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Course Directory

:: Course Offerings

The course offerings at Clarion University of PA go through an extensive review process by the Committee on Courses and Programs of Study (CCPS).  This course offerings list is a comprehensive list of courses that could be offered; it does not mean they are currently being offered.

For a complete list of courses offered on the current or upcoming schedules, see the Registrar's page Schedule of Classes.

To start a new search enter the course number of the subject or title you are searching in the box below.



Course Id (currently sorted in Ascending order) Course TitleCourse Description
ACTG 201
Intro Accounting Survey
Introduces accounting, the language of business. Emphasizes accounting terminology, concepts, and the interpretation and use of accounting information for decision-making. Designed for non-business freshman students only. May not be used to satisfy c,ore or major requirements for degrees in business administration. Students who have passed ACTG 251 may not schedule this course. No prerequisite. Each semester.|
ACTG 251
Financial Actg
Examines the principles and procedures for collecting, recording, summarizing, and reporting financial information. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing only at Clarion Campus. Each semester. Fall, annually at Venango.|
ACTG 252
Managerial Actg
Analyzes aspects of accounting that aid managers. Includes budgeting, cost behavior and systems, alternate choice decisions, international accounting aspects, and cash flow. Prerequisites: Sophomore standing only at Clarion Campus, and ACTG 251. Each, semester. Spring, annually at Venango.|
ACTG 253
Factory Actg
Presents fundamental accounting concepts and techniques applied in record keeping and accounting control of the production process. Prerequisite: ACTG 252. Spring, annually, Venango only.|
ACTG 254
Payroll Actg
Provides detailed coverage of payroll policy, records, wage calculation, deductions, and government reporting. Emphasizes tax form preparation. Prerequisite: ACTG 252. Fall, annually, Venango only.|
ACTG 255
Fin Stmt Prep & Analysis
Focuses on procedures for financial statement preparation and the use of accounting information as a basis for decision making by management, owners, creditors, and other users of financial statements. Prerequisite: ACTG 251. Spring, annually, Venango, only.|
ACTG 256
Income Tax Proc/Forms
Explains which types of income are taxable and which expenses are deductible. Covers both filling out and filing individual, partnership, and corporate tax returns. Prerequisite: ACTG 251. Fall, annually, Venango only.|
ACTG 350
Inter Actg
Explores accounting theory and practice. Includes accounting for current assets, investments, plant and equipment, and intangibles. Emphasizes developing the student's technical and problem-solving ability. Prerequisite: ACTG 252. Each semester.|
ACTG 351
Actg Equities
Examines accounting theory and practice. Includes accounting for current and long-term liabilities, corporate equity, pension plans, long-term leases, income taxes, accounting changes, and cash flows. Emphasizes developing the student's technical and, problem-solving ability. Prerequisite: ACTG 350 or consent of instructor. Each semester.|
ACTG 352
Cost Actg
Analyzes cost principles, procedures, systems, controls, and analysis. Considers standard cost systems with the two basic cost accounting systems. Stresses cost accounting as a tool for management decision-making based on management information syste,ms. Includes flexible budgets, accounting for by-products and joint products, transfer pricing, and environmental costs. Prerequisite: ACTG 252. Each semester.|
ACTG 353
Federal Taxes
Examines federal income, estate, and gift taxation. Considers problems of compliance with the law by individuals, partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. Prerequisite: ACTG 252. Each semester.|
ACTG 354
Auditing
A study of the purposes, the ethical and legal environment, financial analysis, and selected auditing techniques and procedures. Emphasizes developing the student's technical writing ability. Prerequisite: ACTG 351. Each semester.|
ACTG 451
Actg Problems
A problem-oriented study of topics most often tested on the CPA exam. Includes inventory methods, long-term contracts, partnership, leases, consignments, installment sales, receivership, fiduciary accounting, and governmental accounting. Preparation,s for the practice portion of the CPA exam are emphasized. Prerequisite: ACTG 350. Spring Semester.|
ACTG 452
Adv Cost Actg
A study of advanced concepts of cost accounting to provide useful quantitative information for decision-making. Includes inventory valuation, cost allocations, joint-product costs, process costing, accounting systems, profit center costs, and segment, performance measuring. Prerequisite: ACTG 352.|
ACTG 453
Prob Fed Tax Actg
Examines federal income tax concepts and compliance problems of partnerships, corporations, estates, and trusts. Briefly considers Social Security, estate, and gift taxation. Prerequisite: ACTG 353.|
ACTG 454
Comparative Actg Systems
Helps students develop a holistic approach to the concepts and practices for the examination and exploration of accounting systems. Discusses specialized accounting systems in detail, depending on the interest and desires of students. Prerequisites:,ACTG 251, 252, 350, 351, 354, CIS 223, and 301.|
ACTG 455
Not For Profit Entities
A study of the principles and practices of budgeting and accounting for activities of entities that are operated for purposes other than making profits. Prerequisite: ACTG 351.|
ACTG 456
Advanced Actg
Considers modern development in accounting, including recent studies and pronouncements by accounting authorities such as the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and the Securities and Exchange Commission. Analyzes the problems of acco,unting for consolidation and partnership equity. Emphasizes developing the student's technical and problem-solving abilities. Prerequisite: ACTG 351. On demand.|
ACTG 461
International Actg
Studies the influence of cultural values on the practice and theory of accounting and developing sensitivity to the differences and similarities of different accounting systems. Includes consolidation, translation of foreign currency statements, infl,ation, replacement cost accounting of global-oriented corporations and harmonization of accounting standards. Prerequisite: ACTG 252.|
ACTG 463
Tax Planning
Acquaints students with tax planning techniques that can be used to accomplish an individual's financial goals. Enables students to suggest actions that fit the individual's financial priorities based on an understanding of financial position, cash f,low and income, gift and estate tax matters. Prerequisite: ACTG 353.|
ACTG 490
Current Actg Pron
A research study of current Financial Accounting Standards Board statements of standards, interpretations, concepts, exposure drafts, and discussion memorandums. The internship experience and related research topics will be presented, discussed, and,integrated with the pronouncements. Prerequisite: COOP 420, Accounting Internship.|
ACTG 499
Special Topics In Actg
Presents various current topics affecting accounting practice and theory. Covers different topics from year to year as subjects of importance are identified. Prerequisite: ACTG 351 or consent of instructor.|
ACTG 500
Financial Actg
A study of the principles and procedures for collecting, recording, summarizing, and reporting financial information. Each semester.|
ACTG 552
Management Accounting
A graduate course for non-accounting majors which deals with the application of concepts and tools of accounting analysis necessary for planning, control, and decision-making functions of national and multinational organizations. Topics include finan,cial statement analysis and interpretation, budgeting, standards, and forecasting. Prerequisites: ACTG 251 and ACTG 252.|
ACTG 554
Advanced Auditing
An advanced study of current topics in auditing. The course is intended to develop more complex issues than those encountered in an introductory auditing course. Topics include current audit influences, special problems with audit reports, SEC practi,ce, computer auditing, and related topics. Prerequisite: ACTG 354 (or its equivalent).|
ACTG 650
Theory Of Accounts
A study of past and contemporary accounting theories. The course is concerned with the historical development of accounting and its evolution to present times. Present-day accounting concepts are critically examined from the standpoint of how well th,ey serve the needs of those who use the products of accounting. Prerequisite: ACTG 351 (or its equivalent) or permission of the instructor.|
ACTG 652
Advanced Manag Actg
A study of complex problems in cost accounting. Use of cost accounting as a tool for managerial control is emphasized. Prerequisite: ACTG 352 (or its equivalent) or permission of the instructor.|
ACTG 653
Research Fed Taxation
A study of federal tax law emphasizing the underlying philosophy of the law. Research procedures and techniques in the handling of complicated problems in tax practice and tax planning will be set forth. Prerequisite: ACTG 453 (or its equivalent) or,permission of the instructor.|
AE 10
Prep For College Math
Covers basic arithmetic and geometic principles necessary for the subsequent study of introductory algebra and other more advanced courses requiring a basic mathematics competency. Emphasizes decreasing mathematics anxiety, developing mathematics tex,t-reading abilities, including the study of vocabulary unique to the mathematics discipline, developing estimation skills, interpreting data, mental mathematics, and critical thinking. Major learning modalities are written response, calculator use an,d experimentation, analysis activities, and problem-solving.|
AE 91
CU Trans: Exploration 2
The goal of Explorations is to help students stay in college and develop permanent ties with Clarion University through curricular and co-curricular programming that: cements students' and families's commitment to Clarion University; forges positive, and active relationships among students, and among students, faculty and staff; guides family members as they support their students during transition from home to college and from college to work; ensures that students are informed self advocates w,ho accept personal responsibility for their education; and engages students in productive co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.|
AE 100
College Read Study Skills
Develops reading, writing, research, and study skills needed at the college level. Intended for underclass students only. Emphasizes application of these skills to courses students are studying. No prerequisite. Each semester.|
AE 101
CU Trans: Exploration 1
The goal of Explorations is to help students stay in college and develop permanent ties with Clarion University through curricular and co-curricular programming that: cements students' and families's commitment to Clarion University; forges positive, and active relationships among students, and among students, faculty and staff; guides family members as they support their students during transition from home to college and from college to work; ensures that students are informed self advocates w,ho accept personal responsibility for their education; and engages students in productive co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.|
AE 102
CU Trans: Exploration 2
The goal of Explorations is to help students stay in college and develop permanent ties with Clarion University through curricular and co-curricular programming that: cements students' and families's commitment to Clarion University; forges positive, and active relationships among students, and among students, faculty and staff; guides family members as they support their students during transition from home to college and from college to work; ensures that students are informed self advocates w,ho accept personal responsibility for their education; and engages students in productive co-curricular and extra-curricular activities.|
AE 103
CU Trans: First Year Experienc
A co-curricular offering for first-year students. Intended to acquaint students with many aspects and resources of Clarion University. Students will explore and understand themselves interacting in a higher-education environment, identify and utili,ze campus resources and develop strategies to facilitate learning. The intent is to forge positive active relationships among students, faculty, and staff, help students be informed self-advocates, and engage in co-curricular and extra-curricular ac,tivities, which will enhance personal growth and education.|
AE 110
The Student In The Univ
This course is desinged to (1) enable freshman students to explore and understand themselves as developing adults interacting in a higher education environment; (2) identify and/or utilize campus and community resources that will enhance their academ,ic program; (3) develop strategies to facilitate the learning process; and (4) apply those strategies in a practical manner in order to build upon a resource base for academic skill transference. Note: This course is designed for freshman students o,nly and is a general elective under personal development and life skills. Each semester.|
AE 260
Career Explor & Plan
Focuses on the career planning process that involves: (a) career awareness--students learn to examine the world of work and the occupational alternatives available; (b) self study--students learn to examine their own personalities, interests, needs,,achievements, abilities, and values when developing a personal career plan; and (c) career decision-making--students learn to practice the skills necessary to make prudent occupational choices and set realistic goals.|
AE 261
Stu Serv & Civic Engagement
This is a class for students interested in enhancing their connection to both the university and greater community by promoting the values of service and civic involvement. Using a service-learning design, students will be developing their prevocati,onal skills and personal values through volunteer activities in leadership positions in Recognized Student Organizations (R.S.O.'s) within the university and greater community. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.|
AE 361
Prof Dev: Ldrshp & Life Skills
AE 361 Transitions Professional Development (Leadership/Life Skills) is a .5 credit co-curricular course targeted to juniors and seniors. Its primary goal is to ensure that Clarion students have the knowledge, skills, and experiences needed to be su,ccessful in experiential learning situations, the job search, the graduate/professional school admissions process, and the workplace. Prerequisite: JR or SR standing|
AE 362
Prof Dev: Job Srch/Grad Sch Pl
AE 362 Transitions Professional Development (Job Search/Graduate School Planning) is a .5 credit co-curricular course targeted to juniors and seniors. Its primary goal is to ensure that Clarion students have the knowledge, skills, and experiences ne,eded to be successful in experiential learning situations, the job search, the graduate/professional school admissions process, and the workplace. Prerequisite: Jr. or Sr. Standing|
AH 101
Medical Terminology
Teaches principles of medical word building that support understanding and use of the language of medicine and also enhance understanding of the English language. Includes study of medical term components, medical abbreviations, specialized terminol,ogy related to body systems and related pathology, diagnostic examinations, clinical and laboratory procedures, oncology, and phamacology. Students will apply their knowledge of and skills in medical terminology to speak, read, and write the languag,e of medicine and to understand health care information as a future helathcare provider, patient, and caregiver. Open to both health care majors and non health care majors. Fall, annually and in other academic terms as needed.|
AH 201
Introduction to Health Care
This course will familiarize students with health care organizations, the health care system, and the clinical environment in relationship to the student's role as a future health care practitioner. Topics will include the structure, organization, a,nd function of hospital systems and staff; documentation and medical records; professional development and professionalism; the role and function of professional societies and membership; safety and emergency response; body mechanics; HIPAA; infectio,n control; communication in the health care environment in relationship to continuum of care; ethical and legal responsibilities of health care practitioners; current trends in health care; and employment opportunities for health care professionals.|
AH 290
Allied Health Clinical I
Within the Associate of Science in Allied Health degree program, AH 290 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the Am,erican Medical Association. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 299
Allied Health Clinical II
Within the Associate of Science in Allied Health degree program, AH 299 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the Am,erican Medical Association. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 300
Allied Health Clinical III
Within the Associate of Science in Allied Health degree program, AH 300 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the Am,erican Medical Association. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 310
Allied Health Clinical IV
Within the Associate of Science in Allied Health degree program, AH 310 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the Am,erican Medical Association. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 400
Allied Health Clinical VII
Within the Department of Allied Health, AH 400 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the American Medical Associatio,n. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 401
Allied Health Leader Capstone
Exploration and execution of health care leadership and management concepts and health care information literacy practices in relation to health care clinical environments. Students will apply knowledge and skills acquired in their college and clini,cal experiences to reflect on real world health care leadrship situations and challenges. A review of health care information literacy practices will aid students in locating, evaluating, and using scholarly healthcare literature that will inform,their functioning as entry-level health care leaders. Prerequisite(s): 1) In final year of a baccalaureate-level health care program in the Department of Allied Health and, 2) completion or near completion of an allied health clinical program.|
AH 410
Allied Health Clinical VIII
Within the Department of Allied Health, AH 410 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the American Medical Associatio,n. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
AH 420
Allied Health Clinical IX
Within the Department of Allied Health, AH 420 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 15 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program in a health profession that is recognized by the American Medical Associatio,n. The clinical program of study must entail a minimum of 450 contact hours.|
ANTH 211
Humans And Culture
Introduces students to the nature of humanity and the human condition by exploring contemporary and past societies. Applies the four-field approach, emphasizing human diversity, origins of humans and culture, language, and archaeology. Each semeste,r.|
ANTH 213
Intro To Bioanthropology
Surveys the human species in time, place, and culture, and investigates factors underlying human variation. Prerequisite: ANTH 211, or one semester in Biology. Alternate years.|
ANTH 214
Prin Human Ecology
Examines the functional interrelationships of humankind and the biophysical environment. No prerequisite. Alternate years.|
ANTH 216
Women And Culture
Introduces the study of the lives of women in cross-cultural perspective. Explores gender issues including sexual division of labor, inequality, changing position of women in families, and the role of women in development. Alternate years.|
ANTH 217
Intro to Archaeology
Introduces students to theory and methods used in archaeological inquiry. Explores the history of archaeology, key researchers in the field, and important discoveries.|
ANTH 218
Buried Cities & Lost Civ
Introduces students to archaeology and to what archaeologists do. Provides a long-term perspective on human history starting with the first archaeological sites over 2.5 million years old. Addresses some of the more popular theories about the prehist,oric human past. Alternate years.|
ANTH 242
Intro To Amer Folklore
Introduces the major genres of American folklore: legend, tale, folk belief, song and ballad, and material folk culture; and various folk groups in America: occupational, gender, ethnic, age, regional, and their traditions. Analyzes examples of Am,erican literature and American popular culture through an examination of their American folk elements. Provides students with fieldwork experiences and methods of analysis of oral, customary, and material traditions. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
ANTH 245
Peoples & Cult Of Latin Amer
Introduces the rich variety of ethnic groups and cultures of contemorary Latin America, including Central and South America. Topics will include social structures, economic organization, gender roles, religion, political systems, ethnic identity, an,d globalization. Focus will be on indigenous peoples, with an emphasis on their role in national societies and the international economy.|
ANTH 250
Prehistoric N America
Examines the development of North American Indian cultures from the beginning of human migration in the late Pleistocene to the coming of Europeans. Emphasizes human interrelationships with the various New World environments in time and space which l,ed to the rise of prehistoric cultures, food production, trade, etc. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
ANTH 251
Historic Indians N Amer
Surveys American Indians ethnographically. Explores cultural processes, historic events, and ecological adjustments to understand the diversity of Indian culture at the time of their discovery by Europeans. Considers American Indian acculturation and, contemporary Indian issues. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
ANTH 253
Arch East N America
Provides detailed survey of prehistoric developments in North America east of the Mississippi from Late Pleistocene to the Colonial Period. Familiarizes students with the prehistory of the Amerind populations in the area, including the gradual emerge,nce of the Woodland pattern. On demand.|
ANTH 254
Language And Culture
An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Focuses on the main areas of intersection between language and culture. Topics may include: animal communication systems; primate language studies, the evolution of language; linguistic diversity; lingui,stic relativity (a.k.a. the Sapir/Whorf hypothesis); language and identity; language and gender; and the ethnography of speaking. From an examination of such topics students will learn to see how people use language to create and maintain their cult,ures, and to recognize the ways in which language itself influences human thought and behavior.|
ANTH 262
Intro To Eng Lang
Deals generally with the nature of language and specifically with the grammatical structures of modern English, its regional and social varieties, and certain highlights of its historical development. Each semester.|
ANTH 300
Lab Meth In Archaeology
Provides a hands-on overview of the major analytical methods in archaeology and a basic understanding of both the practical application of standard methodologies, and the questions archaeologists address. Prerequisite: ANTH 211. Alternate years.|
ANTH 315
Ending Poverty
Introduces the field of development anthropology, including its applied aspects. Explores the history of development theory; models of cultural change; contemporary issues of poverty and globalization; models of program design. Provides students wi,th a practical background in project design, assessment, and management. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Alternate years|
ANTH 352
Topics In Folklore
Provides intense study of one or more aspects of folklore study. Focuses on one or more folk groups, a particular folk genre, folklore and popular culture, or folklore and literature. Offers students a fieldwork experience-collection, transcription,,classification-and methods of analysis of oral traditions. No prerequisite. Spring, annually.|
ANTH 357
Aztec, Inca, & Their Ancestors
Surveys Indian cultures from the beginnings in the Late Pleistocene to the coming of the Conquistadors. Emphasizes cultural developments, the rise of states, native agriculture, and the development of arts and crafts, including architecture and cerem,onial art. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
ANTH 358
World Prehistory
This course covers the cultural development of humanking from the Lower Paleolithic to the beginnings of urbanism in the Bronze and Iron Age. The course examines human development in Europe, Africa, Asia, and the New World; draws comparisons beween,cultures; studies the diffusion of cultural traits; and summarizes recent developments in research. No prerequisite. Every second year.|
ANTH 361
Witchcraft, Magic, Rel
Provides cross cultural comparative analysis of human environment with the supernatural. Explores the role of religion and theories dealing with the nature and function of various aspects of supernaturalism from an anthropological perspective. No pre,requisite. Every second year.|
ANTH 362
Hist and Meth of Anth
Provides a general overview of the history of anthropology as an academic discipline, combined with a survey of anthropological theory and research methods. Alternative years. Anth 211 plus at least 3 additional credits in anthropology, or permission, of instructor.|
ANTH 364
American Voices
Provides an introduction to American dialectology and sociolinguistics. Emphasizes the great diversity and vitality of American English. Covers the causes and mechanisms of linguistic changes, the role of language differences in society, and the rele,vance of dialectology to language teaching. Pays special attention to the regional speech patterns of Pennsylvania. No prerequisite. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ANTH 366
Race & Ethnic Relations
Background of racial and ethnic identity. Examines contemporary aspects of inter-ethnic and inter-racial group relations. Considers proposals for alleviating and resolving problems and their implications. Prerequisite: SOC 211 or permission of the in,structor. Once annually.|
ANTH 374
Research Seminar In Anth
Investigates how to research, write, and present a substantive anthropological project. Each student will work on an individualized project by developing a research design, performing background research, collecting and analyzing data, and writing a, formal paper that will be presented in class. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing. Spring, alternate years|
ANTH 375
Archaeological Field Sch
Provides undergraduates with a practical and technical background in modern archaeological research. Includes an introduction to cultural contexts. Covers all phases of field investigation, including site reconnaissance, site survey and testing, site, mapping, controlled excavation, specimen recovery techniques, and information regarding procedures. Includes laboratory methods such as catalog and preservation procedures.|
ANTH 376
Adv Arch Field School
Provides students with additional training in archaeological field methods. Students obtain supervisory skills and experience in site interpretation and report writing. Students will also learn applied archaeological (Cultural Resources Management), field techniques. ANTH 376 is offered concurrently with ANTH 375. Prerequisite: ANTH 375.|
ANTH 380
Language And Culture
An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Focuses on the main areas of intersection between language and culture. Topics may include: animal communication systems; primate language studies; the evolution of language; linguistic diversity; linguis,tic relativity (a.k.a. the Sapir/Whorf Hypothesis); language endangerment and revival; nonverbal communication; linguistic field methods; ethnopoetics; sociolinguistics; language and identity; language and gender; and the ethnography of speaking. Fr,om an examination of such topics, students will learn to see how people use language to create and maintain their cultures, and to recognize the ways in which language itself influences human thought and behavior.|
ANTH 400
Individual Research
Allows students to develop their approach to a specific problem, by conducting individual research defined in conference with the instructor. Regular sessions with the faculty member in charge evaluate the progress of the work and chart its direction,. Students expected to acquire research techniques in dealing with their topics. All branches of anthropology may be used to select a topic. Credit and grades will be given only if the project (term paper, survey, investigation, etc.) has been comple,ted to the satisfaction of the project advisor and the departmental chair. Prerequisite: ANTH 211. On demand.|
ANTH 425
Field School Cultural Anth
Provides students with field experience in cultural anthropology. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experience of ethnographic fieldwork. Focus is on research design, qualitative methodology, and communication results of research. Prerequisite: At, least 6 credits in anthropology, or permission of instructor.|
ANTH 426
Spec Topics Biol Anth & Arch
Focuses on a single topic of interest in Biological Anthropology and Archaeology. Course content varies. Topic will be announced in advance. Prerequisite: ANTH 211 or permission of instructor.|
ANTH 427
Special Topics In Cult Anth
Focuses on a single topic of interest in cultural and/or linguistic anthropology. Course content varies. Topic will be announced in advance. Prerequisite: ANTH 211 or permission of instructor.|
ANTH 457
Intro To Linguistics
Presents key concepts and basic analytical procedures common to many contemporary linguistics theories. Covers phonetics and phonology, morphology, and syntax in detail. Analyzes the integration of these sub-systems in the overall design of a generat,ive grammar. Prerequisite: ANTH/ENG 262. Fall, annually.|
APT 299
Applied Tech Field Training
Performance-oriented field training in technical fields using industrial machines and computers. Includes math and blueprint skills, sufficient to operate various complex machine, tooling or computer equipment. Analyzes and troubleshoots the proble,ms of production. Emphasis is on developing student competency in equipment operation and troubleshooting. Credit only for students enrolled in the AAS-IT degree.|
APT 301
Issues in Applied Technology
This capstone course to the Associate of Applied Science in Industrial Technology degree will prepare students for the career opportunities that exist upon graduation. Students will apply extensive technical writing and oral presentations to practic,al applications that exist in the workplace. Research in the field of industrial technology will take place, along with research into career development and job procurement. Problem solving activites related to industrial situations will be present,ed and analyzed, as well as current topics in industrial technology. Offered Each semester.|
ART 121
Foundation Drawing
Develops the drawing skills of students. Emphasizes observation, analysis, basic pictorial composition, and spatial organization. Students draw primarily from direct observation, exploring a variety of drawing media, processes, and attitudes. Require,d of all art majors. Each semester.|
ART 124
Digital Art Foundations
This course will introduce students to basic computer software and hardware related to the creation, documentation, and presentation of art. The course looks at digital media as an investigative and creative tool in art and design, and as a method of, communication. Topics and programs covered include, but are not limited to, digital photography, scanning, Photoshop, and PowerPoint. Fall and Spring semesters annually|
ART 125
Color And Design
A study of two-dimensional design concepts and their applications. Emphasizes the principles and elements of design. Required of all art majors. Fall Semester and on demand.|
ART 126
3-D Design
Explores three-dimensional design forms to gain a deeper understanding of the elements and principles of design. Required of all art majors. Spring Semester.|
ART 190
Teach Art Elem Grades
Analyzes the place of art in the elementary school curriculum, and provides the skills and knowledge needed to teach art. Develops classroom planning, presentation, motivation methods, and lesson plans in workshops or actual teaching situations. Each, semester.|
ART 218
Intro To Hist Of Photography
Surveys the history of photography from 1827 to the present. Developments in photographic processes, styles and movements in photography, and the work of individual photographers will be covered. This class is aimed at art students and also at stud,ents from a variety of disciplines who are interested in art, history, or modes of visual representation.|
ART 222
Drawing Concepts
Continues exploration of a variety of drawing media and techniques in order to solve more complex pictorial and spatial problems. Encourages development of individualized responses. Offered concurrently with ART 121. Prerequisites: ART 121, 122. Each, semester.|
ART 223
Figure Drawing II
Continues exploring the figure and its expressive potential. In-depth analysis of anatomy, including musculature and surface features. Expanded media and problem solving. Offered concurrently with ART 122. Prerequisites: ART 121, 122. Spring Semester,.|
ART 224
Figure Drawing I
Develops students' knowledge of human anatomy. Emphasizes an intuitive approach to recording the figure. Students work directly from the skeleton and models, analyzing the figure, and exploring a variety of media and pictorial problems. Required of a,ll art majors. Spring Semester.|
ART 228
Intro to Jewelry
This course provides initial experiences in and an overview of traditional and contemporary jewelry design, materials, forming, fabricating, and surfacing processes and techniques against a background of contemporary and historical applications.|
ART 230
Intro to Ceramics
This course provides initial experiences in traditional hand building and wheel forming techniques and an introduction to and overview of ceramic technology and processes against a background of contemporary and historical developments and applicatio,ns.|
ART 240
Intro to Weaving & Fabric Des
This course provides an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of textile design. Through group and individual projects, demonstrations, lectures, and readings, students will learn several traditional textile construction and design techni,ques, and they will gain an understanding of textile art history. Each semester.|
ART 246
Illustration II
Utilizes skills and knowledge acquired from Level I to produce portfolio quality pieces. Emphasizes the creative process and advanced software knowledge. Offered concurrently with ART 145. Prerequisite: ART 145. Fall Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 250
Intro to Graphic Design
Introduces graphic design, typography, and computer graphic modes and functions. Focuses on state-of-the-art industry software and creativity. Each semester.|
ART 256
Graphic Des & Comp II
Continues exploring layout, typography, and computer graphics. Students build on the skills and knowledge acquired from Level I to produce portfolio quality pieces. Emphasizes advanced computer software techniques. Offered concurrently with ART 155.,Prerequisite: ART 155. Spring Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 260
Intro To Painting
Introduction to oil painting. Students explore basic materials and techniques of painting. Stresses fundamentals of pictorial organization and visual expression; includes introduction to Contemporary and Art Historical painting. Prerequisite: Art, 121 or ART 110. Each semester|
ART 265
Printed & Dyed Fabr II
|
ART 270
Intro to Printmaking
This course provides an introduction to the history, theory, and practice of printmaking. Through group and individual projects, demonstrations, lectures, and readings, students will learn several traditional printmaking techniques, and they will ga,in an understanding of printmaking history as well as critical theory that surrounds the medium.|
ART 280
Intro to Sculpture
This course introduces students to a variety of sculptural materials, methods, and concepts as a viable contemporary practice. This course concentrates on the basics of sculptural form building, with an emphasis on spatial awareness and problem solv,ing.|
ART 282
Jewelry II
Continues study in the design and construction of jewelry pieces. Students continue advancing their skills and knowledge of metals, stones, woods, and other materials. Prerequisite: ART 181. Annually.|
ART 300
Special Topics
