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:: Course Offerings

The course offerings at Clarion University of PA go through an extensive review process by the Committee on Courses and Programs of Study (CCPS).  This course offerings list is a comprehensive list of courses that could be offered; it does not mean they are currently being offered.

For a complete list of courses offered on the current or upcoming schedules, see the Registrar's page Schedule of Classes.

To start a new search enter the course number of the subject or title you are searching in the box below.



Course Id (currently sorted in Ascending order) Course TitleCourse DescriptionLevel
BIOL 105
Freshman Biology Seminar
Recommended for all freshmen and new majors in any area of Biology. Enables students to (1) explore and understand various majors, minors, curricula, and career options in Biology; (2) become familiar with Biology Department faculty, research interes,ts and opportunities; (3) identify and /or utilize department, campus and community resources that will enhance their academic program; and (4) develop and apply strategies to facilitate the learning process.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 111
Basic Biology
Deals with the principles of biology. Includes cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy, inheritance, and people's interrelationship with their biological environment. Briefly, reviews the classification of plants and animals. Credit not to be applied toward biology major. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 115
Introductory Biology
A basic course in Biology for non-science majors. Includes cellular structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, survey of organisms, evolution, and ecology. Divided into two hours of lecture and a two-hour instruction/laboratory/discussion/r,ecitation session weekly. Credit not to be applied toward the Biology major. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 116
Aerodynamics: Ph/Bio Of Flight
The biomechanics of flight. Students will use techniques in physics and evolutionary biology to study how animals fly and swim. Drawing upon bats, birds, insects, and even winged seeds, we will discuss and test the basic operating principles of win,gs. We will apply results obtained with a wind tunnel to the locomotion of objects in water. Students will then be able to compare and contrast the flyers and swimmers of nature with those of human invention. The course will have a substantial stu,dio laboratory component. Offered every other fall.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 125
Intro To Forensic Science
Basic course in forensic science for non-majors combining field techniques in forensic ecology and taphonomy with laboratory techniques in molecular biology and biotechnology. Summer: daily for 8 hours, for 5 days or during the fall semester: weekly, for 3 hours, for 12 weeks. Credit not to be applied toward any biology major. Summer or fall on demand. Prerequisite: a course in basic or introductory biology or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 150
Insects And Society
A basic course in insects and their interactions with human society. Includes insect diversity, insect structure and function, insect biology, and both insect benefits and damage. Three lecture hours weekly. Credit may not be applied toward a Biol,ogy degree. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 153
Intro Animal Biology
|
Undergraduate
BIOL 154
Intro Plant Biology
|
Undergraduate
BIOL 155
Prin Of Biology I
Introduces fundamental concepts of biology focusing on the characteristics of living things, cell function, biological information, storage and retrieval, and organismal structure and function. Presents concepts in the context of current evolutionary, theory. Three hours lecture weekly. For biology majors. All science and science education majors and biology minors must concurrently register for BIOL 165|
Undergraduate
BIOL 156
Prin Of Biology II
Introduces fundamental concepts of biology focusing on organismal structure and function, adaptation, behavior, and ecology in the context of current evolutionary theory. Three hours lecture weekly. For biology majors. All science and science educati,on majors and biology minors must concurrently register for BIOL 166. SPring, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 165
Prin Of Biology I Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 155. Three hours laboratory weekly. For biology majors. Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 155 unless it is being repeated. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 166
Prin Of Biology II Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 156. Three hours laboratory weekly. For biology majors. Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 156 unless it is being repeated. Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 200
Selected Topics In Biol
Provides for focused study of a special interest topic in biology using different learning formats selected by the instructor as best suited for the particular course. May be offered in any semester, subject to demand and staff availability. Not for,biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 201
Genetics
A study of the principles of inheritance in plants and animals, including humans. Topics include Mendelian genetics, linkage recombination, cytogenetics, and molecular genetics. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour weekly. Prerequisites: C,ompletion of BIOL 155, 156, 165, and 166, with a grade of a C or better and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Fall and Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 202
Principles Of Ecology
Examines the interaction of organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment, population dynamics and interactions, community structure and function, and ecosystem energetics and biogeochemistry. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prere,quisites: Completion of BIOL 155, 156, 165 and 166 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor. Fall and Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 203
Cell Biology
Examines structure, biochemistry, and function of plant and animal cells. Three lecture and two laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166, CHEM 151 or 153, 161 or 163, 152 or 154, 162 or 164, all with a C or better. Each seme,ster.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 210
Sec Sci Ed Sophomore Seminar
Introduces biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, and physics education majors to the major requirements in their program. Cross disciplinary discussions guide students in the integration of pedagogical principles from their foundation,education courses with content from their specialty courses. Students are introduced to the PA Academic Standards as well as the National Science Education Standards. Artifacts created with guidance in this seminar become part of an electronic Lear,ning Portfolio. Required for all Secondary General Science majors. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 211
Environ Science & Sustain
Humans are changing the global environment in profound ways but the consequences are not widely understood. This course will examine current environmental issues from a scientific perspective and explore how science can be best used to shape sound e,nvironmental law and regulation, public lands, types and sources of air and water pollution, and other environmental issues of current interest. Environmental issues of local and regional importance will be emphasized. Three lecture hours weekly.,Credit not to be applied toward a biology major.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 224
