemer Snack Bar
Special Education Center
Speech and Hearing Clinic
Stevens Hall
Still Hall
Thorn I
Thorn II
Tippin Gymnasium
University Gallery
Valley View Suites
Wilkinson Hall
Women's and Gender Studies Center
Venango Campus Facilities
Clarion University Store
Frame Hall
Montgomery Hall
Rhoades Center
Suhr Library
The Writing Center

 

 



 

Appendix C

Miscellaneous Usage
Academic Council
advisor
associate degree (for specific degrees, see 3. Abbreviations)
audio-visual
bachelor's degree or baccalaureate degree (for specific degrees, see 3. Abbreviations)
before the event (not prior to the event)
Clarion University Store
chair (for head of an academic department; not chairman or chairperson)
Clarion Campus
Clarion Students' Association
Clarion University-Venango Campus (first reference)
coeducational
Commencement
course work (not coursework)
credit-no record
data base (noun), but database materials (adjective)
Deans Council
doctorate or doctoral degree
drop-add
Express Shop
extracurricular
freshman (adjective: not capitalized; Example: freshman year, freshman student, but: The freshmen (plural noun) were here for orientation.)
GA, GAs
in-depth (adjective, but "He presented the material in depth."
in-service (adjective)
Internet
Internet-based
junior (capitalized only in abbreviation form with a name: James Smith Jr.)
master's degree (not capitalized); but "She is working toward the Master of Science in Library Science."
microcomputer
Multi-Purpose Room
non-credit
non-profit
on-line (adjective); but "They have four software programs online."
Pennsylvania State System of Higher Education
percent, percentage
phonathon
Pre-Session
QPA (quality-point average)
RA, RAs
resides in Clarion (not lives in Clarion)
s.h.-semester hours (not c.h. for credit hours)
senior (capitalized only in abbreviation form with a name: James Jones Sr.)
Social Security number (or S.S. no.)
sophomore (not capitalized)
TelReg
TV (not tv, t.v. or T.V.)
Venango Campus (second reference)
Web
Web-based
Website
World Wide Web
western Pennsylvania
18th annual tournament (not Eighteenth. Ordinal numbers follow same rules as numerals-spell out first through ninth, use numerals for others.)
20th century
'60s (for graduation year with name-Bonnie Boone '96)
1930s (no apostrophe)
$110 million (not $110,000,000)