Topics of interest in various areas of art. The instructor selects the format. Offered when faculty available.|
ART 330
Intermediate Ceramics
This course facilitates the refinement of hand building techniques and throwing skills in conjunction with formal and conceptual considerations. Clay body formulation and glaze calculation, development and testing are introduced while experience is g,ained in firing various kiln types. Emphasis is placed on continuing aesthetic and technical development and the ability to critically evaluate an individualized approach to form function and content. Prerequiste: ART 230. Fall and Spring annually|
ART 340
Interm Weaving & Fabric Des
This course offers students the opportunity to discover the possibilities of textile media as a viable contemporary practice. Print, dye, woven, and off-loom techniques will be taught. Through group and individual projects, demonstrations, lecture,s, and readings, students will be asked to consider the varied potential of textile art for visual communciations. Prerequisite: ART 125, ART 240. Fall or Spring annually|
ART 347
Illustration III
Incorporates all previous knowledge acquired in Levels I and II. Encourages students to develop their personal aesthetic and to produce portfolio quality pieces. Offered concurrently with ART 145. Prerequisite: ART 246. Fall Semester, annually, or on, demand.|
ART 350
Intrm Graphic Des I - Typgr
Continues exploring layout, typography, and computer graphics. Students build on the skills and knowledge acquired from Introduction to Graphic Design to produce a professional portfolio. Emphasizes advanced computer software techniques and typogra,phy. Prerequisite: ART 250 Introducation to Graphic Design. Fall semester annually|
ART 351
Intrm Graphic Des II - Photo
This course incorporates all previous knowledge acquired in Introduction to Graphic Design and Graphic Design I - Typography. Coursework is based on student-initiated projects, independent research, and professional development. Students are expect,ed to be self-motivated and capable of working in an interdisciplinary and mature fashion. Prerequisite: ART 350 Graphic Design I - Typography. Spring semester annually|
ART 355
Illustration
Entry-level studio course introduces students to a variety of drawing and painting media. Industry standard computer software is also taught. Encourages utilization of the principles of design, creative problem-solving, and the integration of illus,trations into media. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Spring semester annually|
ART 357
Graphic Des & Comp III
Incorporates all previous knowledge acquired in Levels I and II, including proficiency in advanced software. Encourages students to develop their personal direction and to produce portfolio quality pieces. Offered concurrently with ART 155. Prerequis,ite: ART 256. Spring Semester or on demand.|
ART 360
Intermediate Painting
Encourages integration of conceptual concerns and thematic focus in painting. Experimentation with subject and materials; working toward developing a personal aesthetic direction in relation to Contemporary art. Regular critiques and assignments.,Prerequisite: ART 260. Each semester|
ART 370
Intermediate Printmaking
This course offers students the opportunity to discover the possibilities of print media as a viable contemporary practice. Students will explore ways that photographic, mechanical, and electronic tools have influenced both artistic production and t,he dissemination of art. Through group and individual projects, demonstrations, lectures, and readings, students will be asked to consider the varied potential of the two-dimensional multiple for visual communication. Screenprinting, photo-litho, p,hoto-etching, and transfer/copier processes are introduced. Prerequisite: ART 124, ART 270. Spring semester annually|
ART 380
Intermediate Sculpture
This course introudces students to a variety of sculptural materials, methods, and concepts as a viable contermporary practice. Coursework and projects produced are self-governed with a strong focus on artistic value, conceptual clarity, and cultura,l and art historical contexts. Through group and individual projects, demonstrations, lectures, and readings, students will be asked to consider the varied potentials of sculptural form. Prerequisite: ART 126, ART 280. Fall or Spring semester ann,ually|
ART 383
Jewelry III
Continues study of the design and creation of jewelry and metalwork, emphasizing development of an individual aesthetic through the use of multiple techniques and processes. Prerequisite: ART 282. Annually.|
ART 417
Latin American Art
A study of selected art traditions in the Spanish and Portuguese and French-speaking Western Hemisphere, including ancient, medieval and contemporary examples. Contributions of native, African, European, and other cultures will be considered. This,is a writing intensive course with frequent essays, hands-on art making processes, a research project, and a required museum field trip. The course may be offered on location in Central or South American or the Caribbean, and will become part of the, Latin American and Caribbean studies minor program. Visits and apprenticeships to artist' and artisans' workshops will be arranged when possible. Students who received credit for ART 217 may not subsequently enroll in ART 417/517.|
ART 426
Senior Drawing
Capstone course allows students concentrating in drawing to develop their work for the B.F.A. exhibit. Offered concurrently with other drawing courses. Prerequisites: ART 424 and 425. Each semester.|
ART 431
Advanced Ceramics
This course facilitates the development self-directed research and explorations, focusing on the creation and refinement of a cohesive body of work reflecting an individualized aesthetic based on the technical competency to actualize, the critical in,sight to evaluate, the verbal and writing skills to articulate, and the facility to professionally exhibit and document. Prerequisite: 6 Cr. Hr. of ART 330 - Intermediate Ceramics. Fall and Spring semester annually|
ART 441
Adv Weaving & Fabric Design
This course offers students the opportunity to further explore the possibilities of constructed and printed/dyed textile media as a viable contemporary practice. Coursework is based on student-initiated projects, independent research, and profession,al development. Students are expected to be self-motivated and capable of working in an interdisciplinary and mature fashion. Prerequisite: ART 340. Fall or Spring semester annually|
ART 448
Illustration IV
Encourages students to develop their personal aesthetic and produce portfolio quality pieces. Intermediate-level course emphasizes business aspects of illustration. Offered concurrently with ART 145. Prerequisite: ART 347. Fall Semester, annually, or, on demand.|
ART 449
Illustration V
Students develop a portfolio geared toward their particular skills and interests. Students entering this advanced-level course should have a solid creative and technical background in illustration. Students can seek their own clients at this time so,they have printed pieces in their professional portfolios. Offered concurrently with ART 145. Prerequisite: ART 448. Fall Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 450
Illustration VI
Students develop a portfolio geared toward their particular skills and interests. Students entering this advanced-level course should have a solid creative and technical background in illustration. Students can seek their own clients at this time so,they have printed pieces in their professional portfolios. Offered concurrently with ART 145. Prerequisite: ART 449. Fall Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 451
Advanced Graphic Design
This course incorporates all previous knowledge acquired in Introduction to Graphic Design and Graphic Design I - Typography and Graphic Design II - Photography. Coursework is based on student-initiated projects, independent research, and profession,al development. Students are expected to be self-motivated and capable of working in an interdisciplinary and mature fashion. The goal is a professional digital and hard-copy portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 351 Graphic Design II - Photography. Fall, and Spring semester annually|
ART 452
Advanced Illustration
Advanced studio course using a variety of drawing and painting media and industry standard computer software. Encourages use of the principles of design, creative problem-solving, and the integration of illustrations into media to create a professio,nal portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 355 - Illustration. Spring semester annually|
ART 458
Graphic Des & Comp IV
Encourages students to develop personal direction and produce portfolio quality pieces. Intermediate-level course explores software. Offered concurrently with ART 155. Prerequisite: ART 357. Spring Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 459
Graphic Des & Comp V
Students develop a portfolio geared toward their particular skills and interests. Students can seek their own clients at this time so they have printed pieces in their professional portfolios. Advanced-level course emphasizes advanced software compet,ency. Students should have a solid creative and technical background in computer graphics and graphic design. Offered concurrently with ART 155. Prerequisite: ART 458. Spring Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 460
Graphic Des & Comp VI
Professional portfolios are reviewed at the beginning of the course, and weak projects are replaced with higher quality pieces. Stresses business skills, especially promotional pieces. Students entering this advanced-level course should have a solid,creative and technical background in computer graphics and graphic design. Offered concurrently with ART 155. Prerequisite: ART 459. Spring Semester, annually, or on demand.|
ART 461
Advanced Painting
Integrating conceptual concerns and thematic focus in painting and working toward developing a personal aesthetic direction in relation to Contemporary art in preparation for BFA Exhibition. Regular critiques and assignments. Prerequisite: ART 360,. Each semester|
ART 464
Weaving & Fiber Scu IV
Advanced studio production and study of textile construction history and techniques; continued development of portfolio through regular critiques. Prerequisite: ART 363. Fall, annually, and on demand.|
ART 465
Weaving & Fiber Scu V
Preparation for B.F.A. exhibition and continued development of portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 464. Fall, annually, and on demand.|
ART 466
Weaving & Fiber Scu VI
Preparation for B.F.A. exhibition and continued development of portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 465. Fall, annually, and on demand.|
ART 468
Fabric Sur Des IV
Advanced studio production and study of surface design history and techniques; continued development of portfolio through regular critiques. Prerequisite: ART 367. Spring, annually, and on demand.|
ART 469
Fabric Sur Des V
Preparation for B.F.A. exhibition and continued development of portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 468. Spring, annually, and on demand.|
ART 470
Fabric Sur Des VI
Preparation for B.F.A. exhibition and continued development of portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 469. Spring, annually, and on demand.|
ART 471
Advanced Printmaking
This course offers students the opportunity to further explore the possibilities of print media as a viable contemporary practice. Coursework is based on student-initiated projects, independent research, and professional development. Students are e,xpected to be self-motivated and capable of working in an interdisciplinary and mature fashion. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. On demand.|
ART 474
Printmaking IV
Emphasizes development of individualized approaches to printmaking relevant to the student's personal aesthetic and conceptual interests. Students work with intaglio and silkscreen each fall semester, and lithography and relief each spring semester., Evidence of refined technical skills is expected. Prerequisite: ART 373. Each semester.|
ART 475
Printmaking V
Continuation of Printmaking IV. Emphasizes development of a cohesive portfolio. Prerequisite: ART 474. Each semester.|
ART 476
Printmaking VI
Continuation of Printmaking V. Focuses on preparation of the B.F.A. exhibition. Prerequisite: ART 475. Each semester.|
ART 481
Advanced Sculpture
This course offers students the opportunity to expand upon a variety of sculptural materials, methods, and concepts as a viable contemporary practice. Coursework and projects produced are self-governed, and should focus on artistic value, conceptual, clarity, and cultural and art historical contexts. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. Fall or Spring semester annually|
ART 491
Senior Seminar
This course involves preparation, research, proposal development, and studio exploration for the senior B.F.A. exhibition requirement or B.A. capstone project. Students will have the opportunity to present their research and artwork for discussion a,nd critique in a group environment. Focus will be placed on the preparation of a comprehensive portfolio,and forming a statement that incorporates the understanding one's work in relation to current works by mature artists. Prerequisite: The stude,nt must co-register with any 400-level studio class and Permission of Instructor. Fall semester annually|
ART 517
Latin American Art
A study of selected art traditions in the Spanish and Portuguese and French-speaking Western Hemisphere, including ancient, medieval and contemporary examples. Contributions of native, African, European, and other cultures will be considered. This,is a writing intensive course with frequent essays, hands-on art making processes, a research project, and a required museum field trip. The course may be offered on location in Central or South American or the Caribbean, and will become part of the, Latin American and Caribbean studies minor program. Visits and apprenticeships to artist' and artisans' workshops will be arranged when possible. Students who received credit for ART 217 may not subsequently enroll in ART 417/517.|
ARTH 110
Visual Arts
Introduces art appreciation. Deals with the form and content of art as well as the processes and products of art. Enriches the student's awareness and understanding of visual art forms. Each semester.|
ARTH 111
Survey Of World Art
Surveys art and architecture from around the world in its cultural context. Spring semester annually|
ARTH 215
African Trad In Art
Introduces traditional sculpture, masks, crafts, and other arts of selected Subsaharan African groups, and African American artists. Develops students' understanding of the meaning and cultural context of the art through hands-on experience in relat,ed art processes and a required museum trip. On demand.|
ARTH 216
Women In Art
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ARTH 217
Intro To Latin American Art
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ARTH 300
Special Topics In Art Hist
Topics of interest in various areas of art history. The instructor selects the format. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Offered on demand|
ARTH 312
Italian Renaissance Art
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ARTH 313
19th Century Art
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ARTH 314
20th Century Art
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ARTH 315
Oriental Art
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ARTH 317
Art/Arch Of Ancnt Greece
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ARTH 411
Modernism: Art 1850 - 1950
Surveys art and architecture of Europe and the United States between 1850 and 1950, its historical and cultural context, and its connection to concepts of modernity. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Fall semester, every two years|
ARTH 412
Changing Times: Art Of 60's
Surveys the art of the sixties, its historical and cultural context. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Spring semester every two years|
ARTH 414
Topics In Contemp Art
This course introduces contemporary art and theory. It covers art and artists from the 1960s to the present. This class deals with conceptual issues facing today's artists and introduces the main currents in contemporary critical theory. It is aim,ed at students who: 1) have a strong interest in contemporary art; 2) are interested in recent critical theory and its applications in visual art; 3) are artists or other students in the humanities planning to attend graduate school.|
AT 299
Admin Tech Field Training
AT 299 is performance oriented field training using software applications, productivity software, specialized office disciplines and procedures. The course includes continuous improvement and process reengineering skills, sufficient to manage a smal,l office, or certain specialized departments. Analyzes and troubleshoots the problems of daily operations. Emphasis is on developing student competency in operational troubleshooting and software applications. Credit only for students enrolled in,the AAS-AT degree.|
ATE 100
Practicum Athletic Training I
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ATE 110
Practicum Athletic Training II
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ATE 204
Athletic Trng Clinical Ed I
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ATE 225
Evaluation Techniques I
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ATE 265
Evaluative Tech II
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ATE 290
Therapeutic Mod Lab
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ATE 300
Adv Athletic Training Proc
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ATE 305
Athletic Trng Clinical Ed II
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ATE 315
General Medical Assessment
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ATE 330
Therapeutic Exercise
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ATE 400
Orthopedic Eval In Sports Med
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ATE 405
Athletic Trng Clinical Ed III
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ATE 425
Adm Strategies In Athletic Trn
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ATE 440
Pharmacology
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ATE 460
Sports Medicine Research
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ATSW 102
Credit For Athletic Particip
The student athlete must complete the full season of athletic participation in good standing with the student's varsity athletic program. Eligibility to register for this credit is not permitted until a student's second season of team participation.|
ATSW 150
Intro Athletic Training
Students learn about common injuries and illnesses associated with athletic populations, including introduction, rehabilitation, and treatment approaches for athletic injuries. Also addresses prevention and implications of athletic injuries. Every,spring.|
ATSW 160
Intro to Nutrition and Fitness
This course will introduce students to the Nutrition and Fitness major. Students will gain a better understanding of the professional disciplines, career opportunities, and college curriculum within the nutrition and fitness field. Students will begi,n to develop personal and career goals.|
ATSW 286
Cardio & Resist Train Tech
Students will explore the various methods of cardiovascular and resistance training. Appropriate training progression and safety will be emphasized. Topics include training for muscular strength, muscular endurance, and power. Students will learn how, to train both the aerobic and anaerobic athlete.|
ATSW 300
Emergency Med Tech
Students will be prepared to become certified as Emergency Medical Techncians. Emphasis is placed upon the care and treatment of the ill or injured in a variety of emergency situations. Prerequisite: 16 years of age.|
ATSW 333
Fitness For Wellness
Provides students with knowledge, skills, and strategies in stress management and health-related fitness. Stresses skills in psychophysiological regulation, exercise, and nutrition design. Emphasizes adherence issues of recognition, identification, a,nd remediation. Pre-requisite: successful completion of HPE 111 Health Education. Offered: annually, Fall.|
ATSW 334
Food, Fitness Wt Mgmt
Provides students with knowledge, skills, and strategies in diet management, both qualitatively and quantitatively. Emphasizes skills in personal dietary design and assessment. Also covers dietary needs and problems of special populations. Pre-requis,ite: successful completion of HPE 111 Health Education. stress management and health-related fitness. Stresses skills in psychophysiological regulation, exercise, and nutrition design|
ATSW 340
Nutrition Education
An overview of nutrition education that explores the settings in which nutrition education is carried out, introduces nutrition students to learning theory, and reviews techniques and resources for teaching nutrition. Students learn to assess the nee,ds of different learner groups and select and evaluate appropriate nutrition education materials. Prerequisite: CHEM 205.|
ATSW 350
Thy & Technique Of Coaching
Examines theories and techniques of coaching sports. Covers rules and regulations, fundamentals, organizational principles, specific conditioning programs scouting, technical tactics, and toher topics.|
ATSW 351
T&t Coach Basketball
Examines theories and techniques of coaching specific sports. Covers rules and regulations, fundamentals, organizational principles, specific conditioning programs, scouting, technical tactics and other topics. On demand.|
ATSW 352
T&t Of Baseball/Softball
Examines theories and techniques of coaching specific sports. Covers rules and regulations, fundamentals, organizational principles, specific conditioning programs, scouting, technical tactics and other topics. Fall, even-numbered years.|
ATSW 354
T&t Of Football
Examines theories and techniques of coaching specific sports. Covers rules and regulations, fundamentals, organizational principles, specific conditioning programs, scouting, technical tactics and other topics. Fall, even-numbered years.|
ATSW 370
Gender In Sports
Provides students with a comprehensive, multidisciplinary analysis of the problems, patterns, and processes associated with the involvement of women in sports.|
ATSW 380
Found Of Sports In Amer Scty
Covers the role of sports in American society. Includes examination of the fundamental changes in the organization, rules, management, finances, and ethos of sports. Also examines the social, cultural, economical, philosophical, and anthropological f,oundations that have shaped American sport. Every other semester.|
ATSW 406
Ath Inj: Prev, Recog Eva
Presents the latest information on prevention, recognition, and evaluation of athletic injuries. Students learn to coordinate appropriate emergency care as well as establish a professional working relationship with the qualified medical personnel who, assist an injured athlete's recovery. Students earn an American Red Cross AED/CPR certification upon successful completion of the course.|
ATSW 407
Phys Found Of Coaching
Study of the basic scientific principles of physiology and how they can be applied to conditioning programs for the athlete. Covers all phases of physical training, along with evaluation of modern training devices. Spring, annually.|
ATSW 408
Pr Pb Ath Coaching
A study of modern techniques and practices used in the organizational procedure of athletic programs. Covers major problem areas such as practice and game organization, purchase and care of equipment, budget and finances, public relations, legal liab,ility, drug abuse, and sports psychology. Analyzes modern trends and issues in athletics as well as various philosophical views of athletics as a part of the educational curriculum. Fall, annually.|
ATSW 409
Kines Found Coach
Helps coaches increase their understanding of basic scientific information concerning athletic movement by utilizing the conceptual approach. Examins three main areas of study: applied anatomy, the production of motion, and application. Applies scien,tific principles to athletic skills to aid in the coaching and teaching of skills. Spring, annually.|
ATSW 430
Sports Management
Provides students with an understanding of how the principles and concepts of management theory can be applied to sports administration. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Every other semester.|
ATSW 440
Sports Facility And Event
This course is designed to assist the sport management student in acquiring necessary knowledge and skill needed to manage a sport facility and to plan a variety of sport programs.|
ATSW 542
Intro to Corrective Exercise
This course entails the investigation of the rationale for corrective exercise training and understanding human movement science and human movement impairments for the practicing or prospective professional. It will also include the learning of heal,th risk appraisals, assessment strategies, and the corrective exercise continuum.|
ATSW 543
Corrective Exercise App
This course entails the investigation of specific corrective exercise strategies for the practicing or prospective professional. These include: inhibitory, activation, and integration skills as well as corrective exercise techniques for the foot and,ankle, knee, lumbo-pelvic-hip complex, shoulder, elbow, wrist, cervical spine and other limitations that result from disabling conditions. Prerequisite: ATSW 542 - Introduction to Corrective Exercise|
ATSW 556
Athl Injur: Prev, Recog & Eval
Presents the latest principles and techniques for preventing common athletic injuries. New theories on the care of injuries are discussed and implemented. Students will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to help provide a safe enviro,nment for athletes while they are participating in sports. Also, in an emergency, students will learn how to help sustain life and minimize the consequences of injury or sudden illness until medical help arrives. Students in this class will earn a Sp,ort Safety Training Certificate from the Red Cross. Summer course for Act 48 requirements.|
ATSW 557
Phys Fund Of Ath Coaching
Study of the scientific principles of physiology and how they can be applied to athletic conditioning. Both muscular and energy fitness development are covered in detail. Sport nutrition and a wide variety of training methods are covered. Summer cour,se for Act 48 requirements.|
ATSW 558
Prin & Prob Of Athl Coaching
Study of modern theory and practices of athletic coaching, including: philosophy, sport psychology, risk management, team management, self management, teaching sport skills, and problems and issues of concern in athletics. Summer course for Act 48,requirements.|
ATSW 559
Kinesiological Found Ath Coach
Helps coaches understand basic scientific information concerning athletic movement. Biomechanics emphasize the analysis of motion and application of force. Applies scientific principles to effective teaching of athletic skills. Summer course for Act, 48 requirements.|
BCHM 453
Biochemistry
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BCHM 454
Biochemistry II
This course is a continuation of CHEM 453. Topics will include carbohydrate, lipid and amino acid metabolism, bioenergetics, vitamins and minerals, control and regulation of metabolic pathways, and the nature of genetic diseases. Prerequisite: CHE,M 453. Spring annually.|
BCHM 463
Biochem Lab
Experiments involving the major techniques in modern biochemistry. Emphasizes separation and purification techniques, kinetic studies, quantitative determinations, and analytical instrumentation in biochemistry and biotechnology. Must be taken concur,rently with CHEM 453. Prerequisite: CHEM 251 or 254. Fall, annually.|
BIOL 105
Freshman Biology Seminar
Recommended for all freshmen and new majors in any area of Biology. Enables students to (1) explore and understand various majors, minors, curricula, and career options in Biology; (2) become familiar with Biology Department faculty, research interes,ts and opportunities; (3) identify and /or utilize department, campus and community resources that will enhance their academic program; and (4) develop and apply strategies to facilitate the learning process.|
BIOL 111
Basic Biology
Deals with the principles of biology. Includes cellular structure and physiology, growth and repair, reproduction and development, control, sources of food energy, inheritance, and people's interrelationship with their biological environment. Briefly, reviews the classification of plants and animals. Credit not to be applied toward biology major. Each semester.|
BIOL 115
Introductory Biology
A basic course in Biology for non-science majors. Includes cellular structure and function, molecular biology, genetics, survey of organisms, evolution, and ecology. Divided into two hours of lecture and a two-hour instruction/laboratory/discussion/r,ecitation session weekly. Credit not to be applied toward the Biology major. Each semester.|
BIOL 116
Aerodynamics: Ph/Bio Of Flight
The biomechanics of flight. Students will use techniques in physics and evolutionary biology to study how animals fly and swim. Drawing upon bats, birds, insects, and even winged seeds, we will discuss and test the basic operating principles of win,gs. We will apply results obtained with a wind tunnel to the locomotion of objects in water. Students will then be able to compare and contrast the flyers and swimmers of nature with those of human invention. The course will have a substantial stu,dio laboratory component. Offered every other fall.|
BIOL 125
Intro To Forensic Science
Basic course in forensic science for non-majors combining field techniques in forensic ecology and taphonomy with laboratory techniques in molecular biology and biotechnology. Summer: daily for 8 hours, for 5 days or during the fall semester: weekly, for 3 hours, for 12 weeks. Credit not to be applied toward any biology major. Summer or fall on demand. Prerequisite: a course in basic or introductory biology or permission of instructor.|
BIOL 150
Insects And Society
A basic course in insects and their interactions with human society. Includes insect diversity, insect structure and function, insect biology, and both insect benefits and damage. Three lecture hours weekly. Credit may not be applied toward a Biol,ogy degree. Annually.|
BIOL 153
Intro Animal Biology
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BIOL 154
Intro Plant Biology
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BIOL 155
Prin Of Biology I
Introduces fundamental concepts of biology focusing on the characteristics of living things, cell function, biological information, storage and retrieval, and organismal structure and function. Presents concepts in the context of current evolutionary, theory. Three hours lecture weekly. For biology majors. All science and science education majors and biology minors must concurrently register for BIOL 165|
BIOL 156
Prin Of Biology II
Introduces fundamental concepts of biology focusing on organismal structure and function, adaptation, behavior, and ecology in the context of current evolutionary theory. Three hours lecture weekly. For biology majors. All science and science educati,on majors and biology minors must concurrently register for BIOL 166. SPring, annually.|
BIOL 165
Prin Of Biology I Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 155. Three hours laboratory weekly. For biology majors. Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 155 unless it is being repeated. Fall, annually.|
BIOL 166
Prin Of Biology II Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 156. Three hours laboratory weekly. For biology majors. Must be taken concurrently with BIOL 156 unless it is being repeated. Spring, annually.|
BIOL 200
Selected Topics In Biol
Provides for focused study of a special interest topic in biology using different learning formats selected by the instructor as best suited for the particular course. May be offered in any semester, subject to demand and staff availability. Not for,biology majors.|
BIOL 201
Genetics
A study of the principles of inheritance in plants and animals, including humans. Topics include Mendelian genetics, linkage recombination, cytogenetics, and molecular genetics. Three lecture hours and one recitation hour weekly. Prerequisites: C,ompletion of BIOL 155, 156, 165, and 166, with a grade of a C or better and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Fall and Spring, annually.|
BIOL 202
Principles Of Ecology
Examines the interaction of organisms and their biotic and abiotic environment, population dynamics and interactions, community structure and function, and ecosystem energetics and biogeochemistry. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prere,quisites: Completion of BIOL 155, 156, 165 and 166 with a grade of C or better, or permission of instructor. Fall and Spring, annually.|
BIOL 203
Cell Biology
Examines structure, biochemistry, and function of plant and animal cells. Three lecture and two laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166, CHEM 151 or 153, 161 or 163, 152 or 154, 162 or 164, all with a C or better. Each seme,ster.|
BIOL 210
Sec Sci Ed Sophomore Seminar
Introduces biology, chemistry, earth science, general science, and physics education majors to the major requirements in their program. Cross disciplinary discussions guide students in the integration of pedagogical principles from their foundation,education courses with content from their specialty courses. Students are introduced to the PA Academic Standards as well as the National Science Education Standards. Artifacts created with guidance in this seminar become part of an electronic Lear,ning Portfolio. Required for all Secondary General Science majors. Annually.|
BIOL 211
Environ Science & Sustain
Humans are changing the global environment in profound ways but the consequences are not widely understood. This course will examine current environmental issues from a scientific perspective and explore how science can be best used to shape sound e,nvironmental law and regulation, public lands, types and sources of air and water pollution, and other environmental issues of current interest. Environmental issues of local and regional importance will be emphasized. Three lecture hours weekly.,Credit not to be applied toward a biology major.|
BIOL 224
Human Biology
This course focuses on the biology of the human organism. Recent scientific and medical advances as they relate to the development of public policy are interwoven through topics covered. The biology of our aging human population including issues su,ch as infection, autoimmunity, cancer, as well as respiratory, cardiovascular, and urinary system decline, will be discussed. Credit not to be applied toward a biology major or biology education certification. Annually.|
BIOL 225
Human Genetics
Mendelian genetics and the inheritance of human genetic disease. Examines the anatomical, physiological, biochemical, and genetic basis of human diseases, including diabetes, atherosclerosis, and cancer, and the genetic component of human illness. An,alyzes behavioral genetics, sociobiology, recombinant DNA, gene therapy, and medical ethics. Non-majors course for students who wish to know more about human genetics than is available in basic biology. Particularly useful for students in anthropolog,y, rehabilitative sciences, psychology, sociology, and special education. Prerequisite: One semester of biology or permission of instructor. Annually.|
BIOL 251
Human Anatomy & Physiology I
Analyzes the normal structure of the human body and how it functions. Focuses on skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocrine systems and their interrelationships. Three lecture hours weekly. Fall, annually. Not for biology majors.|
BIOL 252
Human Anatomy & Physiology II
Continuation of BIOL 251, Anatomy and Physiology I. Includes the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and urinary systems and their interrelationships. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: Biol 251. Spring, annually. Not for biology majors.|
BIOL 260
Microbiology
Examines microorganisms, including viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, emphasizing those associated with human health and disease. Considers immunity and resistance to infectious diseases and to their epidemiological and public health aspects. La,boratory emphasizes pathogenic bacteria and the bacteriological and microscopic techniques. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Not for biology majors. Pittsburgh Campus, annually.|
BIOL 261
Hum Anat & Phys I Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and integrate course material emphasized in BIOL 251 with emphasis on anatomy and select physiology activities. Focuses on skeletal, muscular, nervous, sensory, and endocine systems. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must b,e taken concurrently with BIOL 251 unless it is being repeated. Fall, annually. Not for biology majors.l|
BIOL 262
Human Anatomy & Phys II Lab
Laboratory exercises augment and intergrate course material emphasized in BIOL 252, and continuation of BIOL 261. Focuses on circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must be taken concurr,ently with BIOL 252 unless it is being repeated. Spring, annually. Nor for biology majors.|
BIOL 289
Career Dev Health Prof