Human Biology
This course focuses on the biology of the human organism. Recent scientific and medical advances as they relate to the development of public policy are interwoven through topics covered. The biology of our aging human population including issues su,ch as infection, autoimmunity, cancer, as well as respiratory, cardiovascular, and urinary system decline, will be discussed. Credit not to be applied toward a biology major or biology education certification. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 225
Human Genetics
Mendelian genetics and the inheritance of human genetic disease. Examines the anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of human diseases, including diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cancer, and the genetic component of human illness. An,alyzes behavioral genetics, sociobiology, recombinant DNA, gene therapy, and medical ethics. Non-majors course for students who wish to know more about human genetics than is available in basic biology. Particularly useful for students in anthropolog,y, rehabilitative sciences, psychology, sociology, and special education. Prerequisite: One semester of biology or permission of instructor. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 251
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
Analyzes the normal structure of the human body and how it functions. Focuses on skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems and their interrelationships. Three lecture hours weekly. Fall, annually. Not for biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 252
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Continuation of BIOL 251, Anatomy and Physiology I. Includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems and their interrelationships. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: Biol 251. Spring, annually. Not for biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 260
Microbiology
Examines microorganisms, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, emphasizing those associated with human health and disease. Considers immunity and resistance to infectious diseases and to their epidemiological and public health aspects. La,boratory emphasizes pathogenic bacteria and the bacteriological and microscopic techniques. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Not for biology majors. Pittsburgh Campus, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 261
Hum Anat & Phys I Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 251 with emphasis on anatomy and select physiology activities. Focuses on skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocine systems. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must b,e taken concurrently with BIOL 251 unless it is being repeated. Fall, annually. Not for biology majors.l|
Undergraduate
BIOL 262
Human Anatomy & Phys II Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and intergrate course material emphasized in BIOL 252, and continuation of BIOL 261. Focuses on circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must be taken concurr,ently with BIOL 252 unless it is being repeated. Spring, annually. Nor for biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 289
Career Dev Health Prof
Students in this course will research and discuss current issues in health care, including professionalism, policy, practice, and reform. The goals of this course are to familiarize future health care professionals with issues related to their career,, as well as with the applciation process and requirements for admissino to health professional programs (medical, dental, veterinary, etc.), guide students in preparing a portfolio of necessay application materials, and develop their writing, interv,iew, test-taking, and other necessary skills and experiences. It will also include a service-learning activity. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor's permission|
Undergraduate
BIOL 301
Marine Invertebrates
This course introduces students to the taxonomy, structure, function and ecology of marine invertebrates emphasizing specializations which have allowe these animals to exploit a wide variety of marine habitats. Major trends in invertebrate evolution, will be used to illustrate the development of form and function in these animals. Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology. Completion of a crouse in general zoology is desirable. Summer, on demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 305
General Zoology
Surveys the animal kingdom. Emphasizes the biology and classification of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Covers the role of animals in ecosystems and interrelationships among the various taxa and aspects of morphology, phylogeny, ethology,,and zoogeography. Includes special reference to animals occurring in Pennsylvania. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 306
General Botany
A survey of the structure, function and diversity of non-vascular and vascular plants from an evolutionary perspective. Topics will include structure, function, organization and evolution of plant cells and tissues, photosynthesis and nutrition, wat,er uptake and balance, hormonal control of growth, reproduction and dispersal, and classification and systematics. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166 or equivalent courses.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 307
General Mycology
A survey of Kingdom Fungi, with particular emphasis on the mushrooms, molds, yeasts, smuts, rusts and slime molds. Topics include the morpholoogy, physiology, biochemistry, systematics, ecology and evolution of fungi. Laboratory stresses identificati,on of higher fungi, laboratory techniques and field mycology. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 155 and BIOL 156 or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years|
Undergraduate
BIOL 310
Sec Sci Ed Junior Seminar
This seminar engages secondary science education majors in cross disciplinary content and pedagogical discussions. Students create lesson plans that engage secondary students in science investigations, using advanced technologies where appropriate., Artifacts created in this seminar become part of an electronic Learning Portfolio. Includes early field experience guided teaching experiences.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 341
General Microbiology
A study of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi. Extensive laboratory work includes isolation, staining, culturing, and identification of microorganisms. Examine prokaryotic cell architecturee, microbial physiology, methods or control,ling the growth of microbes, micorbial genetics, medical microbiology, and applied and environmental microbiology. Two lecture periods and two laboratory periods weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 164, 166, CHEM 151 or 153, 161 or 163, 152 or 15,4, 162 or 164, all with a C or better. Each semester.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 360
Problems In Biology
Acquaints students with skills and techniques used in research. Students identify a problem for investigation and complete all phases of its study, including writing a research report. Approval from the staff member who will direct the student must b,e secured before pre-registration.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 375
Herpetology
Students will study the ecology and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Topics to be studied include behavior, morphology, physiology, taxonomic diversity, systematic practice, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. Course includes a subst,antial field component. Taught summer session, Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 202|
Undergraduate
BIOL 382
Evolution
Analyzes evolution and its links with other areas of biology. Includes the history of evolutionary thought, species concepts and speciation processes, phylogenetic patterns and their reconstruction, diversity of life, and the mechanisms of evolution., Satisfies the second value flags of the university general education requirements. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology and one semester of genetics (BIOL 201 at Clarion) or permission of i,nstructor.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 400
Special Topics
Advanced topics in various areas of biology. The professor selects a format most suitable to the study. May be offered on request of students, subject to staff availability. Enrollment by consent of the instructor. On demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 402
Biometry
Intro to the collection, analysis, and presentation of biological data. Fundamental aspects of designing and executing descriptive and experimental studies emphasizing biological research. Stresses applications to undergraduate and graduate research,in progress in the Department of Biology. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 403
Coral Reef Ecology
A study of coral reef structure, formation, types, and the relationships of reef organsims to their environment. Emphasis is given to species diversity, identification, symbioses, and effects of temperature, salinity, light, nutrient concentration,,predation, and competition on the abundance and the distribution of coral reef organisms. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology. Completion of a course in general zoology in desirable. Summer, on demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 404
Genomics And Bioinformatics
The new disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics analyze the deluge of DNA sequence data currently being generated. Topics include comparative structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, genetic variation in humans and pharmacogene,tics, and genomic circuits and complex diseases. Students will be introduced to the computational techniques and algorithms of Bioinformatics, and use them to mine information about a gene and genome of their choice. Designed for students in biolog,y, molecular biology, evolutionary biology, biochemistry, industrial mathematics and computational science. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and MATH 260 OR MATH 221, or permission of instructor. Fall alternate|
Undergraduate
BIOL 405
Ecological Applications
Case history approach to the analysis and possible resolution of both terrestrial and aquatic environmental problems. Students analyze problems from a number of perspectives, including the biological, in an assessment of the problem. Incorporates sam,ple design, cost considerations, data collection, and analysis into the assessment. Overall assessment of problems and possible resolutions will be conveyed both orally and in a written format. Intended as a capstone for students in the Applied Ecolo,gy Program, but appropriate for other students who meet prerequisites. Satisfies the writing intensive and second values flags of the university general education requirements. Prerequisites: BIOL 202 or permission of the instructor, BIOL 493 and 494|
Undergraduate
BIOL 410
Field Meth In Environ Biol
A field-based course designed to give students hands-on experience in the various methods needed in environmental studies. The course will focus on the environmental assessment of terrestrial and aquatic habitats and the impacts of perturbations on,flora, fauna, and natural landscapes. Summer, on demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 411
Wildlife Ecology & Mgmt
An in-depth approach to the ecology and management of wildlife species - birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles - at scales ranging from populations to landscapes. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in wildlife ecology and manageme,nt such as the dynamics of exploited populations, non-game wildlife, population regulation by predators, parasites, and diseases, habitat evaluation and management, and restoration of wildlife populations. Laboratory will emphasize descriptive and i,nvestigative studies of wildlife in local ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 305 desirable.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 425
Fisheries Biology
Examines ecology of fish populations, including taxonomy identification, age and growth, population estimation and analysis, food habits, management, and environmental requirements. Emphasizes data analysis and application of microcomputers in fisher,ies work. Two lecture and three hours of laboratory or field work weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in ecology or permission of instructor and PA fishing license required. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 427
Field Botany
Field-based course emphasizing the identification and natural history of common vascular plants native to western Pennsylvania and methods used to study them. Course will be taught at a time when the spring flora is conspicuous. Spring, alternate y,ears.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 428
Ornithology
Deals with the biology of birds. Lectures cover topics such as classification; internal and external adaptations for flight, migration, nesting, feeding habits, behavior, ecology, and physiology. Two lectures and three laboratory or field trip hours, per week. Prerequisite: Junior or higher standing in biology or permission from the instructor. Spring, even numbered years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 430
Biology Of Cancer
This course presents an in depth overview of both the scientific and clinical aspects of cancer with an emphasis on the cellular, molecular, and genetic models of cancer development in humans. Topics include: cancer epidemiology, biochemical process,es of malignant process, TNM classification, modern advances in tumor biology and molecular biology including the effects of a variety of agents (chemical, radiation, viruses, and oncogenes) that cause human cancer. Furthermore, the course examines,the major types of cancer as well as present methods of cancer prevention and treatment. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Fall, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 432
Field Ornithology
Deals primarily with the identification and natural history of birds of western Pennsylvania. It is taught at a time when migratory species are commonly seen. Although lectures are an important component, indoor and outdoor laboratory activities pl,ay a predominant role. Prerequisite: BIOL 155/165 and BIOL 156/166 or permission of the instructor. Spring, even numbered years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 440
Environmental Microbiology
Explores the diversity, distribution, and activiites of microorganisms in natural, managed and extreme environments, with a particular focus on microbial communities, interactions and environmental processes. Laboratory sessions and field experience,s will be on an arranged basis. Prerequisite: BIOL 341 or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years|
Undergraduate
BIOL 443
Virology
Study of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses, emphasizing biochemistry, structure, life cycles, and disease-causing mechanisms. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341: CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. F,all, even numbered years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 444
Immunology