Students in this course will research and discuss current issues in health care, including professionalism, policy, practice, and reform. The goals of this course are to familiarize future health care professionals with issues related to their career,, as well as with the applciation process and requirements for admissino to health professional programs (medical, dental, veterinary, etc.), guide students in preparing a portfolio of necessay application materials, and develop their writing, interv,iew, test-taking, and other necessary skills and experiences. It will also include a service-learning activity. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor's permission|
BIOL 301
Marine Invertebrates
This course introduces students to the taxonomy, structure, function and ecology of marine invertebrates emphasizing specializations which have allowe these animals to exploit a wide variety of marine habitats. Major trends in invertebrate evolution, will be used to illustrate the development of form and function in these animals. Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology. Completion of a crouse in general zoology is desirable. Summer, on demand.|
BIOL 305
General Zoology
Surveys the animal kingdom. Emphasizes the biology and classification of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals. Covers the role of animals in ecosystems and interrelationships among the various taxa and aspects of morphology, phylogeny, ethology,,and zoogeography. Includes special reference to animals occurring in Pennsylvania. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166. Alternate years.|
BIOL 306
General Botany
A survey of the structure, function and diversity of non-vascular and vascular plants from an evolutionary perspective. Topics will include structure, function, organization and evolution of plant cells and tissues, photosynthesis and nutrition, wat,er uptake and balance, hormonal control of growth, reproduction and dispersal, and classification and systematics. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 155, 156, 165, 166 or equivalent courses.|
BIOL 307
General Mycology
A survey of Kingdom Fungi, with particular emphasis on the mushrooms, molds, yeasts, smuts, rusts and slime molds. Topics include the morpholoogy, physiology, biochemistry, systematics, ecology and evolution of fungi. Laboratory stresses identificati,on of higher fungi, laboratory techniques and field mycology. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 155 and BIOL 156 or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years|
BIOL 310
Sec Sci Ed Junior Seminar
This seminar engages secondary science education majors in cross disciplinary content and pedagogical discussions. Students create lesson plans that engage secondary students in science investigations, using advanced technologies where appropriate., Artifacts created in this seminar become part of an electronic Learning Portfolio. Includes early field experience guided teaching experiences.|
BIOL 341
General Microbiology
A study of microorganisms, including bacteria, viruses, fungi. Extensive laboratory work includes isolation, staining, culturing, and identification of microorganisms. Examine prokaryotic cell architecturee, microbial physiology, methods or control,ling the growth of microbes, micorbial genetics, medical microbiology, and applied and environmental microbiology. Two lecture periods and two laboratory periods weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 155, 156, 164, 166, CHEM 151 or 153, 161 or 163, 152 or 15,4, 162 or 164, all with a C or better. Each semester.|
BIOL 360
Problems In Biology
Acquaints students with skills and techniques used in research. Students identify a problem for investigation and complete all phases of its study, including writing a research report. Approval from the staff member who will direct the student must b,e secured before pre-registration.|
BIOL 375
Herpetology
Students will study the ecology and evolution of amphibians and reptiles. Topics to be studied include behavior, morphology, physiology, taxonomic diversity, systematic practice, evolutionary biology, and conservation biology. Course includes a subst,antial field component. Taught summer session, Pymatuning Laboratory of Ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 202|
BIOL 382
Evolution
Analyzes evolution and its links with other areas of biology. Includes the history of evolutionary thought, species concepts and speciation processes, phylogenetic patterns and their reconstruction, diversity of life, and the mechanisms of evolution., Satisfies the second value flags of the university general education requirements. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology and one semester of genetics (BIOL 201 at Clarion) or permission of i,nstructor.|
BIOL 400
Special Topics
Advanced topics in various areas of biology. The professor selects a format most suitable to the study. May be offered on request of students, subject to staff availability. Enrollment by consent of the instructor. On demand.|
BIOL 402
Biometry
Intro to the collection, analysis, and presentation of biological data. Fundamental aspects of designing and executing descriptive and experimental studies emphasizing biological research. Stresses applications to undergraduate and graduate research,in progress in the Department of Biology. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 403
Coral Reef Ecology
A study of coral reef structure, formation, types, and the relationships of reef organsims to their environment. Emphasis is given to species diversity, identification, symbioses, and effects of temperature, salinity, light, nutrient concentration,,predation, and competition on the abundance and the distribution of coral reef organisms. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology. Completion of a course in general zoology in desirable. Summer, on demand.|
BIOL 404
Genomics And Bioinformatics
The new disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics analyze the deluge of DNA sequence data currently being generated. Topics include comparative structure of prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes, genetic variation in humans and pharmacogene,tics, and genomic circuits and complex diseases. Students will be introduced to the computational techniques and algorithms of Bioinformatics, and use them to mine information about a gene and genome of their choice. Designed for students in biolog,y, molecular biology, evolutionary biology, biochemistry, industrial mathematics and computational science. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and MATH 260 OR MATH 221, or permission of instructor. Fall alternate|
BIOL 405
Ecological Applications
Case history approach to the analysis and possible resolution of both terrestrial and aquatic environmental problems. Students analyze problems from a number of perspectives, including the biological, in an assessment of the problem. Incorporates sam,ple design, cost considerations, data collection, and analysis into the assessment. Overall assessment of problems and possible resolutions will be conveyed both orally and in a written format. Intended as a capstone for students in the Applied Ecolo,gy Program, but appropriate for other students who meet prerequisites. Satisfies the writing intensive and second values flags of the university general education requirements. Prerequisites: BIOL 202 or permission of the instructor, BIOL 493 and 494|
BIOL 410
Field Meth In Environ Biol
A field-based course designed to give students hands-on experience in the various methods needed in environmental studies. The course will focus on the environmental assessment of terrestrial and aquatic habitats and the impacts of perturbations on,flora, fauna, and natural landscapes. Summer, on demand.|
BIOL 411
Wildlife Ecology & Mgmt
An in-depth approach to the ecology and management of wildlife species - birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles - at scales ranging from populations to landscapes. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in wildlife ecology and manageme,nt such as the dynamics of exploited populations, non-game wildlife, population regulation by predators, parasites, and diseases, habitat evaluation and management, and restoration of wildlife populations. Laboratory will emphasize descriptive and i,nvestigative studies of wildlife in local ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 305 desirable.|
BIOL 425
Fisheries Biology
Examines ecology of fish populations, including taxonomy identification, age and growth, population estimation and analysis, food habits, management, and environmental requirements. Emphasizes data analysis and application of microcomputers in fisher,ies work. Two lecture and three hours of laboratory or field work weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in ecology or permission of instructor and PA fishing license required. Alternate years.|
BIOL 427
Field Botany
Field-based course emphasizing the identification and natural history of common vascular plants native to western Pennsylvania and methods used to study them. Course will be taught at a time when the spring flora is conspicuous. Spring, alternate y,ears.|
BIOL 428
Ornithology
Deals with the biology of birds. Lectures cover topics such as classification; internal and external adaptations for flight, migration, nesting, feeding habits, behavior, ecology, and physiology. Two lectures and three laboratory or field trip hours, per week. Prerequisite: Junior or higher standing in biology or permission from the instructor. Spring, even numbered years.|
BIOL 430
Biology Of Cancer
This course presents an in depth overview of both the scientific and clinical aspects of cancer with an emphasis on the cellular, molecular, and genetic models of cancer development in humans. Topics include: cancer epidemiology, biochemical process,es of malignant process, TNM classification, modern advances in tumor biology and molecular biology including the effects of a variety of agents (chemical, radiation, viruses, and oncogenes) that cause human cancer. Furthermore, the course examines,the major types of cancer as well as present methods of cancer prevention and treatment. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 432
Field Ornithology
Deals primarily with the identification and natural history of birds of western Pennsylvania. It is taught at a time when migratory species are commonly seen. Although lectures are an important component, indoor and outdoor laboratory activities pl,ay a predominant role. Prerequisite: BIOL 155/165 and BIOL 156/166 or permission of the instructor. Spring, even numbered years.|
BIOL 440
Environmental Microbiology
Explores the diversity, distribution, and activiites of microorganisms in natural, managed and extreme environments, with a particular focus on microbial communities, interactions and environmental processes. Laboratory sessions and field experience,s will be on an arranged basis. Prerequisite: BIOL 341 or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years|
BIOL 443
Virology
Study of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses, emphasizing biochemistry, structure, life cycles, and disease-causing mechanisms. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341: CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. F,all, even numbered years.|
BIOL 444
Immunology
Study of the mammalian immune system. The course will focus on the parts of the system and how they function together to produce the varied and complex regulated responses that provide innate and adaptive immunity. The course will also incorporate,case studies involving dysfunction and pathophysiology of the immune system. Since this course is required for medical technology majors, essential laboratory principles and skills involving microscopy (light and flouorescence), utraviolet and visibl,e spectroscopy, affinity chromatography, mammalian virus culture, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, electrophoresis and blotting are presented. Three lecture hours weekly and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM|
BIOL 446
Pathogenic Microbiol
Study of the infectious agents of mammals and the diseases that result from infection by these agents. The course will focus on bacterial agents, their diagnosis and treatment. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning, of diagnostic procedures and case studies involving examples of pathogenic organisms. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Fall annually.|
BIOL 450
Cell Physiology
Study of the regulatory processes that occur within the eukaryotic cell that gover homeostasis and allow for adaptive change. The course will focus on membrane biochemistry, transport, protein sorting, cell signaling, cytoskeletal nanomotors, and ce,ll specialization. The laboratory portion of the course incorporatesexperiential learning of basic procedures that allow experientalists to uncover the workings of the eukaryotic cell. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequ,isites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annually.|
BIOL 451
Animal Physiology
Study of the comparative physiology of animals, including water and ion regulations, circulation, respiration, nutrition, nervous activity, endicrine functions, and responses to temperautre, light, gasses, and pressure. Two lecture and three laborat,ory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203; CHEM 252, 261, 252, and 262, or permission of instructor.|
BIOL 452
Plant Physiology
Life processes and responses of plants to the environment. Includes water relations, transpiration, translocation, photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, plant hormones and morphogenesis, photoperiodism, temperature responses, environmental and str,ess physiology. Two lectures and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in genetics, cell biology, and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. On demand.|
BIOL 453
Patho I, Endogen Agents
Analyzes the mechanisms by which disease occurs in humans. Emphasizes responses to the disease process, and the effects of pathophysiologic mechanisms on the normality of cell, tissue, organ and system functions, and the response of the body to the d,isease process. Prerequisites: Prior courses in physiology desired. Two years of study in biology or permission of instructor. Venango Campus and Pittsburgh site, annually. Not for biology majors.|
BIOL 454
Patho II Exog Agents
Study of mechanisms by which disease occurs in humans. Emphasizes disease related to heredity, physical, chemical, and biological stresses. Prerequisite: Three semesters of biology required or permission of instructor. Venango Campus, annually. Not f,or biology majors.|
BIOL 455
Endocrinology
Surveys the chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations in animals. Three hours lecture weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in physiology and one semester of organic chemistry or permission of instructor. Annually.|
BIOL 456
Entomology
General study of insects, including structure, physiology, classification, economic importance, and ecology. Two lecture and three hours of laboratory or fieldwork weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology or permissio,n of instructor. Alternate years.|
BIOL 459
Physiological Ecology
Nearly every habitat on earth, from thermal hot springs to polar ice caps, is home to some form of life. Physiological Ecology explores the biotic and abiotic challenges to organisms imposed by their environments and adaptations which allow them to,survive in various habitats, both in terms of how organisms physiologically adapt to short-term fluctuations in their environment and how adaptations influence biogeographic distribution and evolutionary success of various species. Topics include ad,aptations related to temperature, water and salt balance, and gas exchange. Adaptations of organisms to extreme or unusual environments may be considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, 203, 451 or instructor's permission. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 460
Comp Vertebrate Anatomy
Traces the most important trends in the evolution of basic structures in vertebrate lines and conveys an appreciation of how the mammals came to possess the combination of characters that make this group unique. Three lectures and three laboratory,hours weekly. Prerequisites: Two semesters of Intro Biology, or permission of instructor. Frequency: Alternate years|
BIOL 464
Developmental Biology
The course focuses on the major processes in multi-cellular development and embryogenesis and their underlying biochemical mechanisms. Throughout the semester, students will study various processes, such as cell differentiation, intra- and inter-cel,lular induction, and organismal morphogenesis. The class will primarily focus on animal or vertebrate development, though invertebrate and plant model organisms will also be examined. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, BIOL 203, CHEM 251, CHEM 252, CHEM 261,, and CHEM 262, all with a C or better. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 470
Mammalogy
Interrelationships of mammals and the biotic and biotic environment. Includes discussions and investigations of mammalian distribution, diversity, taxonomy, ecology, and physiology. Includes both field and laboratory studies. Two lecture and three, laboratory hours weekly. On demand.|
BIOL 471
Plant Ecology
In-depth approach to the interaction of plants with the physical and biotic environments at population, community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion focus on current topics in plant ecology such as disturbance, succession, herbi,vory, dispersal, competition, and environmental stress. Laboratory includes field-based experimental and descriptive investigations of plant population and communities. Two hours lecture/discussion and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: A c,ourse in principles of ecology or permission of instructor. On demand (Pymatuning).|
BIOL 473
Freshwater Ecology
Field-oriented study of the physics, chemistry, and biology of standing and flowing inland waters. Prerequisite: Completion of two semesters of introductory biology or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
BIOL 474
Ecol Of Aquatic Insects
Examination of the ecological adaptations of aquatic insects with special emphasis on morphology, habitat, and trophic relationships.|
BIOL 475
Wetland Ecology
Wetlands are an important transitional habitat from terrestrial to aquatic systems. They provide services that are critical to the health and functioning of the ecosystem, but in many ways wetlands defy easy definition. This class will investigate th,e different types of wetlands, the properities that define wetlands, the benefits they supply to the ecosystem and society, and the history and present status of ecosystem management. Taught summer session Prerequisite: BIOL 202|
BIOL 477
Forest Ecology
An in-depth approach to the structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiple scales. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in forest ecology and management such as major forest types and climate, influence of physical,factors like soils and hydrology on forest ecosystem function, the importance of disturbance, herbivores and pathogens in structuring forest ecosytems, and the concept and practice of sustainability in forest management. Laboratory emphasizes descri,ptive and investigative studies of local forest ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 306 desirable. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 478
Biome Studies
A travel-study program which offers opportunities for study in the various biomes, e.g., grasslands, montane, seashore, etc. On demand.|
BIOL 483
Molecular Biology
Study of the structural and functional relationships of the major biological macromolecules, emphasizing nucleic acid biology. Laboratory emphasizes current systems, methods, and applications of biotechnology, including recombinant DNA techniques. Tw,o lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites:BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Annually.|
BIOL 485
Biotechnology
Advanced topics in the current systems, methods, and applications of nucleic acid and protein biotechnology. Two lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: Completion of a course in molecular biology or permission of instructor. Annually,.|
BIOL 491
Biogeography
The subject matter will cover aspects of the distribution of plants and animals. Main topics of concern will include interpretive approaches to biogeography, paleobiogeographic evidence of past distributions, the centers of origin of various groups,,mechanics and routes of dispersal and colonization, and the dynamics of extinction. Prerequisites: A course in genetics and principles of ecology or permission of instructor. On demand.|
BIOL 492
Animal Behavior
Study of the biological concepts of animal behavior. Investigates sensory receptors, internal mechanisms, genetics, learning and habituation, social organization, and communication. Lecture topics include techniques of observation and experiments in,animal behavior. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in principles of ecology and genetics or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
BIOL 493
Comm & Ecosys Dynamics
In-depth approach to the structure, function, and dynamics of ecological systems at community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion focus on current topics such as niche theory, the regulation of community structure, food webs, eco,logical stability, diversity, succession, and energy and material cycles. Laboratory emphasizes field-based descriptive and investigative studies of local communities and ecosystems. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisite,s: Completion of a course in principles of ecology, basic statistics highly desirable, or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 494
Population Biology
Investigates the empirical, experimental, and theoretical aspects of the structure, growth, and evolution of biological populations. Takes a holistic approach to how population genetics and population ecology interact to produce observed population s,tructure and dynamics. Two hours lecture/discussion and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in principles of ecology and applied calculus or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
BIOL 495
Undergraduate Sem I
Extensive exposure to primary scientific research articles in their field of studies allows the students to critically assess modern experimental techniques and theories. Furthermore the students will practice critical thinking and communication ski,lls required for professional scientists. Students will critique each seminar via written reviews as well as verbal discussions; focusing conclusion, and analysis of student presentations. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Required for Molecula,r Biology/Biotechnology majors. Fall, annually.|
BIOL 497
Evolutionary Ecology
Explores contemporary topics and landmark contributions in ecology and evolutionary biology through readings of research and review papers. Three hours lecture/discussion weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of a course in principles of ecology, evolut,ion, and genetics, or permission of instructor. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 499
Undergrad Res In Biology
Gives upper-level undergraduate students an experience in biological research. Students identify problems for investigation and complete all phases of study, including writing a research report. Prerequisites: Second semester junior or senior standin,g with a 3.0 QPA overall, a 3.0 QPA in biology or the consent of the department. Limited to a total of four credits during undergraduate career. Students seeking approval for a BIOL 499 project must complete the BIOL 499 registration form securing si,gnatures of the academic advisor and project director. BIOL 360 and 499 may not be used for the same project.|
BIOL 500
Graduate Seminar
A survey of current literature, concepts, and theories from selected fields of biology. Two discussion hours weekly. By arrangement.|
BIOL 502
Biometry
Collection, analysis, and presentation of biological data. Fundamental aspects of designing and executing descriptive and experimental studies with emphasis on biological research. Applications to undergraduate and graduate research in progress in th,e Department of Biology are stressed. Three lecture hours per week. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 503
Special Topics
Semi-independent studies of topical material under the guidance of the instructor. Maximum credit allowable toward graduation: nine semester hours. Prerequisites: permission of instructor and the student?s graduate committee.|
BIOL 504
Genomics And Bioinformatics
The new disciplines of genomics, proteomics and bioinformatics attempt to analyze the deluge of DNA sequence data currently being generated. Topics include comparative structure of prokayotic and eukaryotic genomes, genetic variation in humans and p,harmacogenetics, and genomic circuits and complex diseases. Students will be introduced to the computational techniques and algorithms of Bioinformatics, and use them to mine information about a gene and genome of their choice. Designed for student,s in biology, molecular biology, evolutionary biology, biochemistry, industrial mathematics and computational science. Two hours of lecture and three hours of lab. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and MATH 260 OR MATH 221 or permission of instructor. Fal|
BIOL 505
Ecological Applications
A case history approach to the analysis and possible resolution of both terrestrial and aquatic environmental problems. Students will analyze the problem from a number of perspectives, including the biological, in an assessment of the problem. Sample, design, cost considerations, data collection, and analysis will be incorporated into the assessment. The overall assessment of the problem and possible resolution will be conveyed both orally and in a written format. This course is considered a caps,tone for students in the Applied Ecology Program, but is appropriate for other students who meet the prerequisites. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, or permission of the instructor. BIOL 493 and 494 are recommended. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 508
Biology Internship
Internships provide practical experiences that are related to a student?s academic program or research area. Credits earned can be utilized as partial fulfillment of the Master of Science degree in biology. Students considering internship credits to,be applied toward the Master of Science degree must have the approval of their graduate advisory committee, the cooperating agency, and the appropriate university administrators. On demand.|
BIOL 511
Wildlife Ecology & Mgmt
An in-depth approach to the ecology and management of wildlife species - birds, mammals, amphibians and reptiles - at scales ranging from populations to landscapes. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics in wildlife ecology and manageme,nt such as the dynamics of exploited populations, non-game wildlife, population regulation by predators, parasites, and diseases, habitat evaluation and management, and restoration of wildlife populations. Laboratory will emphasize descriptive and i,nvestigative studies of wildlife in local ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 202 or equivalent. BIOL 305 desirable.|
BIOL 520
Terrestrial Botany
A field course emphasizing the identification, distribution, and ecology of upland vascular plants of Western Pennsylvania. Field and laboratory projects will focus on plant characteristics, taxonomic relations, floristics, habitat relationship, inve,ntory methods, and plant community description and dynamics. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 521
Aquatic Entomology
Emphasis in this course is on identification of the major groups of invertebrates playing a role in natural communities and on the methods of quantifying their relative importance in the community. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 522
Aquatic Botany
Study of freshwater algae and aquatic vascular plants in field communities, methods of quantifying relative numbers and mass, and structural and physiological adaptations to the aquatic environment. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 523
Exp Vertebrate Ecology
Designed to give knowledge of basic field identification, capture techniques, quantification, and natural history of some of the common vertebrates of Pennsylvania. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 524
Freshwater Ichthyology
A study of the physiological reaction involved in the growth, reproduction, and death of microbes. Consideration is placed upon the metabolism of carbohydrates, proteins, vitamins, and fats. Enzymes, oxidation-reduction potentials, energy relationshi,ps, membrane potentials, and nutrients are considered. Prerequisites: General Microbiology and Biochemistry or permission of instructor. Two lecture and four lab hours per week.|
BIOL 525
Fisheries Biology
Ecology of fish populations, including identification, age and growth, populations estimation and analysis, food habits, environmental requirements, and management considerations. Prerequisites: Environmental Biology or permission of instructor. Thre,e lecture hours per week. Laboratory sessions held on Saturdays. Student must possess a valid Pennsylvania fishing license.|
BIOL 526
Field Ichthyology
A field course dealing with the interrelationships of fish with their biotic and abiotic environment. Fish in their natural habitats, pollution, and improvements of aquatic habitats, and applied aspects of fish ecology and fishery management will be, studied. (Pymatuning). Student must possess a valid Pennsylvania fishing license.|
BIOL 527
Field Botany
A field-based course emphasizing the identification and natural history of common vascular plants native to western Pennsylvania and methods used to study them. Course will be taught at a time when the spring flora is conspicuous. Spring, alternate, years.|
BIOL 528
Ornithology
This course deals with the biology of birds. Lectures cover topics such as classification, internal and external adaptations for flight, migration, nesting and feeding habits, behavior, ecology, and physiology. There are two lectures and three labora,tory or field trip hours per week. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor. Spring, even-numbered years.|
BIOL 530
Biology of Cancer
This course presents an in depth overview of both the scientific and clinical aspects of cancer with an emphasis on the cellular, molecular, and genetic models of cancer development in humans. Topics include: cancer epidemiology, biochemical process,es of malignant process, TNM classification, modern advances in tumor biology and molecular biology including the effects of a variety of agents (chemical, radiation, viruses, and oncogenes) that cause human cancer. Furthermore, the course examines,the major types of cancer as well as present methods of cancer prevention and treatment. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisite: BIOL 201 and BIOL 203. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 532
Field Ornithology
This course deals primarily with the identification and natural history of birds of western Pennsylvania. It is taught at a time when migratory species are also commonly seen. Although lectures are an important component, indoor and outdoor laborator,y activities play a predominant role in this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 155/165; BIOL 156/166; or permission of the instructor. Spring, even-numbered years.|
BIOL 540
Environmental Microbiology
Explores the diversity, distribution, and activiites of microorganisms in natural, managed and extreme environments, with a particular focus on microbial communities, interactions and environmental processes. Laboratory sessions and field experience,s will be on an arranged basis. Prerequisite: BIOL 341 or permission of Instructor. Spring, alternate years|
BIOL 543
Virology
A study of plant, animal, and bacterial viruses, including the biochemistry of viruses and viral life cycles, techniques in the study of viruses in relation to diseases, tumors, and cancer. Prerequisites: Microbiology or Biochemistry or permission of, instructor. Three lecture hours per week.|
BIOL 544
Immunology
Study of the mammalian immune system. The course will focus on the parts of the system and how they function together to produce the varied and complex regulated responses that provide innate and adaptive immunity. The course will also incorporate,case studies involving dysfunction and pathophysiology of the immune system. Essential laboratory principles and skills involving microscopy (light and flourescence), ultraviolet and visible spectroscopy, affinity chromatography, mammalian virus cult,ure, enzume linked immunosorbent assay, electrophoresis and blotting are presented. Three lecture hours weekly and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annual|
BIOL 546
Pathogenic Micro
Study of the infectious agents of mammals and the diseases that result from infection by these agents. The course will focus on bacterial agents, their diagnosis and treatment. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning, of diagnosis procedures and case studies involving examples of pathogenic organisms. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Fall annually.|
BIOL 550
Cell Physiology
Study of the regulatory processes that occur within the eukaryotic cell that govern homeostasis and allow for adaptive change. The course will focus on membrance biochemistry , transport, protein sorting, cell signaling, cytoskeletal nanomotors, and, cell specialization. The laboratory portion of the course incorporates experiential learning of basic procedures that allow experimentalists to uncover the workings of the eukaryotic cell. Three lecture hours and three laboratory hours weekly. Pr,erequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Spring annually.|
BIOL 551
Adv Animal Physiology
A detailed review of the comparative physiology of animals, including water and ion regulations, circulation, respiration, nutrition, nervous activity, endocrine functions, and responses to temperature, light, gasses, and pressure. Includes literatu,re review and individual investigations. Two lecture and three hours laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cell Biology and Organic Chemistry, or permission of instructor.|
BIOL 552
Adv Plant Physiology
Life processes and responses of plants to the environment. Topics include water relations, transpiration, translocation, photosynthesis, respiration, metabolism, plant hormones and morphogenesis, photoperiodism, temperature responses, environmental a,nd stress physiology. Two lecture and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, and CHEM 254. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
BIOL 555
Endocrinology
A survey of the chemical and physiological principles of hormonal integrations in animals. Three lecture hours per week.|
BIOL 556
Entomology
A general study of insects, including structure, physiology, classification, economic importance, and relationships. Two lecture and three laboratory or field work hours weekly. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
BIOL 559
Physiological Ecology
Nearly every habitat on earth, from thermal hot springs to polar ice caps, is home to some form of life. Physiological Ecology explores the biotic and abiotic challenges to organisms imposed by their environments and adaptations which allow them to,survive in various habitats, both in terms of how organisms physiologically adapt to short-term fluctuations in their environment and how adaptations influence biogeographic distribution and evolutionary success of various species. Topics include ad,aptations related to temperature, water and salt balance, and gas exchange. Adaptations of organisms to extreme or unusual environments may be considered. Prerequisite: BIOL 202, 203, 451 or instructor's permission. Spring, alternate years.|
BIOL 563
Behavioral Ecology
An examination of the behavior of animals in relation to their natural environment with emphasis on the functioning of patterns of behavior in nature, intraspecific communication and social organization, behavioral relationships between species, and,the regulation of behavior by the environment. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 564
Developmental Biology
The course focuses on the major processes in multi-cellular development and embryogenesis and their underlying biochemical mechanisms. Throughout the semester, students will study various processes, such as cell differentiation, intra- and inter-cel,lular induction, and organismal morphogenesis. The class will primarily focus on animal or vertebrate decelopment, though invertebrate and plant model organisms will also be examined. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, BIOL 203, CHEM 251, CHEM 252, CHEM 261,, and CHEM 262, all with a C or better or permission of instructor. Fall, alternate years.|
BIOL 570