Study of the mammalian immune system. The course will focus on the parts of the system and how they function together to produce the varied and complex regulated responses that provide innate and adaptive immunity. The course will also incorporate,case studies involving dysfunction and pathophysiology of the immune system. Since this course is required for medical technology majors, essential laboratory principles and skills involving microscopy (light and flouorescence), utraviolet and visibl,e spectroscopy, affinity chromatography, mammalian virus culture, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, electrophoresis and blotting are presented. Three lecture hours weekly and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM|
Undergraduate
BIOL 446
Pathogenic Microbiol
Study of the infectious agents of mammals and the diseases that result from infection by these agents. The course will focus on bacterial agents, their diagnosis and treatment. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning, of diagnostic procedures and case studies involving examples of pathogenic organisms. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Fall annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 450
Cell Physiology
Study of the regulatory processes that occur within the eukaryotic cell that gover homeostasis and allow for adaptive change. The course will focus on membrane biochemistry, transport, protein sorting, cell signaling, cytoskeletal nanomotors, and ce,ll specialization. The laboratory portion of the course incorporatesexperiential learning of basic procedures that allow experientalists to uncover the workings of the eukaryotic cell. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequ,isites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 451
Animal Physiology
Study of the comparative physiology of animals, including water and ion regulations, circulation, respiration, nutrition, nervous activity, endicrine functions, and responses to temperautre, light, gasses, and pressure. Two lecture and three laborat,ory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203; CHEM 252, 261, 252, and 262, or permission of instructor.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 452
Plant Physiology
Life processes and responses of plants to the environment. Includes water relations, transpiration, translocation, photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, plant hormones and morphogenesis, photoperiodism, temperature responses, environmental and str,ess physiology. Two lectures and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in genetics, cell biology, and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. On demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 453
Patho I, Endogen Agents
Analyzes the mechanisms by which disease occurs in humans. Emphasizes responses to the disease process, and the effects of pathophysiologic mechanisms on the normality of cell, tissue, organ and system functions, and the response of the body to the d,isease process. Prerequisites: Prior courses in physiology desired. Two years of study in biology or permission of instructor. Venango Campus and Pittsburgh site, annually. Not for biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 454
Patho II Exog Agents
Study of mechanisms by which disease occurs in humans. Emphasizes disease related to heredity, physical, chemical, and biological stresses. Prerequisite: Three semesters of biology required or permission of instructor. Venango Campus, annually. Not f,or biology majors.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 455
Endocrinology
Surveys the chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations in animals. Three hours lecture weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in physiology and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 456
Entomology
General study of insects, including structure, physiology, classification, economic importance, and ecology. Two lecture and three hours of laboratory or fieldwork weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology or permissio,n of instructor. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 459
Physiological Ecology
Nearly every habitat on earth, from thermal hot springs to polar ice caps, is home to some form of life. Physiological Ecology explores the biotic and abiotic challenges to organisms imposed by their environments and adaptations which allow them to,survive in various habitats, both in terms of how organisms physiologically adapt to short-term fluctuations in their environment and how adaptations influence biogeographic distribution and evolutionary success of various species. Topics include ad,aptations related to temperature, water and salt balance, and gas exchange. Adaptations of organisms to extreme or unusual environments may be considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, 203, 451 or instructor's permission. Spring, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 460
Comp Vertebrate Anatomy
Traces the most important trends in the evolution of basic structures in vertebrate lines and conveys an appreciation of how the mammals came to possess the combination of characters that make this group unique. Three lectures and three laboratory,hours weekly. Prerequisites: Two semesters of Intro Biology, or permission of instructor. Frequency: Alternate years|
Undergraduate
BIOL 464
Developmental Biology
The course focuses on the major processes in multi-cellular development and embryogenesis and their underlying biochemical mechanisms. Throughout the semester, students will study various processes, such as cell differentiation, intra- and inter-cel,lular induction, and organismal morphogenesis. The class will primarily focus on animal or vertebrate development, though invertebrate and plant model organisms will also be examined. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, BIOL 203, CHEM 251, CHEM 252, CHEM 261,, and CHEM 262, all with a C or better. Fall, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 470
Mammalogy
Interrelationships of mammals and the biotic and biotic environment. Includes discussions and investigations of mammalian distribution, diversity, taxonomy, ecology, and physiology. Includes both field and laboratory studies. Two lecture and three, laboratory hours weekly. On demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 471
Plant Ecology
In-depth approach to the interaction of plants with the physical and biotic environments at population, community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion focus on current topics in plant ecology such as disturbance, succession, herbi,vory, dispersal, competition, and environmental stress. Laboratory includes field-based experimental and descriptive investigations of plant population and communities. Two hours lecture/discussion and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: A c,ourse in principles of ecology or permission of instructor. On demand (Pymatuning).|
Undergraduate
BIOL 473
Freshwater Ecology
Field-oriented study of the physics, chemistry, and biology of standing and flowing inland waters. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 474
Ecol Of Aquatic Insects
Examination of the ecological adaptations of aquatic insects with special emphasis on morphology, habitat, and trophic relationships.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 475
Wetland Ecology
Wetlands are an important transitional habitat from terrestrial to aquatic systems. They provide services that are critical to the health and functioning of the ecosystem, but in many ways wetlands defy easy definition. This class will investigate th,e different types of wetlands, the properities that define wetlands, the benefits they supply to the ecosystem and society, and the history and present status of ecosystem management. Taught summer session Prerequisite: BIOL 202|
Undergraduate
BIOL 477
Forest Ecology
An in-depth approach to the structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in forest ecology and management such as major forest types and climate, influence of physical,factors like soils and hydrology on forest ecosystem function, the importance of disturbance, herbivores and pathogens in structuring forest ecosytems, and the concept and practice of sustainability in forest management. Laboratory emphasizes descri,ptive and investigative studies of local forest ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 306 desirable. Fall, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 478
Biome Studies
A travel-study program which offers opportunities for study in the various biomes, e.g., grasslands, montane, seashore, etc. On demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 483
Molecular Biology
Study of the structural and functional relationships of the major biological macromolecules, emphasizing nucleic acid biology. Laboratory emphasizes current systems, methods, and applications of biotechnology, including recombinant DNA techniques. Tw,o lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites:BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 485
Biotechnology
Advanced topics in the current systems, methods, and applications of nucleic acid and protein biotechnology. Two lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of a course in molecular biology or permission of instructor. Annually,.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 491
Biogeography
The subject matter will cover aspects of the distribution of plants and animals. Main topics of concern will include interpretive approaches to biogeography, paleobiogeographic evidence of past distributions, the centers of origin of various groups,,mechanics and routes of dispersal and colonization, and the dynamics of extinction. Prerequisites: A course in genetics and principles of ecology or permission of instructor. On demand.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 492
Animal Behavior
Study of the biological concepts of animal behavior. Investigates sensory receptors, internal mechanisms, genetics, learning and habituation, social organization, and communication. Lecture topics include techniques of observation and experiments in,animal behavior. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in principles of ecology and genetics or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 493
Comm & Ecosys Dynamics
In-depth approach to the structure, function, and dynamics of ecological systems at community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion focus on current topics such as niche theory, the regulation of community structure, food webs, eco,logical stability, diversity, succession, and energy and material cycles. Laboratory emphasizes field-based descriptive and investigative studies of local communities and ecosystems. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite,s: Completion of a course in principles of ecology, basic statistics highly desirable, or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 494
Population Biology
Investigates the empirical, experimental, and theoretical aspects of the structure, growth, and evolution of biological populations. Takes a holistic approach to how population genetics and population ecology interact to produce observed population s,tructure and dynamics. Two hours lecture/discussion and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in principles of ecology and applied calculus or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 495
Undergraduate Sem I
Extensive exposure to primary scientific research articles in their field of studies allows the students to critically assess modern experimental techniques and theories. Furthermore the students will practice critical thinking and communication ski,lls required for professional scientists. Students will critique each seminar via written reviews as well as verbal discussions; focusing conclusion, and analysis of student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Required for Molecula,r Biology/Biotechnology majors. Fall, annually.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 497
Evolutionary Ecology
Explores contemporary topics and landmark contributions in ecology and evolutionary biology through readings of research and review papers. Three hours lecture/discussion weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in principles of ecology, evolut,ion, and genetics, or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 499
Undergrad Res In Biology
Gives upper-level undergraduate students an experience in biological research. Students identify problems for investigation and complete all phases of study, including writing a research report. Prerequisites: Second semester junior or senior standin,g with a 3.0 QPA overall, a 3.0 QPA in biology or the consent of the department. Limited to a total of four credits during undergraduate career. Students seeking approval for a BIOL 499 project must complete the BIOL 499 registration form securing si,gnatures of the academic advisor and project director. BIOL 360 and 499 may not be used for the same project.|
Undergraduate
BIOL 500
Graduate Seminar
A survey of current literature, concepts, and theories from selected fields of biology. Two discussion hours weekly. By arrangement.|
Graduate
BIOL 502
Biometry
Collection, analysis, and presentation of biological data. Fundamental aspects of designing and executing descriptive and experimental studies with emphasis on biological research. Applications to undergraduate and graduate research in progress in th,e Department of Biology are stressed. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 503
Special Topics
Semi-independent studies of topical material under the guidance of the instructor. Maximum credit allowable toward graduation: nine semester hours. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and the student?s graduate committee.|
Graduate
BIOL 504
Genomics And Bioinformatics
The new disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics attempt to analyze the deluge of DNA sequence data currently being generated. Topics include comparative structure of prokayotic and eukaryotic genomes, genetic variation in humans and p,harmacogenetics, and genomic circuits and complex diseases. Students will be introduced to the computational techniques and algorithms of Bioinformatics, and use them to mine information about a gene and genome of their choice. Designed for student,s in biology, molecular biology, evolutionary biology, biochemistry, industrial mathematics and computational science. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and MATH 260 OR MATH 221 or permission of instructor. Fal|
Graduate
BIOL 505
Ecological Applications
A case history approach to the analysis and possible resolution of both terrestrial and aquatic environmental problems. Students will analyze the problem from a number of perspectives, including the biological, in an assessment of the problem. Sample, design, cost considerations, data collection, and analysis will be incorporated into the assessment. The overall assessment of the problem and possible resolution will be conveyed both orally and in a written format. This course is considered a caps,tone for students in the Applied Ecology Program, but is appropriate for other students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, or permission of the instructor. BIOL 493 and 494 are recommended. Spring, alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 508
Biology Internship