Id-Quant-Bac-Fung
|
BIOL 571
Habitat Ecology-Aquatic
A detailed examination is made of the structure and functioning of selected aquatic ecosystems. Emphasis is placed on the interrelationships of functioning systems. (3 credits at Pymatuning)|
BIOL 572
Terrest Comm Ecology
A study of the composition, distribution, and dynamics of plants and animals in selected terrestrial communities. Major biomes to be included will be grassland, deciduous forest, coniferous forest, and tundra. Summers only: six weeks. (3 credits at P,ymatuning)|
BIOL 573
Freshwater Ecology
A field-oriented study of the physics, chemistry, and biology of standing and flowing inland waters.|
BIOL 574
Ecol Of Aquatic Insects
Examination of the ecological adaptations of aquatic insects with special emphasis on morphology, habitat, and trophic relationships. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 575
Experimental Ecology
Study of designs suitable for investigation of natural populations and communities stressing statistical analysis, and the logical control of experiments in natural situations. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 576
Fungal Ecology
Emphasis will be on the role of fungi in the decomposition of organic materials in terrestrial and aquatic communities, and the recycling of mineral nutrients. (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 577
Forest Ecology
An in-depth approach to the structure, function and dynamics of forest ecosystems at multiples scales. Lecture and discussion focuses on current topics in forest ecology and management such as major forest types and climate, influence of physical fa,ctors like soils and hydrology on forest ecosystem function, the importnace of disturbance, herbivores, and pathogens in structuring forest ecosystems, and the concept and practice of sustainability in forest management. Laboratory emphasizes descri,ptive and investigative studies of local forest ecosystems. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly.|
BIOL 578
Biome Studies
A travel-study program which offers opportunities for study in the various biomes, e.g., grasslands, montane, seashore, etc. Summers only. Prerequisites: Environmental Biology or permission of instructor.|
BIOL 579
Alpine Ecology
Students travel to the Beartooth Mountains in northern Wyoming where they may undertake field studies of aquatic and terrestrial communities along an altitudinal transect. Permission to register granted on an individual basis. (Students will share co,st of travel and food. Tents and cooking facilities will be provided.) (Pymatuning)|
BIOL 582
Evolution
|
BIOL 583
Molecular Biology
Study of the structural and functional relationships of the major biological macromolecules, emphasizing nucleic acid biology. Laboratory emphasizes current systems, methods, and applications of biotechnology, including recombinant DNA techniques. T,wo lecture and four laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 201, 203, 341; CHEM 251, 261, 252, and 262, all with a C or better. Annually.|
BIOL 585
Biotechnology
Advanced topics in the current systems, methods, and applications of recombinant DNA and protein biotechnology. Three lecture/discussion and three lab hours each week. Prerequisite: BIOL 483/583 or consent of instructor. Spring, annually.|
BIOL 591
Biogeography
The subject matter covers aspects of the distribution of plants and animals. Main topics of concern include interpretive approaches to biogeography, paleobiogeographic evidence of past distributions, the centers of origin of various groups, mechanism,s and routes of dispersal and colonization, and the dynamics of extinction. Prerequisites: BIOL 202 and 203.|
BIOL 592
Animal Behavior
Study of the biological concepts of animal behavior. Investigates sensory receptors, internal mechanisms, genetics, learning and habituation, social organization, and communication. Lecture topics include techniques of observation and experiments in,animal behavior. Three lecture hours weekly. Prerequisites: Completion of courses in principles of ecology and genetics or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
BIOL 593
Comm & Ecosys Dynamics
An in-depth approach to the structure, function, and dynamics of ecological systems at community, ecosystem, and landscape scales. Lecture and discussion will focus on current topics such as niche theory, the regulation of community structure, food w,ebs, ecological stability, diversity, succession, and energy and material cycles. Laboratory will emphasize field-based descriptive and investigative studies of local communities and ecosystems. Three lecture and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites,: BIOL 202 or equivalent is required. A basic statistics course is highly desirable. Fall, even-numbered years.|
BIOL 594
Population Biology
This course deals with the empirical, experimental, and theoretical aspects of the structure, growth, and evolution of biological populations. The course will take a holistic approach to how population genetics and population ecology interact to prod,uce observed population structure and dynamics. Two hours lecture/discussion and three lab hours weekly. Prerequisites: BIOL 202, MATH 260, or permission of the instructor. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
BIOL 597
Evolutionary Ecology
This course explores contemporary topics as well as landmark contributions in ecology and evolutionary biology. These topics are explored by readings of research and review papers. Three hours lecture/discussion weekly. Prerequisites: completion of c,ourses in each of the following: principles of ecology, evolution, and genetics; or permission of instructor.|
BIOL 600
Special Prob In Biol
By permission.|
BIOL 700
Research & Thesis
Prerequisite: Successful oral defense of prospectus seminar|
BSAD 237
Global Studies Travel Seminar
This seminar course is designed to give students an opportunity to travel internationally for a two week period to at least three centers of business and industry. The tour includes lectures and company visits. The third week will be used to summariz,e the visits and complete term projects. Students will need to pay for the cost of travel in addition to tuition expenses.|
BSAD 238
Intro to Paralegal Studies
Designed to provide an introduction to the present and potential role of the legal assistant within our legal system. The student will be introduced to the operation of the court structure and the tasks handled by paralegals within this structure., Introduction to legal research and office computers as well as ethical obligations of the Legal Assistant will be emphasized. A prerequisite for all other Legal Business Studies courses.|
BSAD 239
Family Law
In-depth study of all of the area of family law encountered by a legal assistant. Includes divorce, custody, child and spousal support, adoptions, termination of parental rights, and abuse of family members. Students learn both substantive law and pr,ocedure. Includes the creation of legal pleadings in the family law area. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Biennially, Fall Semester at Venango.|
BSAD 240
Legal Environment I
Surveys law and society. Orients students to the judicial systems of the United States and the legal remedies and mechanisms at their disposal. Compares and contrasts both civil and equitable court functions through the illustrations of common law co,ntracts, torts, criminal law, property law, and the administration of decedents' estates. Each semester at Clarion Campus. Fall annually at Venango.|
BSAD 241
Legal Environ II
Applies concepts explored in BSAD 240, Legal Environment I, in a business context. Emphasizes general substantive business law topics; i.e.: agency, partnerships, corporations, sales, negotiable instruments, and real property. Prerequisite: BSAD 240., Each semester at Clarion Campus. Spring, annually at Venango.|
BSAD 242
Methods Of Legal Resrch
Students learn the traditional legal research materials and brief writing techniques, including use of digests and citators. Emphasizes legal research in the area of administrative law. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Spring, annually, Venango only.|
BSAD 243
Wills, Trusts & Estates
Provides instruction regarding the administration of the probate estate as well as necessary documentation and filing requirements. Students gain understanding of various laws governing transfer of property at death as well as tax consequences of suc,h a transfer. Students also study creation of trusts and transfers during life. Concepts are applied to the actual drafting of wills, trusts, codicils, and ancillary documents. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Biennially, Fall Semester at Venango.|
BSAD 244
Administrative Law
In-depth study of various administrative law topics. Familiarizes students with statutes and regulations supporting Social Security, unemployment compensation, and workmen's compensation. Involves study of judicial precedent and mock hearing practice,. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Biennially, Spring Semester at Venango.|
BSAD 246
Civil Litigation
In-depth study of various court procedures, including discovery, that the legal assistant will use in supporting an attorney during litigation. Familiarizes students with the rules of court, including both criminal and civil practice. Instructs legal, assistants on how to prepare various court documents. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Offered at Venango.|
BSAD 247
Real Estate Law For Para
Includes estates in land, property sales contracts, deed preparation, title abstracts, searching courthouse records, adverse possession, easements, judgments and liens, tax sales, and the Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act. Students learn to compl,ete all necessary documents involved in all real estate transactions and to prepare all histories of title so that the attorney may certify the title and complete closing. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Biannually, Spring Semester at Venango.|
BSAD 248
Legal Writing
Detailed study of the various writing tasks performed by a legal assistant. Students become proficient at writing pleadings, trial briefs, appellate briefs, legal memoranda, demand letters, and informational requests. Familiarizes students with vario,us briefing techniques and rules of style. Explores the required briefing forms of various courts and administrative appeal agencies. Prerequisites: BSAD 240 and 242. Fall, annually at Venango.|
BSAD 249
Field Experience
|
BSAD 250
Criminal Law And Procedure
An introduction to the procedures and practice of criminal law. This course will examine the development of law and an analysis of the criminal system bureaucracy, including punishment, courts and police. This course shall survey the system from th,e initial contact with the offender through prosecution, sentencing and release to the community.|
BSAD 340
Environmental Law
A study of environmental law and policy in the United States. Explores the method in which business entities and environmental organization--government and nongovernment--achieve compliance. Focuses on case law providing legal remedies for environmen,tal torts and crimes. Prerequisite: BSAD 240. Spring, annually.|
BSAD 341
Internat Environ Law
A study of international law and agreements affecting the global commons. Examines the process by which international accord is reached and enforced and the effects of GATT and NAFTA on environmental regulation. Analyzes the effects of transfrontier,pollution, resource allocation and industrialization. Provides case studies involving the redress of environmental wrongs. Prerequisite: BSAD 240 or permission of the instructor. Fall, annually.|
BSAD 437
Inter Business Seminar
Focuses on developing an understanding of the problems and opportunities faced by international organizations. In order to best achieve both micro and macro perspectives in the study of international aspects of the business, students visit businesses, abroad for discussions with top-level executives. In addition to international travel, the students will meet with the instructor for a series of briefing and debriefing sessions. An additional three credits may be taken (for a total of six) on an i,ndividualized basis. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Junior standing.|
BSAD 448
Adv Legal Writing And Research
Advanced legal research and writing procedures. Online research methodology shall be incorporated into the study of the various writing tasks performed by a legal assistant. The student will become proficient at writing pleadings, trial briefs, app,ellate briefs, legal memoranda, demand letters, and informational requests as well as the preparation of contracts for sale, deeds, leases and easements. Title abstracting, search for general liens tax liens, and property closing procedures will be,emphasized. The student will learn Motion Practice, Federal Practice and Discovery. Advanced legal research and writing techniques such as legislative history, argumentative briefs, depositions and interrogatories will be practiced.|
BSAD 490
Adm Decision Making
Requires students to synthesize what had been learned in the separate business fields and to utilize this knowledge in the analysis of complex problems. Emphasizes organizational and industry research and its application to strategic decision making,. Capstone course for a degree in business administration. Prerequisites: MGMT 320, MKTG 360, and FIN 370. Each semester.|
BSAD 491
Independent Study
Explores in depth a problem or area of business under the direction of a faculty member of the college. Prerequisites: 2.75 QPA and consent of both instructor and department head. Maximum credit granted in BSAD 491 is six credits.|
BSAD 494
Bus Executive Lecture
Introduces students to successful business practices. Several prominent business men and women from the local area give a series of lectures concerning their business philosophies and practices. Assists students in bringing together knowledge attaine,d from the business curriculum and suggesting practical applications of that knowledge. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
BSAD 503
Quant Anal For Bus Dec
Quantitative techniques and models which can be used for solving many of the problems that arise in business. Techniques include simple and multiple regression analysis, experimental design and analysis of variance, nonparametric tests, time series,analysis, decision theory. Opportunity is provided for students to become familiar with the use of several computer statistical software packages. Applications include domestic and international situations. Prerequisites: MBA Foundations courses in E,conomics and Business Statistics and Business Mathematics. Basic computer competency is required.|
BSAD 540
Legal Env & Eth Conduct In Bus
This course is design to provide the MBA student with an understanding of the concepts and issues related to the management of legal, ethical and social responsibilities of business organizations. Students learn the basic tools needed to manage a bus,iness in the legal environment in which it operates, to recognize and respond to ethical problems and social responsibilities of business, and to understand their personal responsibilities as business managers. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.|
BSAD 637
Multi Bus Sem
This course incorporates an established program involving a consortium of American universities called the International Business Seminar. The program involves a variety of trips to different nations for meetings with top-level executives of various,organizations. The program is supplemented with a series of meetings with the instructors both before and after returning from the trips. Individual assignments are made, and a text which includes topical materials is provided. The assignments are of, a graduate-level caliber, and are expected to produce presentable and/or publishable papers. Participation in seminars is expected to be at the graduate level. Should the student take this course for six credits, additional research will be required|
BSAD 661
Global Environ Of Business
This course is designed to provide the MBA student with an understanding of the concepts, tools, and issues related to the strategic management of a modern business organization in the global environment. Students will be exposed to characteristics,of the international business environment in relation to core theories of international business. The skills needed by managers to make informed ethical business decisions in a diverse and complex global environment will be stressed. Prerequisites:, MBA foundation course in Macroeconomics.|
BSAD 690
Strategic Mgmt & Bus Policy
Examines the set of managerial decisions and actions that determine the long-run performance of an organization. Emphasizes the integrative concerns of business policy, environmental and strategic analyses, and creating competitive advantage. Taken, last MBA semester and after all foundation courses.|
BSAD 699
Special Problems
A thorough study of a business topic selected by the student from his or her area of major interest. It may take the form of research, readings, practical on-site applications, or a combination of these. Findings must be presented in a written paper,which the student may be required to defend orally before a committee of graduate faculty and/or graduate students. Prerequisites: One or more graduate courses in the area from which the special project is selected, and consent of the student?s advis,or.|
CHEM 50
Prep For Chemistry
Emphasizes development of verbal, mathematical, and abstract reasoning skills, and a basic scientific vocabulary needed to more fully explore the science of chemistry. Designed for students who may not have sufficient background for college chemistry,. Placement is recommended by the Department of Chemistry or it may be taken by students who feel a need to strengthen their skills prior to entering the normal sequence of chemistry courses. Course credits do not count toward graduation or general e,ducation science requirement. Offered occasionally.|
CHEM 141
Freshman Seminar
Required of all freshman chemistry majors, this course provides an orientation to the university, to the faculty, and to the programs within the chemistry department including, among other topics, advisement, opportunities, curriculum and scheduling,, faculty expectations, laboratory safety procedures, facilities, career options, professional societies. The academic component, involving common readings, assignments, discussions, and attendance at seminars, is part of the course requirements.|
CHEM 145
Chem for Allied Health Sci I
This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence covering the main topics in general, organic, and biological chemistry as they relate to the health sciences field. Topics include atoms and molecules, chemical reactions, bonding, energy,in chemical reactions, phases of matter, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases, nuclear chemistry, and an introduction to hydrocarbons and organic chemistry.|
CHEM 146
Chem For Allied Sciences II
This course is the continuation of CHEM 145. CHEM 146 covers the principles of organic chemistry by functional groups plus the biochemistry of proteins, enzymes, carbohydrates, lipids, neurotransmitters and hormones. All topics are taught with an e,mphasis on health-related topics. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 151
Chem Principles I
Explores atomic theory, gases, solids, liquids, chemical bonding, and molecular structure. Intended for chemistry majors, pre-medical students, and others who desire a rigorous introductory course. CHEM 151 and 152 comprise the foundation for all sub,sequent courses in the major sequence. A strong background is desirable but not required. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 161. Three hours lecture. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 152
Chem Principles II
Includes second law, equilibrium, acids and bases, electrochemistry, kinetics, and coordination chemistry. Prerequisite: CHEM 151. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 162. Three hours lecture. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 153
General Chemistry I
Initial course in the fundamental concepts of chemistry for students not majoring in chemistry; it can serve as a preparation for CHEM 254 or as a general education elective. Includes atomic theory and structure, stoichiometry, chemical bonding, and,the physical states of matter. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 163. Three hours lecture. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 154
General Chemistry II
Continuation of CHEM 153. Includes a discussion of solutions, thermodynamics, equilibria, kinetics, acids and bases, and oxidation-reduction.. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 164. Prerequisite: CHEM 153. Three hours lecture. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 161
Chem Prin I Lab
Laboratory exercises to exemplify and augment the material in CHEM 151. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 151 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 162
Chem Principles II Lab
Laboratory exercises to exemplify and augment the material in CHEM 152. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 152 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 163
General Chem I Lab
Laboratory exercises to exemplify and augment the material in CHEM 153. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 153 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 164
General Chem II Lab
Laboratory exercises to exemplify and augment the material in CHEM 154. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 154 unless it is being repeated. Prerequisites: CHEM 153, 163. Three hours laboratory. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 205
Nutrition
Introduces the basic principles of human nutrition. Explores the structure of proteins, fats, carbohydrates, vitamins, and minerals and their role in metabolism. Analyzes nutritional needs of various age groups, nutrition and disease, and recent rese,arch in nutritional problems. Prerequisite: One semester of general chemistry or consent of instructor.|
CHEM 211
Science And Society
Describes the process of science as an ongoing and continuously developing means of describing the natural world. Examines what science is and how it is done. Promotes science literacy. Emphasizes written and oral communication skills as well as the,ability to understand important topics in science, along with the policy and ethical questions raised. Open to students in all academic areas.|
CHEM 251
Organic Chem I
Examines bonding, structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, and the mechanisms of free radical substitution, nucleophilic substitution, electrophilic addition and electrophilic aromatic substitution. Emphasizes organic syntheses, reactions, and metho,ds. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 261. Prerequisites: CHEM 151, 152 or 153, 154. Three hours lecture. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 252
Organic Chem II
Continuation of CHEM 251. A discussion of functional groups, their preparation and reactions. Emphasizes synthesis and mechanisms. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 262. Prerequisite: CHEM 251. Three hours lecture. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 254
Intro Organic Chem
Surveys the field of elementary organic chemistry, emphasizing nomenclature, simple reactions and mechanisms, and the structure of organic compounds, together with their relation to biology. Does not count toward the requirements for a major in chemi,stry and must be taken concurrently with CHEM 264 unless it is being repeated. Prerequisite: CHEM 152 or 154. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 257
Organic Spectroscopy
Applies modern spectroscopic techniques to the determination of the structures of organic compounds. Discusses the techniques of infrared, nuclear magnetic resonance, and mass spectroscopy, emphasizing their application toward the elucidation of stru,ctures of organic compounds. Presents necessary theoretical background and applications. Required of all chemistry majors. Prerequisites CHEM 252 or consent of instructor.|
CHEM 261
Organic Chem I Lab
Consists of experiments using important techniques, natural product isolation, and synthesis using modern instrumental methods. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 251 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 262
Organic Chem II Lab
Complex synthesis and organic qualitative analysis using modern instrumentation. Emphasizes the important spectroscopic methods of infrared and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Must be taken with CHEM 252 unless it is be,ing repeated. Prerequisite: CHEM 261. Three hours laboratory. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 264
Intro Org Chem Lab
Introduces important techniques, synthesis, and functional group analyses of organic compounds. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 254 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 270
Chem Information
Covers sources, organization, and the effective use of chemical information. Includes working safely with chemicals, regulatory agencies and their role in ensuring safety and environmental quality, and critical evaluation of scientific literature.,Discusses aspects of both printed and computer-based chemical information sources. Problem assignments provide illustration and practice in effective searching of the chemical literature. Co-requisites: CHEM 251, 261. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 271
Intro Inorganic Chem
Introduces coordination and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Laboratory focuses on the properties and reaction chemistry of the elements and inorganic compounds. Prerequisite: CHEM 152/162. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 311
Drugs: From Discovery To Mkt
A study of the drug development and the pharmaceutical industry. The course will, follow the path that new drugs take from their discovery in the laboratory, through in vitro testing, clinical trails, to final Food and Drug Administration (FDA) appro,val and post-market survellance. Attention will be paid to the role of the FDA, and ethical issues at every step along the path to market. Students will also examine drugs as molecules and how they function physiologically, as well as a look at the, major in vivo targets of drugs. Prerequisite: PHSC 111 or BIOL 111 or equivalent. Spring annually|
CHEM 351
Intro Analy Chem
Explores the theory and applied techniques and instrumentation of analytical chemistry for majors in the allied health and other biological professions. Includes separation procedures and spectrophotometric, volumetric, and electroanalytical methods., Geared toward the analytical chemistry needs of the allied health and biological professions. Does not count toward the requirements for a major in chemistry. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 361. Prerequisite: CHEM 152 or 154. Three hours l,ecture. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 353
Analy Chem I
Serves students both in chemistry and in related fields. Includes spectrophotometric and volumetric methods of chemical analysis. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 363. Prerequisite: CHEM 152 or 154. Three hours lecture. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 354
Physical Chem I
Concerned primarily with the principles of thermodynamics. Discusses kinetics in the latter portion of the term. Applies the laws of thermodynamics to many problem-solving situations. Uses calculus heavily, and requires a basic familiarity with the h,andling of simple differentials and integrals. Kinetics is treated from experimental and mechanistic points of view. Prerequisites: CHEM 152, 162; PH 252 or 259; MATH 271. Three hours lecture. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 355
Physical Chem II
Develops both the classical wave formulation and the concept of operators as approaches to the study of quantum mechanics. Students solve simple one-electron problems. Extends groundwork to molecular problems. Examines spectroscopy in detail, particu,larly as a tool in the determination of molecular structures. Discusses powder and single-crystal X-ray diffraction techniques and investigates their use as research tools. Prerequisite: CHEM 354. Three hour lecture. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 358
Analy Chem II
Includes separation procedures and electroanalytical and automated methods of chemical analysis. Students must concurrently schedule CHEM 368. Prerequisites: CHEM 354, 355; CHEM 355 concurrently, or consent of department. Three hours lecture. Spring,, annually.|
CHEM 359
Adv Organic Chem
A study of reaction mechanism, synthetic methods, and structure elucidations. Emphasizes sterochemistry and the correlation of structure and reactivity. Prerequisites: CHEM 252 and 354 (may be taken concurrently). Spring or Fall, alternate years.|
CHEM 361
Intro Analy Chem Lab
Laboratory exercises exemplify and augment topics included in CHEM 351. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 351 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 363
Analy Chem I Lab
Laboratory exercises exemplify and augment topics included in CHEM 353. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 353 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 364
Phys Chem I Lab
Involves experiments in the areas of thermodynamics and kinetics to reinforce what is taught in the lecture course. To be taken concurrently with CHEM 354. Experiments include bomb calorimetry, construction of a simple two-component phase diagram, an,d stopped-flow, fast-action kinetics. Prerequisite: CHEM 355. Three hours laboratory. Fall, annually.|
CHEM 365
Phys Chem II Lab
Taken concurrently with CHEM 355. Involves experiments in the areas of quantum mechanics, molecular spectroscopy, and crystallography. Experiments include obtaining rotational-vibrational spectra of a diatomic molecule utilizing Fourier Transform Inf,rared Spectroscopy (FTIR), and analyzing a powdered crystalline sample using X-ray diffraction. Prerequisite: CHEM 355 and 364. Three hours laboratory. Spring, annually.|
CHEM 368
Analy Chem Lab II
Laboratory exercises exemplify and augment topics included in CHEM 358 and the analytical techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy. Must be taken concurrently with CHEM 358 unless it is being repeated. Three hours laboratory. Sp,ring, annually.|
CHEM 400
Special Topics
|
CHEM 455
Adv Physical Chem
Concerned primarily with statistical mechanics and additional aspects of quantum mechanics such as molecular modeling and potential energy surfaces. Prerequisite: CHEM 355. Offered occasionally.|
CHEM 456
Adv Inorganic Chem
Extends and compares various concepts of bonding and molecular structure, encountered in previous courses, to gain appreciation of their uses and shortcomings. Includes acid-base theory, nonaqueous solvents, and coordination chemistry. The descriptiv,e chemistry includes recently discovered compound types as well as classical periodicity and periodic anomalies. Prerequisite: CHEM 354 or consent of the department. Three hours lecture. Fall, alternate years.|
CHEM 459
Demos In Chemistry
Studies are made of various demonstration techniques with students devising and applying each with many examples. Emphasizes the study of material the Chem. Study Committee of the American Chemical Society prepared for the purpose of vitalizing high,school chemistry courses. Prerequisites: CHEM 151, 152, and at least one other major course. Offered occasionally.|
CHEM 461
Adv Inorg/Org Lab
Involves complex synthesis of inorganic and organic compounds. Uses sophisticated techniques and contemporary instrumentation in the synthesis, analysis, and characterization of these inorganic and organic compounds. Spring, alternate years.|
CHEM 465
Chemical Research
An independent laboratory problem in some field of chemistry of special interest to the student. Admission only by consent of the instructor and the approval of the department chair. Prerequisites: CHEM 355, 358. Each semester.|
CHEM 466
Chemical Research
An independent laboratory problem in some field of chemistry of special interest to the student. Admission only by consent of the instructor and the approval of the department chair. Prerequisites: CHEM 355, 358. Each semester.|
CHEM 470
Chemistry Seminar
Search of the chemical literature on a topic of current interest, compilation of a bibliography, preparation of an abstract, and presentation of a seminar. Prerequisites: CHEM 252, 355. Spring annually.|
CHEM 471
Advanced Topics In Chem
Presents topics of current interest. Topics vary from year to year. Discusses topics such as non-aqueous solvents, solid state chemistry, polymers, chemical physics, group theory, stereochemistry, organometallics, and recent developments in spectrosc,opy. Prerequisite: CHEM 355 (may be taken concurrently). Offered occasionally.|
CHEM 485
Prob Chem Ed
In-depth exploration of a problem area in chemistry education according to the student's need or interest under the direction of a faculty member. Admission only by consent of instructor and approval of department chair. Prerequisite: Junior standing, or consent of the department. Not open to chemistry majors in the liberal arts or Bachelor of Science curriculum.|
CHIN 103
Intro to Chin Lang & Culture I
Introduces basic facts about Chinese languages and cultures. Topics include Chinese customs, current affairs, and contributions to literature, art, science, and technology of the world. Course taught in English.|
CHIN 151
Elementary Chinese I
Introduces the Chinese language, emphasizing all language skills - listening, speaking, reading and writing.|
CHIN 152
Elementary Chinese II
Continuation of CHIN 151: Elementary Chinese I. Prerequisite: CHIN 151 or placement based on evaluation.|
CIS 110
Computer Info Process
Surveys the need for, and roles of, computer information systems in contemporary society. Designed to satisfy the need of students from every discipline to be computer literate, and provides the necessary basis for further computer-related studies., Emphasizes computer requirements in organizations, history, hardware concepts, programming, application software, systems development, and computer operations.|
CIS 140
Ess Topics Discr Math Comp Sc
An introduction to the discrete mathematics essential for course work in computer science. Elementary coverage of proofs including mathematical induction, sets, functions, relations, boolean algebra, number theory, combinatorics, analysis of algorit,hms including recursive algorithms, matrices and the logic of control and data storage through hand computation. This course should be taken in a computer science major's first year. It is a prerequisite for upper division required major courses in, the Computer Science major. A successful student should be able to apply the concepts taught to problem solving in computer science.|
CIS 202
Intro Prog And Algo
Introduces algorithms and translation of algorithms into a programming language. Student will create algorithms and computer programs that implement those algorithms. Will learn programming language syntax and programming fundamentals including var,iables, input and output, arithmetic and logical operations, control flow (sequence, selection, iteration), file access and modular development. Computer language used may change over time, but an example language would be C# (C Sharp).|
CIS 206
Intro To Java Programming
Introduces the Java programming language. Designed to expose Information Systems majors to a second programming language (after C#). Involves programming Java applets and Java applications. Students learn the core of the language including its dat,a types, arithmetic statements, selection statements, repetition statements, arrays, and string processing features. Object oriented programming concepts are introduced but are not the focus of the course. Other topics include Java's windowing tool,kits, file input and output, exception handling, and the Java security model. Prerequisite: CIS 202 with a grade of C or better. Not for credit for CS majors.|
CIS 217
Appl Of Micro
Introduces the basic concepts of microcomputers and software applications. Includes commonly available software packages and graphics. No prerequisite.|
CIS 230
Practicum In CIS
Provides undergraduates with an introduction to the role of computer specialists in the everyday operation of a computer laboratory. Supplies real experience in such routine exercises as interacting with computer users to field problems and complaint,s, machine event logging, and performing simple tasks to keep machines operating. A maximum of six credits of the practicum may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: CIS 217 or permission of the instructor.|
CIS 244
Intro Prog & Algo II
Examines complex problem-solving techniques, top down design, and prgram debugginh and testing. Prerequisite: B or better in CIS 202 or permission of instructor.|
CIS 253
Comp Org/Asb Lang