Internships provide practical experiences that are related to a student?s academic program or research area. Credits earned can be utilized as partial fulfillment of the Master of Science degree in biology. Students considering internship credits to,be applied toward the Master of Science degree must have the approval of their graduate advisory committee, the cooperating agency, and the appropriate university administrators. On demand.|
Graduate
BIOL 511
Wildlife Ecology & Mgmt
An in-depth approach to the ecology and management of wildlife species - birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles - at scales ranging from populations to landscapes. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in wildlife ecology and manageme,nt such as the dynamics of exploited populations, non-game wildlife, population regulation by predators, parasites, and diseases, habitat evaluation and management, and restoration of wildlife populations. Laboratory will emphasize descriptive and i,nvestigative studies of wildlife in local ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 305 desirable.|
Graduate
BIOL 520
Terrestrial Botany
A field course emphasizing the identification, distribution, and ecology of upland vascular plants of Western Pennsylvania. Field and laboratory projects will focus on plant characteristics, taxonomic relations, floristics, habitat relationship, inve,ntory methods, and plant community description and dynamics. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 521
Aquatic Entomology
Emphasis in this course is on identification of the major groups of invertebrates playing a role in natural communities and on the methods of quantifying their relative importance in the community. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 522
Aquatic Botany
Study of freshwater algae and aquatic vascular plants in field communities, methods of quantifying relative numbers and mass, and structural and physiological adaptations to the aquatic environment. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 523
Exp Vertebrate Ecology
Designed to give knowledge of basic field identification, capture techniques, quantification, and natural history of some of the common vertebrates of Pennsylvania. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 524
Freshwater Ichthyology
A study of the physiological reaction involved in the growth, reproduction, and death of microbes. Consideration is placed upon the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and fats. Enzymes, oxidation-reduction potentials, energy relationshi,ps, membrane potentials, and nutrients are considered. Prerequisites: General Microbiology and Biochemistry or permission of instructor. Two lecture and four lab hours per week.|
Graduate
BIOL 525
Fisheries Biology
Ecology of fish populations, including identification, age and growth, populations estimation and analysis, food habits, environmental requirements, and management considerations. Prerequisites: Environmental Biology or permission of instructor. Thre,e lecture hours per week. Laboratory sessions held on Saturdays. Student must possess a valid Pennsylvania fishing license.|
Graduate
BIOL 526
Field Ichthyology
A field course dealing with the interrelationships of fish with their biotic and abiotic environment. Fish in their natural habitats, pollution, and improvements of aquatic habitats, and applied aspects of fish ecology and fishery management will be, studied. (Pymatuning). Student must possess a valid Pennsylvania fishing license.|
Graduate
BIOL 527
Field Botany
A field-based course emphasizing the identification and natural history of common vascular plants native to western Pennsylvania and methods used to study them. Course will be taught at a time when the spring flora is conspicuous. Spring, alternate, years.|
Graduate
BIOL 528
Ornithology
This course deals with the biology of birds. Lectures cover topics such as classification, internal and external adaptations for flight, migration, nesting and feeding habits, behavior, ecology, and physiology. There are two lectures and three labora,tory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring, even-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 530
Biology of Cancer
This course presents an in depth overview of both the scientific and clinical aspects of cancer with an emphasis on the cellular, molecular, and genetic models of cancer development in humans. Topics include: cancer epidemiology, biochemical process,es of malignant process, TNM classification, modern advances in tumor biology and molecular biology including the effects of a variety of agents (chemical, radiation, viruses, and oncogenes) that cause human cancer. Furthermore, the course examines,the major types of cancer as well as present methods of cancer prevention and treatment. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Fall, alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 532
Field Ornithology
This course deals primarily with the identification and natural history of birds of western Pennsylvania. It is taught at a time when migratory species are also commonly seen. Although lectures are an important component, indoor and outdoor laborator,y activities play a predominant role in this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 155/165; BIOL 156/166; or permission of the instructor. Spring, even-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 540
Environmental Microbiology
Explores the diversity, distribution, and activiites of microorganisms in natural, managed and extreme environments, with a particular focus on microbial communities, interactions and environmental processes. Laboratory sessions and field experience,s will be on an arranged basis. Prerequisite: BIOL 341 or permission of Instructor. Spring, alternate years|
Graduate
BIOL 543
Virology
A study of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses, including the biochemistry of viruses and viral life cycles, techniques in the study of viruses in relation to diseases, tumors, and cancer. Prerequisites: Microbiology or Biochemistry or permission of, instructor. Three lecture hours per week.|
Graduate
BIOL 544
Immunology
Study of the mammalian immune system. The course will focus on the parts of the system and how they function together to produce the varied and complex regulated responses that provide innate and adaptive immunity. The course will also incorporate,case studies involving dysfunction and pathophysiology of the immune system. Essential laboratory principles and skills involving microscopy (light and flourescence), ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, affinity chromatography, mammalian virus cult,ure, enzume linked immunosorbent assay, electrophoresis and blotting are presented. Three lecture hours weekly and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annual|
Graduate
BIOL 546
Pathogenic Micro
Study of the infectious agents of mammals and the diseases that result from infection by these agents. The course will focus on bacterial agents, their diagnosis and treatment. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning, of diagnosis procedures and case studies involving examples of pathogenic organisms. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Fall annually.|
Graduate
BIOL 550
Cell Physiology
Study of the regulatory processes that occur within the eukaryotic cell that govern homeostasis and allow for adaptive change. The course will focus on membrance biochemistry , transport, protein sorting, cell signaling, cytoskeletal nanomotors, and, cell specialization. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning of basic procedures that allow experimentalists to uncover the workings of the eukaryotic cell. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Pr,erequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annually.|