Consists of two major parts: (1) an introduction to assembly language programming and (2) an introduction to computer organization and the structuring of major hardware components. Students develop a basic understanding of the mechanics of informatio,n transfer and control and the fundamentals of logic design. Prerequisite: CIS 202.|
CIS 254
Data Structures
Introduces the structuring of data in computer programs. Topics include static, dynamic, and persistent memory, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and hash tables. The major concepts are reinforced through programming assignments using algorithms i,llustrating the power of each data structure. Prerequisite: CIS 244.|
CIS 270
Client-Side Web Programming
Student will explore front-end, client-side web development emphasizing programming in a client-side programming language such as JavaScript or VBScript. Human-computer interface issues will also be explored as well as basic web page markup (HTML, X,HTML) and display (CSS). Student will also look at HTML validation issues and implications of different browser usage on web page rendering. Prerequisite: CIS 202 with a grade of C or better.|
CIS 301
Comp Sys Analysis
Study of informational needs and patterns of information flow within a large organization. Emphasizes the analysis and design of computer software systems. Examines ethical and legal issues related to information systems. Prerequisite: CIS 244 alon,e or both 217 and 202 (with a grade of C or better).|
CIS 303
Local Area Networks
Study of the technology of local area networks. Includes LAN design, topology, hardware, standards, protocols, and network operating systems. Includes significant hands-on experience building a LAN; and installing network interface cards and cable. P,rerequisites: CIS 202 with a grade of C or better.|
CIS 305
Art Intell Decision Make
Surveys the thinking and some of the pioneering efforts in the area of artificial intelligence (AI), integrated with more traditional approaches to decision-making. Applies AI principles through the use of logic programming languages. Prerequisite: C,IS 202 with a grade of C or better.|
CIS 306
Object Oriented Programming
Introduces a popular object-oriented programming language. Emphasizes object-oriented features of the language: classes and objects, encapsulation, inheritance, and virtual functions. Exposes students to both the syntax and semantics of the language., Applying these features, students complete several small programming projects. Smalltalk and Java are examples of a language that might be chosen. Prerequisite CIS 206 or CIS 244.|
CIS 312
Special Topics In Computing
Provides for focused study of a special interest topic in computing using learning formats selected by the instructor as best suited for the particular course. Prerequisites for particular course set by the instructor.|
CIS 317
Microcomp Maint Conc & Tech
Covers the installation, configuration, upgrading, troubleshooting and repair of microcomputer hardware. Includes basic networking concepts and printers. Knowledge of safety and common preventive maintenance procedures is stressed. Prerequisite:, CIS 217|
CIS 330
Info Systems Programming
In-depth study of event-driven programming with a concentration on the retrieval, updating and reporting of information stored in a database. Prerequisite: C or better in CIS 202 or permission of instructor.|
CIS 333
Info Sys Auditing & Security
Analyzes the information system audit process, provision and evaluation of controls in all aspects of information system operation, and the provision and maintenance of computer security. Stresses internal controls while examining specific controls a,nd security. Prerequisites: CIS 303.|
CIS 340
Discrete Math Structures
Introduces sets, relations, functions, combinations, graphs, and trees, emphasizing concrete models. Includes computer algorithms and mathematical structures useful in computer science. Designed for students in both mathematics and computer science.,Prerequisites: MATH 300 and CPSC 201.|
CIS 355
Operating Systems I
Covers the functions of operating systems, the design of operating systems at the register transfer and programming levels, and the important relationships between operating systems and computer hardware. Prerequisites: CIS 253 and 254.|
CIS 356
Analysis Of Algorithms
Analysis of algorithms represented in computer programs. Topics include correctness and performance of code used in searching, sorting, and solving mathematical problems. Prerequisites: CIS 254 and MATH 260 or 270.|
CIS 370
Server-Side Web Programming
Covers web programming focusing on the web server side of the client/server architecture. Students will learn the fundamentals of secure, dynamic, web application development using one or two of the most popular tool sets. Topics covered include we,b server setup, database setup, user authentication, session management, client/server interaction, and using the tool set to develop database driven web sites. One example of a tool set would be PHP as the programming language, MySQL as the databas,e, and Apache as the web server. Prerequisite: CIS 270: Client-Side Web Programming|
CIS 375
Software Engineering
Introduces the student to the basic concepts and ideas surrounding the discipline of software engineering. The student will analyze and design and implement one or more software projects. The language used will vary. Prerequisites: CIS 254 and 306.|
CIS 377
Computer Graphics
Provides an overview and application of the principles and tools of computer graphics. Includes characteristics of graphical display devices, graphics software primitives, representation, manipulation, and display of two- and three-dimensional object,s, interactive graphics and the graphical user interface, and animation. Includes graphics programming projects. Prerequisites: CIS 254.|
CIS 402
Data Base Sys Mgt
A study of data base management systems with hands-on experience. Students investigate the analysis, design, implementation, and maintenance of a modern data base management system. Prerequisite: CIS 301.|
CIS 403
Data Communications
Focuses on the OSI model of data communications and uses the model as the basis for discussions of protocols, topologies, transmission media, and communications security. The TCP/IP protocol suite is examined in detail. Prerequisite: CIS 303.|
CIS 411
Systems Devlmt Project
Students develop a computer-based solution to a real problem obtained from the university or the community. Working as a member of a group/team, students evaluate an existing system; identify alternative solutions; select a solution; develop a projec,t plan; and design, implement, test, and document the system. Utilizes current technology whenever possible, including microcomputers, and a relational database. Prerequisites: CIS 217, 301, and 402.|
CIS 412
Parallel Processing
Studies the architecture, algorithms, and programming that are involved with parallel processing. Students will learn how parallel architecture affects the design of parallel algorithms and parallel programming. Architectures shall include the prev,ailing message passing and shared memory architectures. Students will learn how to design parallel algorithms and how to think in parallel. Students will learn how to write parallel programs, using a prevailing parallel programming language. Progr,amming may be done by remotely using an account at a supercomputer center, using serial computers that are working together to solve a problem (a cluster), or using an individual computer which has multiple processors within it. Prerequisites: CIS|
CIS 422
Internship In Computers
Provides students the opportunity for practical computer experience in commercial, industrial, governmental, or other participating organizations. Prerequisite: CIS 253 or 330. Junior or senior standing.|
CIS 460
Programming Lang & Comp Theory
Introduces automata theory and Turing machines as well as the associated formal languages. Students will explore the construction and implementation of programming languages allowing the student to chooseand use programming languages in a competent,manner. Students will also explore different programming paradigms, such as robotics programming and parallel programming. Prerequisites: CIS/MATH 140 and CIS 254.|
CIS 462
Simulation/Modeling
Covers the advantages and disadvantages of using computer simulation in modeling. Students learn and practice techniques of computer simulation. Prerequisites: CIS 244 or 330.|
CIS 470
Project Management
Introduces students to basic project management concepts and reinforces those concepts through the use of project management software. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize and control information technology pro,jects. Key topics include monitoring and controlling schedules, progress reporting, risk management, quality management, cost management as well as contracting and procurement. Graduate students will analyze a case study; present it to the class; a,nd provide a 10-15 page written report on the case study analysis to the instructor. Prerequisites: CIS 301 and MGMT 320 or permission of instructor.|
CIS 499
Independent Study
Permits students to explore an area of special interest using computers. Department faculty member must direct the special project. Prerequisites: CIS 244 or 330, junior or senior standing.|
CIS 570
Project Management
Introduces students to basic project management concepts and reinforces those concepts through the use of project management software. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize and control projects. Key topics incl,ude monitoring and controlling schedules, progress reporting, risk management, quality management, cost management as well as contracting and procurement. Graduate students will analyze a case study; present it to the class; and provide a 10-15 page, written report on the case study analysis to the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or MGMT 500.|
CIS 649
Ed Tech Leadership
Involves a survey or various theories, models, and styles of leadership, followed by the application of leadership skills in teacher-pupil, teacher-colleague, teacher-administrator relationships and how those relationships are affected by the use of,technology in schools and how technology, in turn, impacts these roles. Summer, annually.|
CIS 650
Adv Technology Applications
This course develops advanced skills to support instructional technology programs. Coursework will cover areas such as advanced microcomputer applications, internet concepts as they apply to instructional technology, and PC operating system issues re,lated to instructional technology. The focus will be on computers and related technologies used in educational and training environments. Prerequisite: COMM 545, or permission of instructor. Summers/spring annually.|
CIS 651
Deploying Info Tech Infras
Focuses on the strategies involved in the provisioning and maintenance of information technology infrastructure. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize, implement and control information technology resources. Key, topics include identifying information infrastructure; defining the range of information technology leadership roles; and illustrating current best practices for managing information technology assets. Offered annually.|
CMST 101
Debate
Students earn one to three credits through participation on the Debate Team by successfully completing the terms of the Contract for Credit in SCT Activities, subject to approval by instructor and department chair. No more than three credits may be t,aken in SC 101 during any one semester. Students should not enroll in SC 101 and 256 for credit concurrently. Each semester.|
CMST 102
Public Speaking Events
Students earn one to three credit hours through participation on the Individual Events Team by successfully completing terms of the Contract for Credit in SC Activities, subject to approval by instructor and department chair. No more than three cred,its may be earned in SC 102 during any one semester. Students may not enroll concurrently in SC 102 and SC/THE 155, SC 213, or SC/THE 254 without instructor permission. Each semester.|
CMST 104
Comm Studies Ldrshp Act
Student earn one to three credits through participation in active leadership responsibilities with a university-relation organization. Students must successfully complete the terms of the Contract for Credit in SC Activities, subject to approval by,the instructor and the department chair. Students can earn a maximum of one credit per semester in SC 104 and no more than three credits total towards graduation. Successful completion of SC 104 will also require students to attend seminars through,out the semester. These seminars will be presented by Speech Communication faculty and will be lecture/discussion presentations pertinent to speech communication and leadership themes.|
CMST 110
Intro To Human Comm
A theoretical overview of the concepts involved in the human communication process.|
CMST 113
Public Speaking
Introduces the long tradition of public speaking, examines the role of public speaking in a multicultural world, applies the principles of research, organization and delivery to preparation and presentation of speeches, presents techniques students c,an use to combat stage fright, teaches applciationsof listening and critical thinking skills, and provides coaching for delivering a minimum of three in-class speeches designed for a variety of contexts. Each semester.|
CMST 120
Humanities I
Interdisciplinary humanities course focuses on western values, beliefs, and accomplishments as reflected in the arts, and historical development from the classical period to the close of the Middle Ages. No prerequisite. On demand.|
CMST 121
Humanities II
Continues study of Western culture from the Renaissance to the present. No prerequisite. On demand.|
CMST 160
Intro To Global Understanding
Introduces students to global perspectives that shape how we facilitate and coordinate interactions with people from different backgrounds through the use of verbal and nonverbal codes.|
CMST 200
Interpersonal Comm
Focuses on the study of interpersonal communication, specifically the investigation of major theories and research in the field and the application of those theories to improving the students' interpersonal skills.|
CMST 210
Intro To Rhetorical Theory
Investigates, on a fundamental level, the historical and conceptual development of the major theories of rhetorical discourse. Applies theories from classical to contemporary to analysis of the spoken word. Stresses speech making and criticism of his,torical and current political rhetoric.|
CMST 213
Persuasive Speaking
Involves the study and practice of persuasive speaking. Includes detailed analysis of the areas of invention, arrangement, style, delivery, and sophisticated use of speech criticisms a tool to improve the speaker's ability as a change agent in the p,ublic forum. Prerequisite: CMST 113.|
CMST 214
Bus & Prof Speaking
Develops professional presentation skills. Students learn how to effectively adapt presentations to business audiences and professional contexts as well as manage the constraints associated with technical material and sales objectives. Prerequisite,s: CMST 113.|
CMST 215
Argumentation & Debate
Study of argumentation in the area of academic debate and the legal world. Emphasizes applying theories and techniques of argumentation to developing analytical abilities, reasoning, use of data, and evidence to support arguments.|
CMST 216
Group Discussion
Trains students how to facilitate group discussions. Students will learn how to move groups through phases of development, effectively assume group task and social roles, and effectively conduct group meetings.|
CMST 217
Listening
Explores the process and integral role of listening in human communication from both a theoretical and practical perspective. Identifies different listening skills appropriate for diverse types and purposes of listening. Examines ineffective and ef,fective listening behavior and the consequences of both in every day interactions for a variety of contexts including personal, professional and mass mediated.|
CMST 220
On-Camera Performance
This course is designed to develop those skills needed to effectively communicate in front of the camera. The course will explore the principles and applications of various performance techniques involved in a video or film production, and will prov,ide extensive knowledge and practice in the forms and styles of performance for the camera.|
CMST 255
Advanced Debate
Further experience in competitive debating and in a variety of debating forms is provided. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. On demand.|
CMST 260
Special Topics In Comm Studies
Focuses on offering special topics reflecting the interest of students. Content varies from semester to semester. Suitable for both majors and non-majors in speech communication and theatre. May be taken for a maximum of nine credits in the major. On, demand.|
CMST 281
Great Women Speakers
Examines the speeches primarily of American women whose public speaking has had a significant influence on our lives and our culture. Includes the study of speeches and other public communication concerning various social and political issues, moveme,nts and causes from 1800 to the present day. Involves analysis and criticism of the content and delivery of speeches.|
CMST 300
Comm In Organization
Students develop personal communication competencies in contemporary organizations and gain an understanding of the design and function of communication systems within organizations.|
CMST 311
Small Group Decision Making
Trains students to help groups to make decisions. Utilizing techniques such as Nominal Group Technique, Ideawriting, Delphi Method, and Interpretive Structural Modeling, students will help outside clients to make decisions or solve problems.|
CMST 312
Communication & Conflict
This is a performance course designed to help students understand, practice, and improve their communication skills when dealing with conflict. Emphasis is placed on developing communication competencies required for successful management and resolu,tion of conflict when dealing with people one-on-one, in small groups, and at work.|
CMST 320
Communication & Gender
Investigates the effects of gender roles on communication behaviors, such as naming behavior, language acquisitions, professional orientation, conflict management, self-image, dress, and social roles.|
CMST 321
Nonverbal Communication
Increases awareness of students in the areas of nonverbal communication. Describes and analyzes the various concepts of nonverbal communication, applies them to actual situations, and relates them to the entirety of the communication process.|
CMST 322
Lang & Symbol In Hum Comm
Focuses on language and symbols as the processes and effects in human use of verbal, vocal, visual, and video modes in daily interactions. Includes human and non-human communication systems, social and cultural aspects of language acquisition, semant,ics, signs, semiotics, and symbols, as they relate to diverse human communication contexts.|
CMST 331
Comm & Dissenting Voices
Introduces the student of rhetorical theory to the tools for analysis of individuals and groups which seek change in the political and social sphere, outside the normal decision-making process.|
CMST 332
Methods Of Persuasion
Study and practice in persuasive speaking. Includes general theories of persuasion, the role of persuasion in a democratic society, and introduces modern experimental research.|
CMST 333
Environmental Rhetoric
Explores the interface of the environmental science community, the policy-making community, and the public, and analyzes the persuasive and argumentative strategies used by each community in dealing with various environmental issues (such as climate,, waste, fuel, and development issues).|
CMST 360
Leadership Communication
The course provides an overview of the role of communication in leadership in a variety of contexts, including interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and public sphere. It includes theoretical and experiential approaches to effec,tive leadership communication. Students will analyze their personal leadership styles and develop leadership communication skills.|
CMST 410
Rhetorical Criticism
Involves study and application of the major types of rhetorical criticism, including both traditional and contemporary approaches. Utilizes various critical forms to analyze and criticize actual speeches and other forms of the spoken word.|
CMST 411
Org Comm Sem in Consulting
Focuses on the roles and responsibilities of the communication consultant, emphasizing the latest consulting processes, assessment procedures, problem diagnoses, intervention strategies, and client presentations. Designed to facilitate hands-on learn,ing and practical applications. Students will work with outside organizations in completing a communication consulting project. No prerequisite.|
CMST 420
Cross-Cultural Comm
Examines the role played by culture in developing personal attitudes, values, and behavior, and to apply this awareness to communicating across cultural differences in a variety of situations, including interviewing, group discussion, and negotiation,.|
CMST 421
Comm Theories & Pract Applica
Surveys the elements and processes critical to human communication behavior and compares influential communication theories. Emphasizes practical applications of theories.|
CMST 430
Advocacy Campaigns
Campaign Advocacy involves the strategies, actions and proposed solutions to influence decision making at the local, state and federal level. It is designed to promote positive changes that affect people and their environments. Campaign Advocacy ca,n be used to protect rights or change unfair, discriminatory or abusive practice. It is used to gain eligibility for services or change the nature and quality of services to better meet the needs of the individual. It is also used to assist in the,removal of barriers and limitations wich work to prevent full access to full participation in community life.|
CMST 475
Practicum in Communication
Provides students with pre-professional development experiences through participation in designated workshops, training sessions, and co-curricular activities designed to promote the effective practice of communication skills critical to success as c,ommunication professionals.|
CMST 490
Independent Study
Selected topics for research and/or performance projects in speech communication and theatre. Prior to registration, students need to obtain an advisor who will direct their study. Approval by appropriate dean required.|
CMST 495
Intern In Comm Studies
The internship program gives the student the opportunity to apply classroom theory and techniques in business, government, theatre, and other cooperating organizations. Course open to any speech communication and theatre major with a junior or senior, standing with consent of department. Student must have a 2.5 QPA or higher and 3.00 QPA in a major. On demand.|
CMST 602
Seminar Conflict Resolution
This course is designed to help students develop strong communication skills for reacting, interacting, and intervening in conflict situations. It offers a summary and synthesis of research and theory on conflict that guides communication choices fo,r effectively responding to conflict in any environment across personal relationships, small group interactions, management and labor, public adminstration, and education.|
CMST 603
Organizational Communication
This course is designed to help students develop communication skills that enable them to become change masters in the organizations and work groups they are part of. Students will learn an analytical framework to identify key decision variables, an,d ways of behaving and communicating that allow people in oprganizations to make and implement good decisions fast. The course introduces students to issues such as the function of communication in organizational planning, strategy, and marketing; t,he role of communication in organizational transformation and change; the politics of communication in organziations; communication issues in collaboration and negotiation; communication leadership; managing email and written communication; risk comm|
CMST 604
Comm In Instructional Environ
Communication in a variety of instructional contexts, with focuses on communication skills for instructors in business, professions, and education. Emphasis is placed on the literature, philosophies, and theories concerning instructional communicati,on.|
COLB 100
Edin Colb:Intro Germany & Ger
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COLB 101
Sru Collab-Russ Lang & Cult I
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COLB 102
Sru Collaborative Russian Crs
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COLB 103
Sru Collab Russ Lang III
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COLB 201
Collaborative German Course
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COLB 202
Sru Collaborative Interm Russ
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COLB 275
Functional Kinesiology
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COLB 290
Therapeutic Modalities
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COLB 304
Osha General Industrial Safety
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COLB 305
Sru Collaborative Crs Russian
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COLB 306
Sru Colab:20th Cent Russ Lgacy
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COLB 307
Eu Collab Ger Conv & Comp
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COLB 325
Phys Of Exercise-Cal U Col
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COLB 330
Therapeutic Exer-Cal U Colab
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COLB 400
Integ Sport Perform Training
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COOP 301
Coop Anthropology
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COOP 302
Co-Op Phil
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COOP 303
Co-Op Political Science
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COOP 304
Co-Op Sociology
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COOP 305
Co-Op Social Work
|
COOP 306
Co-Op Art
|
COOP 308
Co-Op Biology
|
COOP 309
Co-Op Environ Science
|
COOP 310
Co-Op Outdoor Ed
|
COOP 311
Co-Op Science Ed
|
COOP 312
Co-Op Chemistry
|
COOP 313
Co-Op Communication
|
COOP 314
Co-Op Advertising
|
COOP 315
Co-Op Journalism
|
COOP 316
Co-Op Public Relations
|
COOP 317
Co-Op Radio
|
COOP 318
Co-Op Tv
|
COOP 319
Co-Op Computer Science
|
COOP 320
Co-Op Accounting
|
COOP 321
Co-Op International Bus
|
COOP 322
Co-Op Banking
|
COOP 323
Co-Op Finance
|
COOP 324
Co-Op Management
|
COOP 325
Co-Op Marketing
|
COOP 326
Co-Op Real Estate
|
COOP 327
Co-Op Economics
|
COOP 328
Co-Op Administration
|
COOP 329
Co-Op Office Management
|
COOP 330
Co-Op Mgt Library Sci
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COOP 332
Co-Op Early Childhood
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COOP 333
Co-Op Elementary Ed
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COOP 334
Co-Op Secondary Ed
|
COOP 335
Co-Op Education
|
COOP 336
Co-Op English
|
COOP 337
Co-Op Writing Center
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COOP 338
Co-Op Geography
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COOP 339
Co-Op Earth Science
|
COOP 340
Co-Op Urban Planning
|
COOP 341
Co-Op Health & Safety
|
COOP 342
Co-Op Physical Ed
|
COOP 343
Co-Op Recreation
|
COOP 344
Co-Op Coaching
|
COOP 345
Co-Op Athletic Training
|
COOP 346
Co-Op Water Safety
|
COOP 347
Co-Op Sport Management
|
COOP 348
Co-Op History
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COOP 349
Co-Op Humanities
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COOP 350
Co-Op Library Science
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COOP 351
Co-Op Media
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COOP 352
Co-Op Math
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COOP 355
Co-Op French
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COOP 356
Co-Op German
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COOP 357
Co-Op Russian
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COOP 358
Co-Op Spanish
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COOP 360
Co-Op Music
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COOP 361
Co-Op Piano
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COOP 362
Co-Op Instrumentals
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COOP 363
Co-Op Vocal
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COOP 364
Co-Op Music Marketing
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COOP 366
Co-Op Physics
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COOP 368
Co-Op Psychology
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COOP 369
Co-Op Counseling
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COOP 370
Co-Op Student Life Serv
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COOP 371
Co-Op Student Affairs
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COOP 372
Co-Op Acad Supp Serv
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COOP 374
Co-Op Human Relations
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COOP 376
Co-Op Sped
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COOP 377
Co-Op Rehab Sciences
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COOP 378
Co-Op Learn Disab
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COOP 379
Co-Op Ment Retard
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COOP 381
Co-Op Speech Pathology
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COOP 382
Co-Op Audiology
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COOP 383
Co-Op Speech
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COOP 384
Co-Op Theatre
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COOP 385
Co-Op/Respiratory Care
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COOP 386
Co-Op Nursing
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COOP 387
Co-Op Med Tech
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COOP 388
Coop - Allied Health
COOP 388 provides as elective co-operational educational experience for allied health students who have achieved junior standing. COOP 388 will augment concepts and skills learned in technical studies and Clarion courses in a structured and supervise,d clinical environment that enhances independent and effective functioning as a health care professional. Students electing COOP 388 must be enrolled in or have completed an approved technical educational program and must have a minimum 2.5 QPA at Cl,arion or in technical course work. Co-op experiences must be approved in advance by the Allied Health Chair. COOP 388 is offered as credit-no-record. Prerequisite: Enrollment in or completion of an approved technical health care educational program|
COOP 389
Co-Op Continuing Ed
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COOP 390
Co-Op Academic Services
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COOP 391
Co-Op Financial Aid
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COOP 392
Co-Op Research
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COOP 393
Co-Op Admissions
|
COOP 395
Co-Op L E I P
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COOP 396
Coop Paralegal
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COOP 397
Coop Planetarium
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COOP 398
Co-Op/Women & Gender Studies
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COOP 401
Intrn-Anthropology
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COOP 402
Intrn Phil
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COOP 403
Intrn Political Science
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COOP 404
Intrn Sociology
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COOP 405
Intrn-Social Work
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COOP 406
Intrn-Art
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COOP 408
Intrn-Biology
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COOP 409
Intrn-Environ Ed
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COOP 410
Intrn-Outdoor Ed
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COOP 411
Intrn-Science Ed
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COOP 412
Intrn-Chemistry
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COOP 413
Intrn-Communication
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COOP 414
Intrn-Advertising
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COOP 415
Intrn-Journalism
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COOP 416
Intrn-Public Relations
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COOP 417
Intrn-Radio
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COOP 418
Intrn-Tv
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COOP 419
Intrn-Computer Science
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COOP 420
Intrn-Accounting
|
COOP 421
Intrn-International Bus
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COOP 422
Intrn-Banking
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COOP 423
Intrn-Finance
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COOP 424
Intrn-Management
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COOP 425
Intrn-Marketing
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COOP 426
Intrn-Real Estate
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COOP 427
Intrn-Economics
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COOP 428
Intrn-Admin
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COOP 429
Intrn-Off Management
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COOP 430
Intrn-Mgt Library Sce
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COOP 432
Intrn Early Childhood
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COOP 433
Intrn-Elementary Ed
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COOP 434
Intrn-Secondary Ed
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COOP 435
Intrn-Education
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COOP 436
Intrn-English
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COOP 437
Intrn-Writing Center
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COOP 438
Intrn-Geography
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COOP 439
Intrn-Earth Science
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COOP 440
Intrn-Urban Planning
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COOP 441
Intrn-Health & Safety
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COOP 442
Intrn-Physical Ed
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COOP 443
Intrn-Recreation
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COOP 444
Intrn-Coaching
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COOP 445
Intrn-Athletic Training
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COOP 446
Intrn-Water Safety
|
COOP 447
Intrn-Sport Management
|
COOP 448
Intrn-History
|
COOP 449
Intrn-Humanities
|
COOP 450
Intrn-Library Science
|
COOP 451
Intrn-Media
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COOP 452
Intrn-Math
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COOP 455
Intrn-French
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COOP 456
Intrn-German
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COOP 457
Intrn-Russian
|
COOP 458
Intrn-Spanish
|
COOP 460
Intrn-Music
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COOP 461
Intrn-Piano
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COOP 462
Intrn Instrumentals
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COOP 463
Intrn-Vocal
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COOP 464
Intrn-Mus Marketing
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COOP 466
Intrn-Physics
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COOP 468
Intrn-Psychology
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COOP 469
Intrn-Counseling
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COOP 470
Intrn-Student Life Serv
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COOP 471
Intrn-Student Affairs
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COOP 472
Intrn-Acad Supp Serv
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COOP 474
Intrn-Human Relations
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COOP 476
Intrn-Sped
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COOP 477
Intrn-Rehab Sciences
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COOP 478
Intrn-Learning Disab
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COOP 479
Intrn-Ment Retard
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COOP 480
Intern/Allied Health
COOP 480 provides an elective internship experience for allied health students who have achieved senior standing. COOP 480 serves as a culminating clinical/professional experience that reinforces independent and effective functioning of students as h,ealth care professionals and facilitates consideration of leadership dynamics in health care environments. Students electing COOP 480 must be enrolled in or have completed an approved technical educational program and must have a minimum 2.5 QPA at C,larion or in technical course work. Internships must be approved in advance by the Allied Health Chair and the SONAH Director. COOP 480 is offered as credit-no-record. Prerequisite: Enrollment in or completion of an approved technical health care ed|
COOP 481
Intrn-Speech Path
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COOP 482