Graduate
BIOL 551
Adv Animal Physiology
A detailed review of the comparative physiology of animals, including water and ion regulations, circulation, respiration, nutrition, nervous activity, endocrine functions, and responses to temperature, light, gasses, and pressure. Includes literatu,re review and individual investigations. Two lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cell Biology and Organic Chemistry, or permission of instructor.|
Graduate
BIOL 552
Adv Plant Physiology
Life processes and responses of plants to the environment. Topics include water relations, transpiration, translocation, photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, plant hormones and morphogenesis, photoperiodism, temperature responses, environmental a,nd stress physiology. Two lecture and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, and CHEM 254. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 555
Endocrinology
A survey of the chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations in animals. Three lecture hours per week.|
Graduate
BIOL 556
Entomology
A general study of insects, including structure, physiology, classification, economic importance, and relationships. Two lecture and three laboratory or field work hours weekly. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 559
Physiological Ecology
Nearly every habitat on earth, from thermal hot springs to polar ice caps, is home to some form of life. Physiological Ecology explores the biotic and abiotic challenges to organisms imposed by their environments and adaptations which allow them to,survive in various habitats, both in terms of how organisms physiologically adapt to short-term fluctuations in their environment and how adaptations influence biogeographic distribution and evolutionary success of various species. Topics include ad,aptations related to temperature, water and salt balance, and gas exchange. Adaptations of organisms to extreme or unusual environments may be considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, 203, 451 or instructor's permission. Spring, alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 563
Behavioral Ecology
An examination of the behavior of animals in relation to their natural environment with emphasis on the functioning of patterns of behavior in nature, intraspecific communication and social organization, behavioral relationships between species, and,the regulation of behavior by the environment. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 564
Developmental Biology
The course focuses on the major processes in multi-cellular development and embryogenesis and their underlying biochemical mechanisms. Throughout the semester, students will study various processes, such as cell differentiation, intra- and inter-cel,lular induction, and organismal morphogenesis. The class will primarily focus on animal or vertebrate decelopment, though invertebrate and plant model organisms will also be examined. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, BIOL 203, CHEM 251, CHEM 252, CHEM 261,, and CHEM 262, all with a C or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 570
Id-Quant-Bac-Fung
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Graduate
BIOL 571
Habitat Ecology-Aquatic
A detailed examination is made of the structure and functioning of selected aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of functioning systems. (3 credits at Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 572
Terrest Comm Ecology
A study of the composition, distribution, and dynamics of plants and animals in selected terrestrial communities. Major biomes to be included will be grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, and tundra. Summers only: six weeks. (3 credits at P,ymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 573
Freshwater Ecology
A field-oriented study of the physics, chemistry, and biology of standing and flowing inland waters.|
Graduate
BIOL 574
Ecol Of Aquatic Insects
Examination of the ecological adaptations of aquatic insects with special emphasis on morphology, habitat, and trophic relationships. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 575
Experimental Ecology
Study of designs suitable for investigation of natural populations and communities stressing statistical analysis, and the logical control of experiments in natural situations. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 576
Fungal Ecology
Emphasis will be on the role of fungi in the decomposition of organic materials in terrestrial and aquatic communities, and the recycling of mineral nutrients. (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 577
Forest Ecology
An in-depth approach to the structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiples scales. Lecture and discussion focuses on current topics in forest ecology and management such as major forest types and climate, influence of physical fa,ctors like soils and hydrology on forest ecosystem function, the importnace of disturbance, herbivores, and pathogens in structuring forest ecosystems, and the concept and practice of sustainability in forest management. Laboratory emphasizes descri,ptive and investigative studies of local forest ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.|
Graduate
BIOL 578
Biome Studies
A travel-study program which offers opportunities for study in the various biomes, e.g., grasslands, montane, seashore, etc. Summers only. Prerequisites: Environmental Biology or permission of instructor.|
Graduate
BIOL 579
Alpine Ecology
Students travel to the Beartooth Mountains in northern Wyoming where they may undertake field studies of aquatic and terrestrial communities along an altitudinal transect. Permission to register granted on an individual basis. (Students will share co,st of travel and food. Tents and cooking facilities will be provided.) (Pymatuning)|
Graduate
BIOL 582
Evolution
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Graduate
BIOL 583
Molecular Biology
Study of the structural and functional relationships of the major biological macromolecules, emphasizing nucleic acid biology. Laboratory emphasizes current systems, methods, and applications of biotechnology, including recombinant DNA techniques. T,wo lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Annually.|
Graduate
BIOL 585
Biotechnology
Advanced topics in the current systems, methods, and applications of recombinant DNA and protein biotechnology. Three lecture/discussion and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: BIOL 483/583 or consent of instructor. Spring, annually.|
Graduate
BIOL 591
Biogeography
The subject matter covers aspects of the distribution of plants and animals. Main topics of concern include interpretive approaches to biogeography, paleobiogeographic evidence of past distributions, the centers of origin of various groups, mechanism,s and routes of dispersal and colonization, and the dynamics of extinction. Prerequisites: BIOL 202 and 203.|
Graduate
BIOL 592
Animal Behavior
Study of the biological concepts of animal behavior. Investigates sensory receptors, internal mechanisms, genetics, learning and habituation, social organization, and communication. Lecture topics include techniques of observation and experiments in,animal behavior. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in principles of ecology and genetics or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
Graduate
BIOL 593
Comm & Ecosys Dynamics