Intrn-Audiology
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COOP 483
Intrn-Speech
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COOP 484
Intrn-Theatre
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COOP 486
Intrn-Nursing
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COOP 487
Intrn-Med Tech
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COOP 489
Intrn-Continuing Ed
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COOP 490
Intrn-Academic Services
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COOP 491
Intrn-Financial Aid
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COOP 492
Intrn-Research
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COOP 493
Intrn-Admissions
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COOP 495
Intrn-L E I P
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COOP 496
Internship Paralegal
|
COOP 497
Intrn-Planetarium
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COOP 498
Intern/Women & Gender Studies
|
CPSC 101
Intro To Computational Science
This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of Computational Science, which integrates mathematical modeling and visualization to solve problems in the physical, life, behavioral, and social sciences. Students will acquire skills i,n the development of scientific knowledge using experimentation with models and simulation of scientific systems. Prerequisite: MATH 171 or permission of the instructor.|
CPSC 201
Surv Computational Sci Tools
This course presents methods and tools used to implement concepts in mathematics and computational science. The tools will include mathematical and statistical functions such as matrix manipulation and linear algebra, polynomials and interpolation,,data analysis and statistics, and optimization. This course will prepare students for further work in mathematics and computational science. Prerequisite: MATH 171. Each semester.|
CPSC 301
Adv Computational Science
This course combines a formal presentation of classical methods of design optimization with detailed instruction in the application of these methods using software tools. It introduces students to the symbolic, numerical, and graphic features of the,se software tools and integrates this powerful combination in the translation of many algorithms into applied optimization techniques with animation. Prerequisite: MATH 260 or MATH 270|
CPSC 490
Projects Computational Science
This course applies computational science methods and tools to real-world applications in a semester-long project in the student's major field of study. This is the capstone course in computational science. Prerequisite: CPSC 301|
CRJT 110
Intro to Criminal Justice
Provides an overview of the justice system including processing offenders. Examines the nature of criminal law, causes of criminal behavior and discusses the roles of various agencies including police, courts, and corrections. Fall and Spring semes,ters.|
CRJT 235
Criminology
Examines historical and contemporary attempts to explain the origins of criminal behavior and society's reaction to it from a variety of perspectives. Provides students with an understanding of how these theories have influenced the present criminal, justice systems. Annually|
CRJT 245
Corrections
Provides students with an overview and analysis of the management and organization of correctional institutions. Discusses current practices and trends in the area of corrections including treatment of criminal personalities. Annually|
CRJT 255
Juvenile Justice
Examines the formal and informal methods of dealing with the problems of juvenile crime, including the ways in which procedures differ from those involving adult offenders. Provides an analysis of recent trends in juvenile courts and the control an,d treatment of juvenile offenders. Annually.|
CRJT 260
Policing
Provides an overview of issues in policing and law enforcement as well as an examination of the practices of police agencies in the United States. Examines organizational structures for delivering police services and issues concerning police and com,munity interactions. Annually|
CRJT 275
Substantive Crim Justice Law
Examination of the preliminary crimes of solicitation, conspiracy, and attempt. An analysis of the specific elements of crimes against the person and crimes against property. A consideration of defenses to alleged criminal behavior is also undertak,en. Annually.|
CRJT 304
Crime, Politic & Public Policy
Course treats the ways in which government treats crime as a public policy matter, with a predominant focus on legislative and executive branch activity. Topics may vary somewhat from year to year. Examples of policies to be examined and evaluated,include: reducing the incidence of crime, the politics of imprisonment, punitive and restorative justice, decriminalization, drugs and crime, death penalty, gun control, hate crimes, zero tolerance approaches, pornography, corporate crime, organize,d crime, and terrorism. The constitutional and legal framework of policies will also be considered.|
CRJT 325
Special Topic Criminal Justice
This course will investigate special topics within the criminal justice system.|
CRJT 328
Ethics and Criminal Justice
This course is a survey of ethical issues for practitioners within the criminal justice system. Topics include: ethics of decision-making, origins of the concept of justice, dilemmas of police officers as crime fighters and public servants, fighting, corruption, ethics and investigative methods, ethics as it relates to punishment, institutional and community corrections.|
CRJT 363
Criminal Procedure
A study of the law as it relates to arrest, search, and seizure with emphasis on present controlling legal decisions and historical development, philosophy, and public policy issues underlying these decisions. Prerequisite: PS 211, CRJT 110 or permi,ssion of instructor. Annually|
CRJT 399
Criminal Justice CO-OP
Internship opportunities for students in their particular area of interest with local or state institutions.|
CSD 125
Intro Comm Disorders
Introduces communication disorders. Encompasses the variety of problems humans may have in speech, language, and hearing. Focuses on the nature of such problems, their causes, their impacts on people, methods for their evaluation, and methods for the,ir management. Includes an orientation to the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.|
CSD 150
Speech Science
Analyzes models of the speech mechanism. Emphasizes normal aspects of the physiology and acoustics of speech production. Fall, annually.|
CSD 156
Phonetics & Phonology
Transcription of normal and deviant speech using the International Phonetic Alphabet. Applies phonetics and phonemics to language and speech pathology. Explores instruments used in speech and hearing. Spring, annually.|
CSD 251
Anat Speech Hear Mech
Study of the anatomy and physiology of the speech and hearing mechanisms. Fall, annually.|
CSD 257
Dev Seq in Lang Speech
Study of the development of language and speech in the normal child. Normative data in speech and language development are studied.|
CSD 258
Lang Disorders In Childr
Provides students with an understanding of language disorders in children, etiological factors associated with them, diagnostic and evaluative techniques, and therapeutic methodologies. Prerequisite: CSD 257. Spring, annually.|
CSD 290
Speech, Lang & The Young Child
Emphasizes the language development of young children as a portion of their physical, cognitive and social-emotional growth from birth to eight years of age. Provides a framework for observation of normally developing phonological, morphosyntactical,, semantic, and pragmatic skills in the young child as well as the documented changes which can be observed in the child with a language disorder. Focuses on the role physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and linguistic factors play in the preliter,acy and early literacy experience. Prerequisite: ED 110, ED 121, ECH 235.|
CSD 352
Speech Disorders
Begins with an overview of the professions of speech pathology and audiology. Discusses communication disorders using the theoretical basis for service delivery models, communicative development, and cultural differences. Emphasizes diagnosis, team m,anagement, and treatment strategies of articulation, voice, resonance, and stuttering disorders. Observation experience is provided. Fall, annually.|
CSD 353
Adult Comm Disorders
Reviews the theoretical basis for communication disorders. Emphasizes diagnosis, team management, and treatment strategies of adult language disorders such as aphasia, apraxia, and swallowing disorders.|
CSD 357
Applied Linguistics
Study of linguistics fundamentals and theories. Explores specific techniques for analyzing phonological, morphosyntactical, semantic, and pragmatic aspects of speech/language in children and adults. Emphasizes the application of these assessment resu,lts to clinical practice. Prerequisite: ENG 263.|
CSD 359
Autism & Comm Competence
Emphasis will be placed on the speech, language, communication and behavioral concerns of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A team approach will be emphasized as clinical methods for assessment of and intervention of language and soci,al communication skills are introduced.|
CSD 422
Clinical Externship
Supervised observation of and participation in clinic and/or school environments. Provides observational experience.|
CSD 433
Instrm & Psychoacoustics
Deals with instruments used in a speech and hearing program and also covers basic principles of hearing science. Provides some information on psychoacoustics. Spring, annually.|
CSD 454
Professional Practicum
Explores current professional issues and trends in the practice of speech-language pathology and audiology. Includes licensure and certification. Emphasizes ethical/legal restrictions and obligations that influence professional practitioners.|
CSD 455
Spch Lang & Hear Prob
|
CSD 460
Intro To Audiology
Investigates the nature of hearing disorders and the audiological, medical, social, psychological, and educational implications. Fall, annually.|
CSD 463
Aural Rehabilitation
A comprehensive study of auditory rehabilitation, emphasizing auditory training, speech reading, and speech training. Prerequisite: CSD 460. Spring, annually.|
CSD 465
Manual Communication
Covers a comprehensive review of the theories of manual communication, including an introduction to the major manual communication systems. Students learn to sign and finger spell for use in communicating with and rehabilitation of the deaf and hard,of hearing.|
CSD 467
Clinical Observation
Covers basic information pertaining to the profession of speech pathology and audiology. Provides an orientation to the facilities, equipment, and operations of the Clarion University Speech and Hearing Clinic. Examines various types of clinical repo,rts and teaches basic observational skills both in the classroom and clinic as a prerequisite for client contact for speech and hearing science majors.|
CSD 472
Sem In Speech Science
Begins with a review of the speech mechanism as a servosystem and transducer, and basic knowledge of the physics of sound. Focuses on the concept that the speech mechanism is a chain of events physiologically, acoustically, and perceptually. Examines, each link in this chain of events in terms of basic knowledge, pertinent research, and each link's contribution to the speech chain as a whole. Prerequisite: CSD 156.|
CSD 475
Augmentative & Altern Comm
Introduces the student to various augmentative/alternative communication systems prevalent in the field. Current and comprehensive information relative to type of disorder. Disgnosis and treatment discussed. Emphasizes the application of unique crite,ria in diagnostic and the administration of competent and flexible management strategies in rehabilitation. Fall, annually.|
CSD 498
Special Topics
Examines various areas of speech pathology and audiology. Professor selects format most suitable to the study. May be offered on request of students, subject to the availability of staff. Enrollment by consent of the instructor. On demand.|
CSD 499
Independent Study Csd
Provides students with an opportunity to explore an area of special need or interest in speech pathology and audiology in depth under the supervision of a member of the department. Students must develop a proposed study plan and secure the approval o,f the proposed director and department chair prior to registration. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.|
CSD 500
Aphasia
A comprehensive study of the neuroanatomical implications related to acquired aphasia (dysphasia) in adulthood, although study of the symptoms and treatment of both sensory states and motor disturbances in aphasia is made. The current literature is r,eviewed and facilities are investigated. Opportunities are provided for the student to participate in individual and group therapy, and for visits to centers where these types of problems are diagnosed and treated. Guidance and counseling are provide,d to design an independent study in this area.|
CSD 505
Artic & Phono Diso Child
Articulatory and phonological features of the American English sound system are examined in relation to other developing linguistic functions. The assessment of disordered articulatory and phonological behavior is stressed, and differential diagnosis, is emphasized. Based upon several traditional and current theoretical models, possibilities for therapeutic interventions are presented.|
CSD 510
Sem In Neuropathology
A comprehensive study of pathologies of the central nervous system. Methods for identifying and treating speech, language, and communication problems associated with progressive and non-progressive neurological disorders are explored. Neuropathologie,s studied include dementia, syndromes associated with right-hemisphere lesions, and deficits subsequent to closed-head injury. A unit on normal swallow and dysphagia is included in the course. Opportunity will be provided for independent investigatio,n and clinical participation.|
CSD 512
Clinical Practice I
Course entails practice, under supervision, in assessment and management of individuals with disorders of speech language or hearing.|
CSD 513
Comm Disorders Mult Population
Emphasizes nature and treatment of communication disorders in culturally and linguistically diverse populations. The scope of practice and role of speech-language pathologists with bilingual/bicultural clients with and without speech and language dis,orders will be addressed. Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Fall semester, annually|
CSD 515
Maxillofacial Anomalies
A comprehensive study of clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with communicative disorders related to clefting and/or associated syndromes. Current research regarding anatomy and physiology of the palate and velopharyngeal structures for spee,ch production is detailed. The genetics of clefting and associated syndromes is discussed. Special attention is directed to early growth and development of infants with clefts. Opportunities for observation of a craniofacial team multidisciplinary ev,aluations and team planning are provided in medical settings.|
CSD 520
Lang Disorders In Child
Models of the language function with their justifications are identified and critically analyzed. A review of normal language development is included to provide comparison with deviations. Diagnostic procedures utilized with language disorders in chi,ldren are investigated; therapeutic means to influence them will be presented. Differential diagnostic specifics of certain language disorders such as those associated with deafness, autism, mental retardation, and language learning disabilities are,included.|
CSD 522
Clinical Externship
Supervised observation of and participation in school and/or clinic environments. Prerequisite: CSD 540.|
CSD 525
Stuttering
Emphasizes investigation of the major theories and therapies of stuttering. Theories of etiology and of development of stuttering are included. The development of an understanding of stuttering behavior and similar speech behavior is included. Manage,ment strategies and therapies are also investigated.|
CSD 530
Voice
Includes the study of human voice and its manifestations across the life span. Students will be acquainted with new developments, issues, and trends that cover the entire spectrum of voice perception and production, including vocal development and li,fe span changes, and the continuum of voice production from disorders through superior performance. Focus will include pathophysiology of disorders, instrumental and noninstrumental assessment, interdisciplinary team management, and treatment.|
CSD 533
Instrm & Psychoacoustics
Deals with instruments used in a speech and hearing program and also covers basic principles of hearing science. Provides some information on psychoacoustics. Spring, annually.|
CSD 534
Otolaryngology
An introduction to the profession of otolaryngology. The course is taught by a board-certified physician and offered once a year.|
CSD 535
Audiology Seminar I
Course is divided into two three-credit seminars. The first covers etiologies of hearing loss and disorders of the central auditory system, the effects of hearing loss on communication, diagnosis and clinical methods. The second covers aural rehabi,litation procedures.|
CSD 540
Clinical Practice
This course entails practice, under supervision, in applying theory to the assessment and management of individuals from preschool through adulthood having significant disorders of speech, hearing, or language. The clinical experience is relatively i,ndependent in the assessment, organizing, and carrying out of effective plans of therapy. The student should demonstrate an interdisciplinary approach and be able to generalize on the area of the disorder treated, as well as deal appropriately with t,he specific clients treated.|
CSD 550
Motor Speech Disorders
Explores the causes, nature, and dynamics of both developmental and acquired forms of the motor speech disorders of apraxia and dysarthria. The specific nature of speech disturbances associated with lesions of the motor system and current diagnostic,protocols and management strategies associated with each identified.|
CSD 554
Professional Practicum
Explores current issues and trends in the practice of speech-languagepathology. Includes licensure, certification and specialty recognition. Emphasizes ethical/legal restrictions and obligations that influence professional practitioners.|
CSD 560
Counseling In Comm Disorders
Emphasizes the application of counseling strategies in the administration of diagnostic and therapeutic services as they relate to the field of communication disorders. Addresses counseling strategies relative to the nature of the communicative disor,der and cultural background of the client. Annually.|
CSD 575
Augmentative & Altern Comm
This course is designed to introduce the student to various augmentative/alternative communication systems prevalent in the field. Current and comprehensive information relative to type of disorder, diagnosis, and treatment will be discussed. An emph,asis will be placed on the application of unique criteria in diagnostics and the administration of competent and flexible management strategies in rehabilitation. Fall, annually.|
CSD 589
Research Meth Comm Disorders
Research literature and methods in communication disorders with an emphasis on research design and application.|
CSD 590
Research
Students may complete a study in speech or language pathology and audiology or related areas under the supervision of a staff member. Students may select the thesis option in which six credits are required. Students may select the research option in,which three or six credits culminate in a written report presented to the faculty advisor. Types of investigations which might be completed are original studies, comprehensive literature reviews, replication of studies, or completion of a portion of,a larger study. Students must fill out independent study forms with their research advisor before registering for CSD 590.|
CSD 592
Dysphagia
Presents an introduction to swallowing disorders including basic terminology, anatomical and physiological etiologies, and current assessment and management procedures, with special attention to laryngectomized and tracheotomized patients. Discusses,the competencies, responsibilities, and roles of the speech pathologist in various clinical settings, as well as risk factors involved in patient care. Provides observations and experiential learning situations.|
CSD 598
Special Topics
Topics in various areas of speech pathology and audiology. The format used will be selected by the professor as most suitable to the study. The course may be offered on request of students, subject to the availability of staff. Enrollment by consent,of the instructor. On demand.|
CSD 599
Independent Study Csd
Designed to provide students with an opportunity to explore an area of special need or interest in speech pathology and audiology in depth under the supervision of a member of the department. Students must develop a proposed study plan and secure the, approval of the proposed director and department chair prior to registration. Repeatable for a maximum of 6 semester hours.|
ECH 120
Child Care Health Advocate
Ensuring the health and safety of children is a fundamental component of an early childhood program. This course emphasizes the promotion of the health and safety of children, including recognizing and correcting health and safety problems. This cour,se focuses on best practices in health safety and nutrition for young children.|
ECH 122
Preschool Develop & Learning
Acquisition of understanding and appreciation of the cognitive, social-emotional, ecological-systems, and physical-motor dimensions of human growth and changes during the preschool years. Emphasizes cultural influences on human growth and change with, respect to cognition, learning theories, individual differences, personality, growth, abilities and interests. Explores cross-cultural and multiethnic perspectives with respect to holistic development of preschoolers; involvement with and observatio,n of preschoolers.|
ECH 123
Mid Chld & Adolescent Dev Lrn
Acquistion of understanding and appreciation of the cognitive, social-emotional, ecological-systems, and physical-motor dimensions of human growth and changes during middle childhood. Emphasizes cultural influences on human growth and change with res,pect to cognition, learning theories, individual differences, personality, growth, abilities, and interests. Explores cross-cultural and multiethnic perspectives with respect to holistic development os school age children and adolescents; involvement, with and observation of school-aged children and adolscents.|
ECH 124
Infant & Toddler Dev & Learn
This course will provide information that will allow students to identify the characteristics of and design effective and developmentally appropriate learning environments for young children that promote interaction, exploration and knowledge constru,ction. In addition, experiential opportunities will be developed which allow the student to apply this knowledge to various age groups of children.|
ECH 231
Creativity In Early Child Curr
Explores the nature of creativity and its value in the growth of young children. Students develop and present various open-ended and child-centered projects for the enhancement of creativity and the creative whole learning experience using art, musi,c, and movement. Students demonstrate how to guide young children in creative learning and expression through individual and group projects. Examines the creative process as a source of choosing content, planning lessons, organizing materials, and,designing assignments to enable children to develop essential skills and attitudes for creativity. In addition, experimental opportunities will be developed which allow the students to apply this knowledge to various age groups of children. Prerequ|
ECH 233
Puppetry In Early Child Curr
Participants will learn the knowledge and skills necessary to implement the use of puppets in the Early Childhood classroom and to appreciate the power of puppets as a vehicle in developing creativity, imagination and self-expression in children. To,pics will focus on play, the history of puppets, types of puppets, and the use of puppets in Early Childhood Curriculum.|
ECH 234
Observ & Assess Early Child Ed
Young children from birth to age eight are cared for and educated in diverse early childhood settings. Gives undergraduate students experience in using effective methods for observing, assessing, and documenting young children's development for the,purpose of planning appropriate programs, environments, interactions, and adaptations. Emphasizes developmentally appropriate practices and legal and ethical responsibilities. Directs students' participation with children of different age groups in, a variety of early childhood settings through field-based/case study approaches. Includes 20 hours of field placement. Prerequisite: ED 121. Offered Annually.|
ECH 235
Obs: Const Ech Knowledge Base
Young children from birth to age nine are cared for and educated in diverse early childhood settings. Gives undergraduate students experience in using effective methods for observing young children's development, environments, interactions, and adap,tations while constructing a wide early childhood knowledge base. Emphasizes developmentally appropriate practices and legal and ethical responsibilities. Directs students' participation with children of different age groups in a variety of early c,hildhood settings through field-based/case study approaches. Includes one hour of class meetings with two-hour field placement per week. Prerequisites: Straight early childhood majors and dual early childhood/elementary majors must take ED 110 and|
ECH 236
Assess/Plan Ech Knowledge Base
Young children from birth to age nine are cared for and educated in diverse early childhood settings. Gives undergraduate students experience in using effective methods for observing, assessing, and documenting young children's development for the p,urpose of planning appropriate programs, environments, interactions, and adaptations. Emphasizes developmentally appropriate practices and legal and ethical responsibilities. Directs students' participation with children of different age groups in,a variety of early childhood settings through field-based/case study approaches. Includes two hours of class meetings with one-hour field placement per week. Field experience assignments are designed for the students to use various types of assessm|
ECH 240
Nutrition & The Young Child
Acquisition and appreciation of the role nutrition plays in the development of the young child. Students will acquire knowledge, skills, and attitudes in planning nutritious meals and snacks. An awareness of the role of the family will be emphasize,d. Offered on a two-year rotation.|
ECH 245
Lang & Lit In Early Childhood
This course will provide information that will allow students to identify specific developmental milestones in speech/language development. In addition, information related to cognitive, social-emotional, and physical growth will be analyzed and syn,thesized as it relates to the overall maturation of the child and specifically to the speech and language development. Finally, experiential opportunities will be developed which allow the student to evaluate and apply this knowledge to various age,groups of children.|
ECH 260
Early Childhood Environments
This course will provide information that will allow students to identify the characteristics of and design effective and developmentally appropriate learning environments for young children that promote interaction, exploration and knowledge constru,ction. In addition, experiential opportunities will be developed which allow the student to apply this knowledge to various age groups of children.|
ECH 290
Speech, Lang & The Young Child
Emphasizes the language development of young children as a portion of their physical, cognitive and social-emotional growth from birth to eight years of age. Provides a framework for observation of normally developing phonological, morphosyntactical,, semantic, and pragmatic skills in the young child as well as the documented changes which can be observed in the child with a language disorder. Focuses on the role physical, cognitive, social-emotional, and linguistic factors play in the preliter,acy and early literacy experience. Prerequisite: ED 110, ED 121, ECH 235.|
ECH 300
Early Childhood Block
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ECH 301
Child Development & Guidance
This course will provide information that will allow students to understand the process of child guidance and master techniques in child guidance. Through increased knowledge of child development, students will gain understanding of effective child,guidance strategies. Experimental opportunities will be developed which allow the student to develop his or her own approaches to child guidance.|
ECH 310
Family-Community Collaboration
This course will provide information that will allow students to identify the benefits of family-teacher partnerships, methods for developing partnerships with families and community members. In addition, information related to Family Systems Theory,, including the Ecological Systems Theory, collaborating with other professionals and role of the early childhood professional in the community, including advocacy will be discussed and practiced. Finally, experiential opportunities will be develope,d which allow the student to develop relationships and work collaboratively with families and community members.|
ECH 320
Dev Bases For Lrn & Tch
Acquisition of understanding and appreciation of advanced child development for young children birth through eight years. Examines the physical, social, emotional, linguistic, and intellectual characteristics of children of diverse cultural backgroun,ds within and outside of the United States. Focuses on both typical and atypical development as well as challenging conditions. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 322, 323, 325, 413, and HPE 410. Prerequisites: ED 121 and ECH 235. Each semester.|
ECH 322
Curr Bases For Lrn & Tch
Focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum design and implementation and the Pennsylvania Standards Aligned System, including the Common Core for infants, toddlers, and young children ages three to nine. Emphasizes the child's and the teacher,'s roles in designing, integrating, and adapting curriculum and the physical setting where the curriculum is implemented to meet the needs and interests of all young children including those with disabilities, developmental delays, or special abiliti,es, including instrucyional strategies and classroom materials. Field experience includes planning, designing, intergrating and implementing curriculum activities with young children. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 301, ECH 310, ECH 323, and ECH|
ECH 323
Lang, Lit And The Young Child
Emphasizes three areas: (1) promoting the understanding a learning environment should match how children develop and learn literacy, (2) creating an integrated curriculum for the birth through five years that are linked to standards and benchmark com,petencies, and (3) enhancing the literacy development of children through appropriate interactions with families and caregivers. Field experience includes teaching literacy lessons to young children and sharing literacy materials and activities with, families. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 301, ECH 310, ECH 322, and ECH 325. For straight ECH majors, ECH 413 must be taken with these courses. Prerequisites: ECH 235, ECH 236. Straight early childhood majors must have also taken ECH 245 an|
ECH 325
Yng Childr As Theory Bld
Explores the process and learning environment that will support, facilitate, and translate course-content areas of science, mathematics, social studies, and technology into a developmentally appropriate constructivist educational practice. Applies t,heoretical perspective of constructivism to enhance the young child's scientific traits of experimentation, curiosity, creativity, and theory test. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 310, ECH 322, and ECH 325. For straight ECH majors, ECH 413 must, be taken with these courses. Prerequisites: ECH 235, ECH 236. Straight early childhood majors must have also taken ECH 245 and ECH 260.|
ECH 410
Motor Learning & Development
Provides understanding of motor development and motor learning and how motor activities enhance the total development of young children. Emphasizes the design and implementation of open-ended, developmentally appropriate movement activities to stimul,ate problem solving and to be the cornerstone of an integrated curriculum. Additional focus on assessment of motor development and motor learning environments. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 320, 322, 323, 325, and 413. Prerequisites: ED 121. Ea,ch semester.|
ECH 413
Leadership in Ech Settings
Explores knowledge and skills needed to be a leader in early childhood. Emphasis will be placed on developing and managing a caring learning environment that enhances positive interactions among children, parents, staff, instructional teams, and com,munity members. Focus will be on leadership skills in advocacy for families and educational and social systems, and other issues related to families and young children. Grant-writing, advocacy and ethics of professionalism will also be explored.,Field experience will consist of a Stand for Children advocacy project. Prerequisites: ECH 231, ECH 235, ECH 323, ECH 245, ECH 260. Taken concurrently with ECH 301, ECH 310, ECH 322, ECH 323, ECH 325. Each semester.|
ECH 414
Tch & Lrn Lang & Lit-Grade 1-4
Overview of current definitions and basic approaches in literacy assessment and instruction in the primary grades. Investigates literacy development and important instructional considerations for teachers of learners in the primary grades. Prerequi,sites: ECH 235, ECH 236, ECH 301, ECH 310, ECH 322, ECH 323, ECH 325. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 415, ECH 416, ECH 418, and HPE 410.|
ECH 415
Lrn & Tch Math-Grade 1-4
Focuses on principles in teaching mathematics to young children, mathematics processes in early childhood, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, and involving and assisting parents and commun,ities in understanding childhood development in mathematics. Field experience opportunities will allow the teacher candidate to plan and teach mathematics lessons to children in grades one through four.|
ECH 416
Lrn & Tch Soc Study: Grades1-4
This course coordinates theory and practice in the teaching of early childhood schooll social studies. It provides historical perspective, and examines current research, curriculum programs and trends, and methods and materials applicable to social,studies teaching in a pluralistic society. ECH 416 emphasizes the development, selection, management and evaluation of materials and experiences that foster concept development, inquiry, and knowledge construction in social studies. The course also, addresses the needs of diverse students populations, integration of content areas and application of technology. Field experience opportunities will allow the student to plan and teach social studies lessons to children in grades 1-4. Prerequisite|
ECH 417
Tech For Early Chld Educators
This course is designed to facilitate future early childhood educators with the knowledge skills, and dispositions for integrating technology into their classroom instruction and for using technology to improve professional productivity. Students wil,l explore the relationship among ISTE (International Society for Technology in Education) standards, NAEYC (National Association for the Education of Young Children) standards, and PA Learning standards for Early Childhood and those PA Academic Stand,ards related to PreK-4 learners and the appropriate and effective uses of contemporary educational technology. These concepts will be applied to the development of instructional materials that can be used for assessing learning and promoting achievem|
ECH 418
Lrn & Tch Science-Grades 1-4
Focuses on principles in teaching science to young children, scientific inquiry and processes in early childhood, the National Science Teachers Association and National Science Education Standards, and involving and assisting parents and communities,in understanding childhood development in mathematics. Emphasis will also be placed on developing effective learning environments to promote science explorations, investigation and inquiry. Field Experience opportunities will allow the teacher cand,idate to plan and teach science lessons to children in grades one through four. Prerequisites: Early Childhood Core ECH 235, ECH 236, and PreK-K Block (ECH 301, ECH 310, ECH 322, ECH 323, ECH 325). Must be taken concurrently with EH 414, ECH 415, E|
ECH 420
Iss & Advocacy In Ech Ed
Examines incidental learning of children through their interactions with the people and society's major institutions. In-depth exploration of the family as a diverse and primary institution influencing children and the interface with the educational,and social systems. Analyzes current issues and public policies as related to systems theory. Topics vary by semester. Emphasizes advocacy and ethics of professionals to help young children cope with issues that affect them and will contribute to ins,titutional change to meet the needs of young children. Prerequisite: ECH 322 and ECH 413. Annually.|
ECH 424
Early Child Student Tch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school and agency settings. After an orientation to the school and agency setting, students teach under the direc,tion of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels (N-K, 3), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals,. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and m|
ECH 425
Early Child Student Tch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school and agency settings. After an orientation to the school and agency setting, students teach under the direc,tion of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels (N-K, 3), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals,. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and m|
ECH 501
Early Child Curr & Instruct
Early Childhood Curriculum and Instruction focuses on developmentally appropriate curriculum design and implementation and the Pennsylvania Standards Aligned System, including the Common Core for infants, toddlers, and young children. Emphasis will b,e given to teaching to enhance development and learning, constructing appropriate curriculum, creating a caring community of learners, and establishing reciprocal relationships with families. Offered on demand.|
ECH 502
Early Child Curr & Assessment
Early Childhood Curriculum and Assessment will focus on the assessment of individual infants, toddlers, and young children's development and learning as an essential component of planning and implementing appropriate curriculum. The importance of the, learning community and family relationships to appropriate assessment will be emphasized. Action research will be conducted utilizing developmentally appropriate assessment practices. Prerequisite: ECH 501. Summer, on demand.|
ECH 505
Healthy Infant, Toddler & Chld
Exploration of the factors that effect and support the development of a healthy lifestyle in infants, toddlers, and young children. Knowledge and skills will be developed in understanding and appreciating foundations and development of movement, heal,th and safety issues, programmatic development, and building partnerships. Summer, on demand.|
ECH 510
Leadership In Ech Ed & Care
Leadership in Early Childhood Education and Care will explore and develop the key components in the design of a quality early childhood program and in the development of visionary leadership skills. Participants will be guided through the areas of ne,ed assessment, licensing and accreditation procedures, financial matters, curriculum, environment, policies, management skills, community support, and staff development and mentoring. Summer, on demand.|
ECH 512
Sprt Chil In Homes,Sch & Comm
This course will examine the factors in families and society that influence young children as they grow. Students will review data and current trends and identify successful models of supporting children and families. Various cultures, family forms,, learning styles and physical and mental abilities will be studied. Emphasis will be placed on collaboration between schools, homes and communities.|
ECH 520
Iss & Advocacy in Ech Ed
Examines incidental learning of children through their interactions with the people and society's major institutions. In-depth exploration of the family as a diverse and primary institution influencing children and the interface with the educational,and social systems. Analyzes current issues and public policies as related to systems theory. Topics vary by semester. Emphasizes advocacy and ethics of professional to help young children cope with issues that affect them and will contribute to inst,itutional change to meet the needs of young children. Annually|
ECON 140
Pers Money Mgmt & Cons Econ
Examines major aspects of personal financial management, including budgeting of income and expenditures, transactions, and relations with banks and other lending institutions, insurance and retirement plans, home ownership, personal taxes, savings, a,nd investment plans. B.S.B.A. majors may apply this course only as a free elective. Each semester.|
ECON 150
Econ Aspects Of Aging
Introductory analysis of economic factors associated with an aging population. Includes the economics of providing for income maintenance, housing, health care, social service, and leisure activities. Discusses the economic implications of individual,s and the economy. Spring, biennially.|
ECON 161
Global Bus & Econ Issues
Introduction to basic principles of economics through the examination of contemporary global economic problems. Issues include basic economic development and trade, economic causes of global conflict, patterns of international capital flows, global,energy dependence, and international human capital transfers. The course is aimed at developing a basic understanding of the economic dimension of global business and political issues. Every Fall.|
ECON 175
Free Ent & Pub Policy
Introduces the history of economics as a social science, the theory and application of microeconomics and macroeconomics, international economics, and economic alternatives in current social problems. Freshman-level course can be used only as general, education elective in either the associate's degree program or the baccalaureate degree programs. Majors in the College of Business Administration are excluded from the course. Each semester.|
ECON 202
Ecological Economics
Examines the interdependence between the economy and the environment. Analyzes alternative theories of justice used in deciding environmental issues. Explores economic perspectives of problem resolutions in general and with respect to specific enviro,nmental problems. Spring, annually.|
ECON 211
Prin Of Macro
Introduces macroeconomics, national income analysis, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation, unemployment, and international finance. Note: ECON 211 and 212 may be taken in either sequence. Each semester. Fall, annually at Venango,.|
ECON 212
Prin Of Micro
Introduces microeconomics, consumer behavior and demand, organization of production, market structures, the pricing of inputs and outputs, and international trade. Note: ECON 211 and 212 may be taken in either sequence. Each semester.|
ECON 215
Prin Of Economics (Honors)
This course is an accelerated combination of Economics 211 and Economics 212. Topics covered are national income analysis, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation, unemployment, consumer behavior and demand, organization of produc,tion, market structures, the pricing of inputs and outputs, and international trade and payments.|
ECON 221
Econ-Bus Stat I
Covers descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, mathematical expectation, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals. Emphasizes application of these statistical techniques in the areas of business and economics. Prerequi,sites: College algebra or equivalent and sophomore standing. Each semester. Fall, annually at Venango.|
ECON 222
Econ-Bus Stat II
Covers hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis, non-parametric statistics, and time series and index numbers analysis. Emphasizes applications of these techniques in the area of business and economics. Introd,uces students to the use of a prewritten computer statistical estimation program. Prerequisite: ECON 221. Each semester.|
ECON 230
Econ & Bus Stats (Honors)
This course is an accelerated combination of Economics 221 and Economics 222. Topics covered are descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, mathematical expectation, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testi,ng, the analysis of variance and covariance, regression and correlation analysis, nonparametric statistics, and time series analysis. Applications of these techniques in the area of business and economics are emphasized. Statistical computer routin,es will be used. This course cannot be used to meet general education requirements.|
ECON 309
Managerial Economics
The application of microeconomic analysis to managerial decision-making in the global environment. Topics include decision-making under uncertainty, demand and demand estimation, production and cost theory, statistical estimation of production and c,ost functions, market structures, and pricing decisions. The course is designed for upper-division business administration students and utilizes tools covered in required lower-division prerequisite courses. Prerequisite: ECON 222.|
ECON 310
Interm Micro
Examines the behavior of consumers, producers, and the economic theory of production and output determination in commodity and resource markets. Prerequisite: ECON 212. Each semester.|
ECON 311
Interm Macro
Explores national income accounting and analysis, theories of consumption and investment expenditures, the role of money in a dynamic economy, economic growth, and public policy. Prerequisite: ECON 211. Fall, annually.|
ECON 312
Compara Econ Syst
Analyzes alternative patterns of economic control, planning, and market structure. Compares and evaluates experiences under capitalism, socialism, and mixed economics. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Spring, annually.|
ECON 314
Urban & Reg Econ
Introduces subnational economics. Includes elementary trade theory, location theory, systems of cities, land use changes, and the employment and income generating activities of cities. Emphasizes the economics of housing, transportation, poverty, dis,crimination, and public sector activity. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and ECON 212. Spring, biennially.|
ECON 323
App Of Bus & Econ Stats
Applies the statistical methods of probability, sampling, estimation, analysis of variance, regression, and correlation in the areas of economics and business. Prerequisite: ECON 222.|
ECON 342
Econ Of Governmt & Bus
Examines theoretical and empirical analysis of the effects of government policy on business behavior and economic efficiency in a market economy. Includes regulatory theory and policy; antitrust policy; social regulation of business and markets; and,international trade policy. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Spring, biennially.|
ECON 351
Labor Economics
Applies theory of the market to labor. Stresses the evolution of labor law, collective bargaining, labor unions, and government policy. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Fall, annually.|
ECON 361
Inter Econ Relat
Examines theory and practice of international trade. Considers balance of payments, foreign exchange, national commercial policies, international investment, and foreign aid. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Fall, annually.|
ECON 363
Economic Development
Surveys development models, development policies, and problems of development in developing countries. Identifies major economic questions relevant to less-developed economies and showing how economic analysis can be used to further understanding of,the obstacles to development and formulating appropriate policies. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and ECON 212. Spring, annually.|
ECON 370
Money And Banking
Explores nature and origins of money; the commercial banking system and money creation; central banking and the Federal Reserve System; monetary policy and domestic and international economic stability. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Spring, annual,ly.|
ECON 371
Public Finance
Analyzes public sector activity and its impact upon resource allocation and income distribution. Includes the theory of public expenditures, public choice, cost-benefit analysis, and fiscal federalism. Investigates the structure, incidence, and incen,tive effects of the personal income tax, corporate income tax, and various consumption and wealth taxes. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212. Fall, annually.|
ECON 450
Business Honors Seminar
This course is designed to give students a broad range of opportunities to enhance professional experience in their chosen field by developing a relevant service project, working with a business leader in a mentorship arrangement, or presenting resea,rch at a regional or national academic conference. A thesis derived from HON 350 (Junior Seminar) would also qualify if professionally presented. Each project must be approved by the director of the honors program and chairperson of the Economics D,epartment. Junior standing is required. Enrollment is restricted to students in one of the following: enrolled in the Honors Program or PHAROS program; have an overall QPA of 3.4 or higher; are in a post-baccalaureate status; or are enrolled in a g|
ECON 461
Int'l Fin Econ & Capital Mkts
An applied analysis of international economics and the behavior of multinational corporations, with a special emphasis on the economics of technology transfer. Topics include: theory of the firm; foreign direct investment; intellectual property righ,ts; market imperfections; international trade; international finance; economic development; and technology transfer. Prerequisite: ECON 361, or consent of the instructor. Spring, biennially.|
ECON 470
Bus Cycls And Frcstng
Explores theories of business fluctuations; applications of modern income theory to business cycles; examination of business cycle indicators and forecasting techniques. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 222, or consent of the instructor. Spring, annually.|
ECON 490
Hist Of Econ Thgt
Examines development of economic ideas from ancient times to the present. Emphasizes the period from Adam Smith onward. Considers the economic and political environment in which ideas emerged as well as the leading economists advancing or defending t,he ideas. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and 212 and senior standing. Spring, annually.|
ECON 491
Independent Study
Provides an opportunity to explore in depth a problem or area of economics, according to the student's interest, under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Prerequisites: 2.75 QPA and consent of both instructor and department chair. M,aximum credit granted in ECON 491 is six credits.|
ECON 492
Special Topics In Econ
Provides an opportunity for students to investigate specific topics or current issues. Prerequisites depend upon the subject to be covered.|
ECON 500
Prin of Economics (Honors)
This course is an accelerated combination of Economics 211 and Economics 212. Topics covered are national income analysis, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation, unemployment, consumer behavior and demand, organization of produc,tion, market structures, the pricing of inputs and outputs, and international trade.|
ECON 501
Principles of Macroeconomics
Introduces macroeconomics, national income analysis, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policies, inflation, unemployment, and international finance.|
ECON 502
Principles of Microeconomics
Introduces microeconomics, consumer behavior and demand, organization of production, market structures, the pricing of inputs and outputs, and international trade.|
ECON 503
Econ & Bus Stats (Honors)
This course is an accelerated combination of Economics 221 and Economics 222. Topics covered are descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, mathematical expectation, sampling distributions, confidence intervals, hypothesis testi,ng, the analysis of variance and covariance, regression and correlation analysis, nonparametric statistics, and time series analysis. Applications of these techniques in the area of business and economics are emphasized. Statistical computer routin,es will be used. This course cannot be used to meet general education requirements.|
ECON 504
Econ & Business Stats I
Covers descriptive statistics, probability, probability distributions, mathematical expectation, sampling distributions, and confidence intervals. Emphasizes application of these statistical techniques in the areas of business and economics. Prereq,uisites: College algebra or equivalent.|
ECON 505
Econ & Business Stats II
Covers hypothesis testing, the analysis of variance, regression and correlation analysis, non-parametric statistics, and time series and index numbers analysis. Emphasizes applications of these techniques in the area of business and economics. Intr,oduces students to the use of a prewritten computer statistical estimation program. Prerequisite: ECON 221 or ECON 504.|
ECON 510
Adv Managerial Econ
This course will focus on the development and practical application of theoretical and quantitative techniques to business decision-making, including international applications. Optimization techniques draw on the student?s knowledge of economics, ma,thematics, and statistics through modeling and the use of computer statistical packages. Prerequisite: Microeconomics foundation course, ECON 222, MATH 232.|
ECON 570
Econ & Bus Forecasting
An advanced study of forecasting techniques and business conditions analysis. Topics include: economic indicator analysis, classical time series components, econometric forecasting techniques, exponential smoothing models, and ARIMA models. Emphasis,is placed on model development and evaluation using pre-written computer forecasting routines. Prerequisites: ECON 222 and macroeconomics foundation course.|
ECON 600
Independent Study
An opportunity for the graduate student to investigate in depth a facet of economics not covered by course offerings. The topic of study and course requirements must be approved by the Department of Economics chair, and the work must be supervised by, a faculty member. Prerequisites: ECON 603, ECON 510 or ECON 611, and other requirements as deemed appropriate by the faculty supervisor.|
ECON 611
Adv Micro Econ An
An advanced study of the logical and mathematical development of microeconomic theories and the application of economic models to business problems. Major areas of study include demand theory, market models, welfare economics, and general equilibrium, analysis. Prerequisite: Microeconomics foundation course.|
ECON 612
Advanced Macroeconomics
An advanced study and analytical development of macroeconomic theory. Major areas include national income accounts, aggregate income determination models, monetary aggregates, and macro dynamics. Prerequisite: Macroeconomics foundation course.|
ECON 699
Special Topics
An opportunity for students to investigate specific topics or current issues on the graduate level. Prerequisites depend on the subject to be covered.|
ED 110
Ed Found For Middle & High Sch
Familiarizes teacher candidates with middle/senior high schools by emphasizing the role, philosophy, and organization of middle/senior high schools in today's diverse society. Covers historical, philosophical, psychological, and sociological perspect,ives by examining major concepts, principles, theories, and research of developmentally responsive middle/senior high programs and schools; examines middle/senior high school governance, finance, teachers' legal, ethical and professional rights and r,esponsibilities; highlights effective teaching practices and integrative curriculum at the middle/senior high levels; explores current issues in American education. Classroom field observations and explorations in a middle/senior high school, requir|
ED 121
Human Develop & Learn
Acquisition of understanding and appreciation of the cognitive, social-emotional, ecological-systems, and physical-motor dimensions of human growth and changes (birth through adolescence). Emphasizes cultural influences on human growth and change wit,h respect to cognition, learning theories, individual differences, personality, growth, abilities, and interests. Explores cross-cultural and multiethnic perspectives with respect to holistic development of children and adolescents; involvement with,and observation of individuals at various levels of development. Each semester.|
ED 122
Educational Psychology
Examines pre-adolescent and adolescent development, learning theories, and education environments in a multicultural society from the perspective of educational psychology. Emphasizes learning theory and adolescent characteristics, including develop,ment and motivation as they impact teacher decision-making in the middle and high school levels of learning. Special attention paid to critical thinking and experiential processes to engage students in a critical constructivist process. Prerequisit,e: ED 110; Clearances required for school observations.|
ED 200
Reading Seminar
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ED 217
Micro Applic In Classrm
Introduces pre-service educators (K-12) to microcomputer technology and prepares them to use microcomputers as tools in their classroom. While acquiring computer skills, students explore, use, and demonstrate competence in each of the following areas,: word processing, databases, spreadsheets, multimedia/hypermedia, CD-ROM, desktop publishing, software applications, instructional design, telecommunications, and major issues associated with the use of technology in education. Course complements st,udents' specific areas of expertise.|
ED 225
Multicultural Education
Provides prospective teachers with a comprehensive understanding of the complexity of ethnic diversity and pluralism in the United States, and explores pluralism from a global perspective. Analyzes the goals, rationale, meaning, assumptions, and nece,ssary school conditions for effective teaching and learning in multicultural multi-ethnic schools, fostering multicultural competencies and preparing prospective teachers for multicultural multi-ethnic classrooms. Emphasizes interpersonal and pedagog,ical skills needed for success of teacher and learner.|
ED 227
Classroom Management
Prepares pre-service professional educators to organize and manage instructional environments through a variety of instructional formats and classroom organizational methods, as well as teacher leadership roles. Provides competencies necessary to pla,n positive instructional activities, organize classroom space and time, direct the acquisition of knowledge and appropriate social behavior, and apply a range of classroom control techniques. Requires participation experiences in the schools.|
ED 300
Secondary Ed Block
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ED 327
Inst Strat & Mgmt Sec & K-12
Explores basic skills of planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating the teaching-learning and management process through a clinical approach to teaching. Focuses on teacher effectiveness research and its application to instructional strategies, and materials, classroom and behavior management, and educational technology. Includes peer teaching and simulations as integral components of the course. Incorporates variety of instructional strategies: lecture, discussion groups, simulations, pee,r teaching, and group and individual analysis peer teaching experiences. Prerequisite: ED 121 or 122.|
ED 328
Meth Teaching & Eval Lang Art
Prepares aspiring secondary school teachers in the methods of teaching such language-based subjects as speech, composition, literature, grammar, and reading, as well as media use. Observations and teaching experiences in area schools are included.,Prerequisite: ED 327.|
ED 329
Educational Assessment
Examines construction, selection, administration, interpretation, and utilization of evaluation techniques and instruments, including statistical interpretations. Emphasizes analysis of standardized tests applicable to various content areas, as well,as the construction and utilization of qualitative assessment techniques. Taken concurrently with the methods courses (block) for secondary education majors. Taken prior to the methods courses (block) for elementary education majors. Prerequisite: ED, 327 and admission to Certification Program. Each semester.|
ED 332
Meth Of Teaching Sec Science
Prepares biology, chemistry, earth science, general sscience and physics teachers for the secondary schools. Emphasizes formulating objectives, selecting and organizing content, developing skill in using a variety of teaching strategies, and evaluati,ng pupil progress. Stresses the investigatory approach to teaching biology in laboratory, field, and simulated teaching experiences. Includes observations and teaching experiences in area schools. Prerequisite: ED 327. Each semester.|
ED 333
Tchng Reading-Sec
Examines techniques for helping secondary students develop reading skills needed to comprehend content-area textbooks. Students will examine those skills in their certification area. Applies skills and competencies developed in ED 225: MULTICULTURAL,EDUCATION. Required course for secondary education majors. Requires participation experiences in the schools. Prerequisite: ED 327.|
ED 334
Meth Tch Physical Sci
Explores modern concepts of chemistry, physics, and general science teaching and evaluating, emphasizing a laboratory-oriented approach. Presents the philosophy, laboratory techniques, curriculum testing, and extracurricular aspects of secondary scho,ol chemistry, physics, and general science teaching. Prerequisite: For secondary chemistry majors--1 in chemistry; for physics majors--10 s.h. in physics. Includes observations and teaching experiences in area schools. Prerequisite: ED 327. Fall, ann,ually.|
ED 335
Meth Tch Ph-Math
Designed for students seeking certification in both physics and mathematics. Contains the modern methods of teaching and evaluating in both these disciplines, as described in the courses listed as ED 334 and 339. Students divide their time between th,ese two methods courses according to schedule presented in consultation with the instructors in these courses. Includes observations and teaching experiences in area schools. Prerequisite: ED 327. Fall, annually.|
ED 337
Meth Tch & Eval Soc Stu
Coordinates knowledge of the social science disciplines with various teaching strategies appropriate for instruction at the junior and senior high school levels. Provides a historical perspective, examination of current research, curriculum programs,and trends, and methods and materials applicable to unit type social studies teaching in a pluralistic society. Emphasizes the development, selection, management, and evaluation of materials and experiences that foster concept development, inquiry an,d critical thinking in social studies. Considers addressing the needs of diverse student populations, integrating social studies with other current areas, addressing national and state standards, and the applications of technology. Prerequisite: ED 3|
ED 339
Meth Tch & Eval Math
Explores place and function of mathematics in secondary education, content improvement and evaluation of instruction in mathematics, acquaintance with current literature and research, and observation in secondary schools. Includes observations and te,aching experiences in area schools. Prerequisites: ED 327 and nine hours of college mathematics. Fall, annually.|
ED 350
Tch English Lang Learners
Introduces participants to background, methods, and strategies needed to effectively teach English Language Learners. Includes research and theory of second language acquisition, bilingualism, the difference between social and academic proficiency,,and the roles that culture and language play in learning. Explores importance of native language support in achieving academic success and teacher's role in building a safe classroom where diversity of languages and cultures and welcomed and encoura,ged. Investigates culturally diverse students' values expressed through beliefs and behaviors. Requires active participation through class discussion, opportunities for practice-teaching, evaluation and development of materials and instructional pl|
ED 401
Meth Envron Ed
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ED 402
Creative Response To Conflict
A study of the current research in the development of a classroom environment which fosters cooperation, communication, affirmation, and problem-solving for children as well as for teachers, staff, instructional teams, parents, support personnel, and, other adults. Emphasizes human capabilities for resolving conflicts at various life stages and situations. Examines a range of discipline models as their implementation relates to the classroom environment. (Designed to be taken in conjunction with,student teaching in the undergraduate program, or as an elective in the master's program.) Prerequisite ED 121 or 122 for undergraduate credit. Summer only, on demand..|
ED 403
Field Exp & Meth Envr Ed
Focuses on methods used to teach environmental knowledge, concepts, and concerns, including the history and research in environmental education. Examines the relationship of all curriculum areas to environmental education. May be taken for graduate c,redit with the approval of the Education Department chair and the instructor. McKeever Center in Sandy Lake, PA, will be a site for this course. Offered for two weeks at a time during Summer Presession.|
ED 406
Gender Issues In Ed
Examines the ways in which schools perpetuate gender bias and how educational institutions, as a reflection of the patriarchal society in which they coexist, provide different experiences and outcomes for female and male students and teachers. Prereq,uisite: ED 110 or WS 100 for WS 406 or permission of instructor.|
ED 409
Fld Based Multicul Ed: Obs Urb
Provides opportunities for pre-service teachers, both elementary and secondary education majors, and both undergraduate and graduate students, to interact with teachers and students in urban public schools whose backgrounds are different from their o,wn. Analysis the goals, rationale, meaning, assumptions, and necessary school conditions for effective teaching and learning in multicultural/multi-ethnic, urban schools, fostering multicultural competencies and preparing prospective teachers for mul,ticultural/multi-ethnic, urban classrooms. Emphasizes interpersonal and pedagogical skills needed for success of teachers and learners in urban schools. Includes community service in neighborhoods near the host school. Prerequisite: ED 110, 121 or 12|
ED 414
Literacy Training
Enables student volunteers to teach in literacy programs aimed at adult and secondary school learners in different settings. Integrates basic methods for instruction in vocabulary, comprehensive study skills, and writing with the aim of fostering an,appreciation for reading. Open to all university students regardless of major. Prerequisites: 2.50 QPA minimum, sophomore or above standing, and consent of instructor.|
ED 417
Tech Integration ML & HS Educ
This course is designed to facilitate future middle level and high school educators with the knowledge, skills, and dispositions for integrating technology into their classroom instruction and for using technology to improve professional productivity,. Students will explore the relationship between ISTE and those PA Academic Standards related to middle level and high school learners. These concepts will be applied to the development of instructional materials that can be used for assessing lear,ning and promoting achievement for all students in the middle and high school grades. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the COEHS certification program.|
ED 420
Ind Interven For Stu Tch
Professional development program of intervention designed for students who require individualized experiences to successfully demonstrate professional knowledge and competencies in school and agency settings. Implementing an Individualized Interventi,on Plan (IIP) prepares students for successful field experiences and enables them to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes needed to become successful classroom practitioners. Does not fulfill the student teaching requirement. Prerequisites: R,ecommendation of director of field services, university student teaching supervisor, Elementary/Secondary Block Committee, and/or Education Department chair. Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards|
ED 421
Modern Lang Student Tch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in elementary and secondary school settings. After an orientation to the school setting, the student teaches under t,he direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments will offer diversity in grade levels K-12, ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating prof,essionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA,|
ED 423
Libr Pract In Sec Sch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in library settings in secondary schools. After an orientation to the school and library, the student participates i,n management, technical services, literary enrichment, and instructional activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor.|
ED 424
Sec Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in library settings in secondary schools. After an orientation to the school and library, students participate in ma,nagement, technical services, literary enrichment, and instructional activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels, ability levels of pupils, content area,s, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional|
ED 425
Sec Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in library settings in secondary schools. After an orientation to the school and library, students participate in ma,nagement, technical services, literary enrichment, and instructional activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels, ability levels of pupils, content area,s, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional|
ED 426
Environ Ed Student Tch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in an environmental education setting. After an orientation to the environmental education setting, the student will, teach under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments will offer diversity in grade levels, ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or coopera,ting professionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulati|
ED 432
Student Tch In Music Ed
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in music settings in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. After an orientation to the school and music setting,s, students teach classes and participate in choral and instrumental music activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels K-12, ability levels of pupils, c,ontent areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in college, completion of all required profe|
ED 433
Student Tch In Music Ed
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in music settings in elementary, middle, and secondary schools. After an orientation to the school and music setting,s, students teach classes and participate in choral and instrumental music activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity in grade levels K-12, ability levels of pupils, c,ontent areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Completion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in college, completion of all required profe|
ED 434
Workshop
Provides opportunities for in-service teachers to encounter new ideas, knowledge, and methods in meeting problems in today's schools. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in the elementary or secondary schools.|
ED 439
Sec Lang Acq & Mtd Tch Wrld Lg
Examination of the physiological and linguistic foundations of modern language acquisition. Techniques of teaching and evaluating modern languages and cultures. Analysis of recent research in the area of second language acquisition with a focus on t,he integration of the National Standards for Foreign Language Education.|
ED 450
Independent Study
Provides students with opportunity to explore an area of special need or interest in education in-depth, under the supervision of a member of the department. Students develop a proposed study plan and secure the approval of the proposed director and,department chair before registration. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.|
ED 490
Prof Sem In Social Studies
Examines problems, practices, regulations, and other information relevant to social studies majors during their student teaching semester. Using a constructivist approach, students will reflect on and apply: federal and state law relevant to the work, of student teachers and beginning teachers, student teaching objectives and educational objectives of student teaching centers, professional ethics, function of professional organizations, Praxis preparation, classroom management and conflict resolu,tions strategies. Prerequisite: Secondary block. Each semester.|
ED 495
Student Tch Prof Prac
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ED 499
Special Topics
Examines current topics and issues in education. Topics, announced in advance, focus on the needs and interests of educators.|
ED 501
Sem In Critical Ed Issue
This course examines the current critical educational issues with special emphasis on school funding, legal issues, gender equity, curriculum and cultural issues, and school reform.|
ED 502
Creative Response To Conflict