An in-depth approach to the structure, function, and dynamics of ecological systems at community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics such as niche theory, the regulation of community structure, food w,ebs, ecological stability, diversity, succession, and energy and material cycles. Laboratory will emphasize field-based descriptive and investigative studies of local communities and ecosystems. Three lecture and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites,: BIOL 202 or equivalent is required. A basic statistics course is highly desirable. Fall, even-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 594
Population Biology
This course deals with the empirical, experimental, and theoretical aspects of the structure, growth, and evolution of biological populations. The course will take a holistic approach to how population genetics and population ecology interact to prod,uce observed population structure and dynamics. Two hours lecture/discussion and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, MATH 260, or permission of the instructor. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
Graduate
BIOL 597
Evolutionary Ecology
This course explores contemporary topics as well as landmark contributions in ecology and evolutionary biology. These topics are explored by readings of research and review papers. Three hours lecture/discussion weekly. Prerequisites: completion of c,ourses in each of the following: principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics; or permission of instructor.|
Graduate
BIOL 600
Special Prob In Biol
By permission.|
Graduate
BIOL 700
Research & Thesis
Prerequisite: Successful oral defense of prospectus seminar|
Graduate
COOP 308
Co-Op Biology
|
Undergraduate
COOP 408
Intrn-Biology
|
Undergraduate
ENVR 490
Sem In Environ & Society
Interdisciplinary seminar synthesizes knowledge and skills acquired in lower-division courses through unifying environmental studies. Broad theme offers a variety of dimensions for study and research. Bases studies and research around environmental s,ituations existing in this northwest region of Pennsylvania. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: Junior standing, ENVR 275, PHIL 212, ECON 202, plus nine additional hours of environment and society courses, or consent of ins,tructor. Spring, annually.|
Undergraduate
ENVR 500
Graduate Sem In Environ Sci
A survey of current literature, concepts, theory, and applications from selected fields of environmental science. One to two discussion hours weekly. By arrangement. Fall and Spring, yearly.|
Graduate
ENVR 501
Environ Sci Internship
Internships provide practical experiences that are related to a student?s academic program or research area. Credits earned can be utilized as partial fulfillment of the Master of Science degree in biology. Students considering internship credits to,be applied toward the Master of Science degree must have the approval of their graduate advisory committee, the cooperating agency, and the appropriate university administrators. On demand.|
Graduate
ENVR 600
Spec Problems In Environ Sci
Advanced topics in environmental science. The professor selects the format most suitable to the study. Course offered on request of students, subject to availability of staff. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On demand.|
Graduate
ENVR 700
Research & Thesis Environ Sci
Independent research project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty member. Required of all students working toward the thesis option Master of Science in Biology, Environmental Science concentration. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On,demand.|
Graduate
MARS 341
Marine Biology
Deals briefly with the history of marine biology, and with the interrelationship of chemical and physical oceanography and marine biology. Marine habitats will be studied in more detail with reference to the adaptations of plant and animal inhabitan,ts. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MARS 345
Marine Ornithology
An introductory course on the bird fauna of the sea coast, including avian diversity and ecology. Students will learn to identify coastal birds using plumage, behavior and songs. Lecture material will include information on distribution, behavior,,physiology and anatomy of birds. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MARS 360
Marine Ecology
Interrelationships among animals, plants, and physical and chemical aspects of the environment will be studied, with an emphasis on adaptations for survival which are unique to the marine environment. Zoogeography and food chain interactions will al,so be studied with some emphasis placed on the impacts of human activities. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MARS 403
Research Diver Methods
Study and practice of aquatic research methods using SCUBA as a tool. Advanced research diving topics include areas such as navigation, search and recovery, underwater photography, survey methods, estimating population parameters, and data acquisiti,on while under water. Specific research techniques will be presented in the context of specific aquatic research project conducted by students under the director of the instructor. Each summer.|
Undergraduate
MARS 431
Ecology Of Marine Plankton
Study of the phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine and brackish environments. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons will be made between the planktonic populations of various types of habitats in relation to primary and secondary productivity., Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MARS 443
Marine Ichthyology
Study of the internal and external structure of fishes, their classification and evolutionary relationships, their ecology and behavior, their physiology and environmental requirements, and their distribution patterns in marine and brackish environme,nts. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MARS 471
Scan Electron Microscop Marine
Trains students in the use of a portable scanning electron microscope (PSEMII), including principles of operation and use the SEM, preparation of geological and biological samples for imaging, size and shape analysis, and elemental and mineralogical,analysis with the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). The latter portion of the course is dedicated to the design and execution of independent research projects in investigating a problem in marine science using the SEM and/or EDX. Course ta,ught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
Undergraduate
MT 401
Clin Micro
Explores identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. Presents techniques to isolate, stain, culture, and determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Includes instrumentation and quality control.|
Undergraduate
MT 402
Clin Chem
Examines enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, metabolism of nitrogenous end products, physiology and metabolism of fluids and electrolytes, and toxicology as related to the body and diseases. Includes colorim,etry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, automation, and quality control.|
Undergraduate
MT 403
Clin Hemo
Analyzes the composition and functions of blood; diseases related to blood disorders; the role of platelets and coagulation. Includes manual and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities.|
Undergraduate
MT 404
Clin Imm
Examines blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic tests. Includes an in-depth study of blood donor service and its many facets such as transfusions, medico-legal aspects, etc.|
Undergraduate
MT 405
Clin Imm/Serv
Explores immune response, immunoglobulins, autoimmunity and complement, and related tests and diseases. Includes survey and demonstration of serological diagnostic tests.|
Undergraduate
MT 406
Clin Seminar
Other courses which are not included in the above (such as orientation, laboratory management, education, clinical microscopy) are unique to the individual hospital program.|
Undergraduate