A study of the current research in the development of a classroom environment which fosters cooperation, communication, affirmation, and problem-solving for children as well as for teachers, staff, instructional teams, parents, support personnel, and, other adults. Emphasizes human capabilities for resolving conflicts at various life stages and situations. Examines a range of discipline models as their implementation relates to the classroom environment. (Designed to be taken in conjunction with,student teaching in the undergraduate program, or as an elective in the master?s program.) Elective course in either the undergraduate or graduate program. Prerequisite: ED 121 or 122 for undergraduate credit. Summer session only, on demand.|
ED 505
Tch Content To Eng Lang Learn
Introduces participants to background, methods, and strategies needed to effectivley teach content to English language learners. Explores importance of native support in achieving academic success and teacher's role in building a safe classromm wher,e diversity of languages and cultures are welcomed and encouraged. Requires active participation through class discussion, evaluation and development of materials and instructional plans. Prerequisite: ED 524 or equivalent|
ED 506
Gender Issues In Ed
Examines the ways in which schools perpetuate gender bias and how educational institutions, as a reflection of the patriarchal society in which they exist, provide different experiences and outcomes for female and male students and teachers. Prerequi,site: ED 110 or WS 100 or consent of instructor.|
ED 509
Fld Based Multicul Ed: Obs Urb
Provides opportunities for pre-service teachers, both elementary and secondary education majors, and both undergraduate and graduate students, to observe and participate in urban classrooms. Students travel in university vehicles to visit schools in,major urban areas and spend a minimum of five consecutive days participating in urban classrooms. Prerequisite: junior-level standing or consent of instructor. Offered each year during Summer Pre-session, on demand.|
ED 517
Educational Comp Applica
This course is designed to provide in-service educators (K-12) who have had little or no computer experience with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to use microcomputers as instructional tools in their classrooms. While acquiring compute,r skills, students will explore, use, and demonstrate competence in each of the following areas: word processing, databases, spreadsheets, graphics, multimedia, instructional design, telecommunications, and major issues associated with the use of tec,hnology in education. This course will provide in-service teachers with the knowledge base to make appropriate decisions regarding the use of technology in their respective classrooms. Not available to students who have taken ED 217 since summer 1994|
ED 518
Teaching Secondary Lang Arts
Prepares Language Arts candidates in methods appropriate for secondary school teaching. Emphasizes constructivist approaches to teaching, reading, writing, speaking, listening, viewing, and thinking. Incorporates planning, curriculum development, a,ssessment, and evaluation in specifically language arts environments. Includes observations and teaching experiences in schools. Prerequisite: ED 524|
ED 520
Intro To Research
This seminar course covers the selection, investigation, and writing of a research topic. Students are introduced to the planning of research projects, major methods of obtaining data, descriptive statistics, statistical inferences, methods of analys,is and critical evaluation of published research, and the preparation of written reports. Proposed research problems and procedures are prepared for discussion and critical analysis. Offered Each semester and summer.|
ED 521
Inst Leadership Skills
This course involves a survey of various theories, models, and styles of leadership, followed by the application of leadership skills in teacher-pupil and teacher-colleague relationships.|
ED 522
Analysis Of Teaching
This course presents an analysis of various teaching models and instructional designs. Videotaped lessons and clinical/field experiences applying course competencies will be critiqued by faculty and peers. Offered fall semester only.|
ED 523
Curr Develop & Eval
Presents philosophic, psychological, and social foundations of the school curriculum as well as principles of curriculum development, curriculum design, curriculum implementation, and curriculum evaluation with an emphasis on K-12 models. A range of, views both historical and current is presented along with curriculum issues, trends and future directions. Ideologic biases from traditional to pragmatic and postmodern are considered across major time frames for the 20th century and early 21st cen,tury. Offered spring semester only.|
ED 524
Foundations In Education
By exploring the social realities and challenges confronting today's diverse classrooms and the teaching profession, this course introduces pre-service teacher candidates to the foundations of education through an examination of the historical, philo,sophical, and social context of American education as well as the cognitive, psychological, and social-emotional perspectives of the classroom in a multicultural society. By exploring the actuality of career commitment to the teaching profession, th,is course prepares pre-service teacher candidates for their role in today's diverse classrooms with the essential knowledge, skills, and disposition necessary to become reflective practitioners.|
ED 526
Sociology Of Ed
This course is an analysis of the public school as an institution in modern societies and its operation in complex social structures. The course draws upon the science of sociology and other social fields to explain the operation of the school as one, of the social systems which operate to influence the development of people in becoming efficient and cooperative members of society.|
ED 527
Statistics In Ed
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ED 528
Philosophy Of Ed
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ED 529
Foundations of Curriculum
The course provides a distinct overview of the current and historical curricular evolution with an emphasis on philosophical and sociological foundations, student, school, and community needs, the foundational and present standards movement, and prin,ciples of curriculum and curricular issues. Students will explore these areas through an inquiry approach framed with the course's essential questions.|
ED 530
Connect Stand, Inst & Assess
Designed to provide educators with a brief review of the purpose and process of assessment and to introduce them to design options available in designing and implementing authentic assessment. Students acquire, synthesize, interpret and discuss a ran,ge of topics dealing with assessment in the educational process. Emphasizes a backward design process for curriculum development that links standards, curriculum, instruction, and embedded assessment. Students construct and evaluate a variety of asse,ssment tools with a particular emphasis on authentic assessment. Every other year and/or as needed.|
ED 531
Tch Sec Social Studies
Prepares social studies candidates for teaching diverse learners in a secondary setting through field-based experiences; emphasizes critical pedagogical methods, strategies, and researched-based best practices to make social studies content comprehen,sive to secondary students; expands on models of differentiated instructional design, effective interdisciplinary planning, and technology integration to teach content; builds a repertoire of teaching strategies to enhance students' diverse learning,in the secondary classroom; emphasizes NCSS essential skills for social studies and disciplinary standards for history, geography, civics, government, economics, and behavioral sciences. Prerequisite: Completion of the five required courses in Post|
ED 532
Tch Sec Science For Understand
Prepares post-baccalaureate candidates to teach the sciences in secondary schools. Emphasizes teaching science for understanding and application of science knowledge. Includes basic curriculum design-formulating goals and objectives, selecting and,organizing content, developing skill in using a variety of teaching strategies, and evaluating pupil progress. Stresses the inquiry approach to teaching science. Includes observations and teaching experiences in schools. Prerequisite: ED 534, SPED, 418. Fall/Spring, as needed.|
ED 533
Rec Dev Ed So Stud
Students explore recent trends in promoting learning in the social studies as well as study current problems involved. Social forces at work today and their effect on curriculum development are considered.|
ED 534
Workshop
Provides opportunities for in-service teachers to encounter new ideas, knowledge, and methods in meeting problems in today?s schools. Prerequisite: Teaching experience in the elementary or secondary schools.|
ED 537
Strat-Probs Tch Ele Math
This course deals with recent trends and methods of teaching mathematical concepts and skills appropriate to the elementary grade level. Particular attention is given to diagnostic procedures and to a ?hands-on? laboratory approach. Classes are condu,cted in a well-equipped elementary mathematics laboratory. Recent research which applies to the teaching and learning of mathematical skills and concepts is considered.|
ED 539
Sec Lang Acq & Mtd Tch Wrld Lg
Examination of the physiological and linguistic foundations of modern language acquisition. Techniques of teaching and evaluating modern languages and cultures. Analysis of recent research in the area of second language acquisition with a focus on,the integration of the National Standards for Foreign Language Education.|
ED 540
Prin Of Inst Design & Ed Tech
This course focuses on systematic procedures for designing, developing, evaluating and revising instruction to meet identified goals and objectives for promoting educational technology. Instructional design theories and applications will be examined,. The appropriateness and production of both projected and non-projected multimedia will be explored in the production of instructional solutions for the targeted audience including the K-12 community and other training and development learning envi,ronments. Fall, annually.|
ED 544
Classrm Assessmt For Learning
Assessment is an essential part of the learning triangle. Curriculum, instruction, and assessment are core elements in the learning process and are inextricably linked. In this course, students will actively review the basic concepts of data-driven, assessment for learning, develop and share assessment strategies that are used to make instructional decisions in support of the standards and student learning in general. The course is designed to support learners as they explore the development o,f assessment strategies and reporting systems as well as assessment before, during, and after instruction.|
ED 554
Graduate Certificati Practicum
A professional practicum that requires the application and integration of instruction, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in a Pre K-12 setting. Certification candidates participate in a teacher practicum in their certification,area under the direction of a classroom cooperating mentor teacher and a university supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of the required courses in the Graduate Level Certification Program with a minimum grade of B, a cumulative 3.0 QPA, and satisfa,ctory standing in admission and retention standards in the college. On demand.|
ED 558
Internship Seminar
Supports teaching interns in the classroom with discussions of classroom management problems and strategies, and organization as a path to fewer management issues. Includes teacher effectiveness research and its application to instructional strategi,es and materials, classroom and behavior management as well as inclusion strategies for students with special needs. Web-based asynchronous seminar concurrent with student teaching internship. Corequisite: ED 554. Each semester.|
ED 559
Special Topics
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ED 563
Reading Pedagogy
Students will define and investigate reading as related to the individual learner. Study is made of the current research into sequential and systematic reading development and the application of multi-dimensional techniques, strategies, and materials, in the teaching of reading K-12 for both narrative and expository structures. Prerequisite: teaching certification. Annually.|
ED 564
Evidenced-Based Literacy Inst
Students will review the major national studies in literacy since the 1960's and investigate current research on various literacy topics for the purpose of developing a model of best practice based on inquiry and reflection. Fall, annually.|
ED 565
Read & Lang Arts In Ech
Study and observation of the child's early reading behavior during early childhood and observation of other aspects of language arts; exercises for listening experiences and developing writing skills; assessment of some of the causes of difficulties,in learning to read and to use language effectively.|
ED 567
Sec,Coll Content Rea Read Ins
Survey of reading programs and principles at secondary and post-secondary levels; examination of materials and strategies for various instructional settings and populations with an emphasis on secondary content area reading. Fall, annually.|
ED 568
Language and Literacy
This course is a study of literacy acquisition which includes consideration of developmental and sociocultural factors. The course examines instructional practices which utilize children's literature in teaching the language arts. Writing is emphasiz,ed. Prerequisite: Teaching Certification. As needed.|
ED 569
Assessment Of Literacy
Provides an in-depth analysis of assessment strategies and techniques in the field of literacy. Features of this course include evaluating, implementing, and analyzing data gathered from formal and informal assessment approaches for the purpose of pl,anning instruction. Introduction to literacy profile. Prerequisites: Two graduate level literacy courses. Spring, annually.|
ED 570
Practicum I: Assessment
Emphasizes the development of competency in the assessment process of addressing reading difficulties. Includes (1) selection of appropriate diagnostic, formative, and summative assessments, (2) developing facility in using the assessment and standa,rds resources of the Pennsylvania Standards-Aligned System, (3) administering appropriate and purposeful assessments, (4) developing a sensitive interpretation of assessment results, and (5) reporting data, interpretations, and recommendations to sta,keholders in a comprehensive, professional manner. Prerequisite: ED 569 and permission of the instructor. Course must be taken concurrently with ED 571. Summer, annually.|
ED 571
Practicum II: Instruction
Emphasizes the development of competency in the instructional process of addressing reading difficulties. Includes (1) planning standards-based, assessment-informed instructional opportunities using the Pennsylvania Standards Aligned System resource,s, (2) employing techniques for effective, evidence-based instruction, (3) implementing effective teaching of individual strategies which will enable learners to develop as readers, (4) developing expertise in using materials related to the immediate, needs of individuals, and (5) preparing a leteracy profile which suggests to stakeholders procedures and resources to enhance a student's literacy development. Prerequisites: ED 569 and permission of the instructor. Course must be taken concurrentl|
ED 574
Lit Lead Colb Cch Coll Pro Dev
The organization, administration, and supervision of reading programs from kindergarten through high school. Particular emphasis is given to the functions of a reading specialist and literacy coaches in the development of a curriculum guide for readi,ng, organizational patterns in reading programs, and procedures for instituting and operating in-service reading education programs. Prerequisites: Two graduate level literacy courses. Spring, annually.|
ED 575
Sem In Children's Lit
This seminar is an intensive study of various genres of children?s literature, with emphasis upon correlating into study units books that appeal to the interests of boys and girls. A study of storytelling techniques and other literature sharing metho,ds are included. Prerequisite: ELED 331 or LS 358.|
ED 576
Adv Sem In Reading & Lit
The study and evaluation of research and current reports on reading education issues. Prerequisite: ED 560.|
ED 578
Professional Seminar
Intended to be the capstone course for all graduate students in the MED program. Provides students with an opportunity to focus on an educationally relevant action research project as an integrating element for knowledge and experiences acquired dur,ing their graduate programs. Recognizes the validity of classroom-based inquiry and research as the basis for enhancing teaching and learning. Develops proficiency in using inquiry and reflection strategies to assist students in making instructiona,l decisions and process changes. Affords students the opportunity to share effective classroom practices and requires study and practice in interpreting and analyzing pertinent research to promote professional growth. Encourages students to view th|
ED 599
Special Topics
Examines current topics and issues in education. Topics, announced in advance, focus on the needs and interests of educators.|
ED 600
Research
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ED 610
Mobile Educational Technology
A web-based course that introduces K-12 Professionals and/or Technology Specialist Certificate candidates to the potentials of mobile devices and applications, and assists them in using these multi-faceted resources as effective teaching and professi,onal development tools. Participants will be introduced to mobile educational technology related to communications, productivity, learning, presentations and integration. Within this framework, participants will create their own personal learning net,works, mobile technology resources, online presentations and design instructional lessons appropriate to their discipline demonstrating the integration of mobile educational technology throughout the K-12 setting.|
ED 617
Adv Educational Tech
Advanced course for graduate students who have a background in computers or who have taken ED 217 or ED 517 at Clarion University. Focuses on the development of knowledge and skills in: hardware/software maintenance; instructional design; educational, electronic networking; sophisticated applications of integrated software; and educational applications of multimedia, including interactive video CD-ROM, sound, text, and graphics. Prepares teachers to make appropriate decisions regarding the use of, technology in their classrooms/schools. Admission by permission of instructor. On demand.|
ED 620
Internet Applic K-12 Edu
Introduces K-12 Educators and/or Technology Specialist Certificate candidates to the potentials of the Internet and assist them in using this multi-faceted resource as an effective teaching tool within the classroom. Participants will be introduced,to the history, structure, and overall capabilities of the Internet, including Electronic Mail, Telnet, File Transfer Protocol (FTP), World Wide Web, and web-based distance education. Within this framework, participants will create their own web pag,es, design on-line instructional lessons appropriate to their discipline, and demoonstrate the integration of Internet/Technology information throughout the K-12 curriculum. Prerequisite: None. Annually.|
ED 649
Ed Tech Leadership
Involves a survey or various theories, models, and styles of leadership, followed by the application of leadership skills in teacher-pupil, teacher-colleague, teacher-administrator relationships and how those relationships are affected by the use of,technology in schools and how technology, in turn, impacts these roles. Summer, annually.|
ED 701
Master's Thesis
Provides graduate students enrolled in M.Ed. Programs with an elective course to focus on writing a professional research report in the student's field of study under the supervision of a graduate faculty member in the department. Upon completion, t,he thesis is presented to all members of the student's thesis committee. Both qualitative and quantitative investigations may be completed as a thesis. Thesis option may be taken in lieu of the comprehensive examination and, therefore, may be used,in partial fulfillment for the Master of Education degree. Students must complete applications for independent study with their advisor before registering for ED 701.|
ED 710
Ed Funct/Super
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ED 711
Admin Funct Super
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ED 712
Curr Design & Dev
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ED 735
Internship in Education
Provides an advanced professional experience in an educational setting where the student can gain hands-on experience working with practitioners under the guidance of certified education specialists in a school, district, or intermediate unit. Stude,nts will be able to apply the theories, knowledge, and skills in their coursework to an actual work environment. Students work with their advisor and graduate coordinator to locate an internship placement that best meets their needs. Prerequisite(s,): 18 credits of successfully completed coursework including ED 520; permission of the instructor and field supervisor.|
ED 750
Intrnship Sup E Ed
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EDAD 710
Leadership & The Adm Process
This course is designed to provide an introduction to the theory and practice of educational administration. The course is concerned with the competencies for managing and leading effective schools and increasing individual and group productivity. Th,eories and research findings that guide sound leadership practice will be uncovered. This course has been designed as the first course in the Principal Certification Program taken by the prospective school administrator. (Theme1)|
EDAD 711
Found, Sch Reform & Align Curr
This course is designed to provide the principal candidate with an examination of the curricular issues facing school administrators. Topics covered include but are not limited to: curriculum theory and practice, school reform/standards movement, cur,riculum mapping and assessment, and the curriculum adoption process. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme 1.|
EDAD 712
Instruct Superv For The School
This is the second course in Theme II (Curriculum Issues) of the principal certification program. This course is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of the instructional supervision issues facing school administrators. Topics covere,d may include, but are not limited to: principal as instructional leader, brain theory, multiple intelligences, mastery teaching, teacher expectation theory, and models of supervision. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme I.|
EDAD 713
School Facilities & Plant Oper
This is the first course in Theme III (School Management) of the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the principal candidate with an examination of the physical building issues facing school administrators. Topics covered inclu,de: transportation, managing renovation and construction, food service operation, and custodial operations. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme II.|
EDAD 714
School Finance
This is the second course in Theme III (School Management) of the principal certification program. Candidates will obtain theoretical and practical information about the basic principles of school finance, accounting procedures, and school business m,anagement. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme II.|
EDAD 715
Admin Ethic And School Law
This course represents the fourth theme (Administrative Ethics and School Law) in the principal certification program. This course is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of the legal and ethical issues facing school administrators.,Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme III.|
EDAD 717
Practicum In School Admin I
This course provides the candidate an authentic experience during the first semester of the principal certification program. It will begin on the first day of the semester and continue until the last day of the semester unless extended by the candida,te, the university mentor, or the field mentor. Candidate will focus on areas of educational administration via their experience in the administrative assessment center. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Themes I through IV.|
EDAD 720
The Law And Special Education
This is the first course within the fifth theme of the principal certification program. (The first theme in semester 2.) This course is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of the legal issues and challenges of the special education,program facing school administrators today. Prerequisite: All first semester requirements. (Themes I thru IV)|
EDAD 721
Spec Ed Prog Admin & Eval
This is the second course in Theme V (Special Education) of the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of the administration and evaluation of the special education program including an overview o,f the special education audit process. Prerequisite: All semester one courses and requirements.|
EDAD 722
Personnel Select & Supervision
This is the first course in Theme VI (Human Resource Management) in the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the candidates with an introduction to personnel selection, supervision, and evaluation. Prerequisite: Successful compl,etion of Theme V.|
EDAD 723
Staff Development
This is the second course in Theme VI (Human Resource Management) in the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the candidate with concepts and strategies designed to plan and implement programs that will meet the needs of profess,ional educators having a broad range of experience and maturity with regard to their teaching pedagogy. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme V.|
EDAD 724
Mediating Conflict In Organiza
This is the third course in Theme VI (Human Resource Management) in the principal certification program. This course will help candidates to develop an understanding of the management of power and conflict in organizations. Attention will be given to, group process, consensus building, and group dynamics. Case studies and simulations will be used to foster skills in conflict resolution. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme V.|
EDAD 725
Oral & Writ Comm For Sch Admin
This is the first course in Theme VII (Community Relations) of the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of the issues related to working with the general public and various stakeholders within t,he school community. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Theme VI.|
EDAD 726
Dev Pos Relations w/ Stakehold
This is the second course in Theme VII (Community Relations) in the principal certification program. It is designed to provide the candidate with an examination of issues related to working with the public facing school administrators. Prerequisite:,Successful completion of Theme VI.|
EDAD 727
Practicum In Sch Admin II
This course provides the candidate an authentic experience during the second semester of the principal certification program. It will begin on the first day of the semester and will continue until the last day of the semester unless extended by the c,andidate, university mentor, or field mentor. Candidates will focus on areas of educational administration via their experience in the administrative assessment center. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Themes V through VII.|
EDML 322
Tch Of Elem Sci
Examines methods of presenting science in the elementary school. Provides experiences in learning process, scope and sequence of science concepts, methods of investigation, problem solving, laboratory skills, scientific attitudes, newer curricula, re,ading materials, observing and working with elementary school children, and developing, teaching, and evaluating lessons. Two hour lecture and two hours laboratory weekly. Each semester.|
EDML 324
Tch Elem & Middle Sch Math 4-8
Focuses on principles in teaching mathematics to children in the middle grades (4-8), mathematics processes in middle grades, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, and involving and assisting, parents and communities in understanding childhood development in mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 111, SPED 422, SPED 418. Must be taken with ELED 327, ELED 329, and ELED 332 as a part of the ELED pre-block.|
EDML 325
Meth Tch El & Mid Sc Soc Stdy
This course for teachers in grades 4-8 emphasizes the development, selection, management and evaluation of materials and experiences that foster concept development, inquiry and critical thinking in social studies. The course also addresses the need,s of diverse student populations, integration of content areas and application of technology. Prerequisite: ELED 327 and ELED 329.|
EDML 327
Inst Strat & Class Mgt Mid Lev
Explores basic skills of planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating the teaching-learning and management process at the Middle School level. Focuses on teacher effectiveness research and its application to instructional strategies, materials,, and classroom/behavioral management. Includes peer teaching and field observations as integral components of the course. Prerequisites: ED 122 and certification program admission.|
EDML 329
Educational Assessment
Examines construction, selection, administration, interpretation, and utilization of evaluation techniques and instruments, including statistical interpretations. Emphasizes analysis of standardized tests applicable to various content areas, as well, as the construction and utilization of qualitative assessment techniques. This is taken prior to the methods courses (block(s).|
EDML 332
Connect Lit & Literacy Mid Grd
Surveys appropriate lierature and a variety of expository and narrative texts, emphasizing development of a knowledge base for using meaningful, appropriate texts to enhance comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary development as well as a rich general, knowledge base. Focuses on the history and development of literature for children and adolescents, evaluation and selection criteria, literature representative of diverse cultures, the most recent areas of expansion in literature for the middle gra,des and its uses in developing content area knowledge and supporting literacy learning and development. Each semester.|
EDML 333
Content Area Reading Strat
Overview of current definitions and basic approaches in intermediate and middle grades literacy assessment and instruction. Familiarizes students with techniques, strategies, and materials used to provide literacy assessment and isntruction for inte,rmediate and middle grade levels.|
EDML 334
Integ Lang Arts Middle Grades
Reflects an integrated approach for teaching language arts throughout the middle grades. Irrors the constructivist approach to teaching. Bases teacing strategies on cognitive, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic theories of how individuals learn,to effectively communicate within a diverse society. Models standards-based strategies for teaching the six language arts across the middle gradew curriculum. Authentic assessment of both process and product is emphasized. Each semester.|
EDML 424
Middle Level Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school settings. After an orientation to the school setting, students teach under the direction of a cooperating,professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity to grade levels (K-3, 4-6), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Com,pletion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and meeting university re|
EDML 425
Middle Level Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school settings. After an orientation to the school setting, students teach under the direction of a cooperating,professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity to grade levels (K-3, 4-6), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Com,pletion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and meeting university re|
ELED 250
Integ Of Aesthetic Exp Elem
Explores and applies theory, methods, and strategies for integrating aesthetic experiences with appropriate and relevant academic curriculum. Focuses on visual and performing arts, and performance-based assessment practices appropriate for the elemen,tary classroom. Explores art media and materials related to aesthetic, critical, cultural, and historical experiences to achieve and understanding of the arts within the humanities. Required for elementary and elementary dual certification majors. Fi,eld experience component required. Prerequisites: ED 110 and 121. Each semester.|
ELED 300
Elementary Block
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ELED 323
Teaching Reading
Overview of definitions and basic approaches in elementary school reading instruction. Familiarizes students with techniques, strategies, and materials used to teach reading to preschool, elementary, and middle school children from a variety of cultu,ral backgrounds. Prerequisite: ED 121. Each semester.|
ELED 324
Tch Elem & Middle Sch Math 4-8
Focuses on principles in teaching mathematics to children in the middle grades (4-8), mathematics processes in middle grades, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Principles and Standards for School Mathematics, and involving and assisting, parents and communities in understanding childhood development in mathematics. Prerequisites: MATH 111, SPED 422, SPED 418. Must be taken with ELED 327, ELED 329, and ELED 332 as a part of the ELED pre-block.|
ELED 325
Meth Tch El & Mid Sch Soc Stdy
This course for teachers in grades 4-8 emphasizes the development, selection, management and evaluation of materials and experiences that foster concept development, inquiry and critical thinking in social studies. The course also addresses the need,s of diverse student populations, integration of content areas and application of technology. Prerequisite: ELED 327 and ELED 329.|
ELED 326
Read Prob Ele Sch
Explores best practice procedures as recommended by the International Reading Association in providing concepts and skills needed by the elementary classroom teacher to identify and teach students with reading problems. Emphasizes creating effective,reading/literacy lessons to meet individual needs of students and to communicate with parents and other professionals. Prerequisite: ELED 323. Each semester.|
ELED 327
Inst Strat & Mgt For El & Ech
Explores basic skills of planning, designing, implementing, and evaluating the teaching-learning and management process through a clinical approach to teaching. Focuses on teacher effectiveness research and its application to instructional strategie,s and materials, classroom and behavior management, and educational technology for the elementary and early childhood teacher. Includes peer teaching and simulations as integral components of the course. Incorporates variety of instructional strate,gies: lecture, discussion groups, simulations, peer teaching, and group and individual analysis peer teaching experiences.|
ELED 329
Ed Eval & Auth Asmt Elem & Ech
Examines construction, selection, administration, interpretation, and utilization of evaluation techniques and instruments, including statistical interpretations. Emphasizes analysis of standardized tests applicable to various content areas, as well, as the construction and utilization of qualitative assessment techniques. This is taken prior to the methods courses (block(s).|
ELED 330
Lang Arts In Elem Sch
Reflects an integrated approach for teaching language arts via an integrated curriculum. Mirrors the constructivist approach to teaching. Bases teaching strategies on cognitive, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic theories of how children learn-how, they learn language, in particular. Applies strategies through language modes of listening, speaking, reading, writing, and visual literacy. Assessment of the language arts modes focuses on performance, product, and process focused approaches. Prere,quisite: ED 327. Each semester.|
ELED 331
Children's Literature
Surveys children's literature emphasizing development of a knowledge base of the various genres in this discipline, including multi-ethnic. Focuses on the historical background, the development of literature for children, evaluation and selection cri,teria for various genres, and the most recent areas of expansion in children's literature. Applies knowledge base in the various content area methods courses. Each semester.|
ELED 332
Connect Lit & Literacy Mid Grd
Surveys appropriate lierature and a variety of expository and narrative texts, emphasizing development of a knowledge base for using meaningful, appropriate texts to enhance comprehension, fluency, and vocabulary development as well as a rich general, knowledge base. Focuses on the history and development of literature for children and adolescents, evaluation and selection criteria, literature representative of diverse cultures, the most recent areas of expansion in literature for the middle gra,des and its uses in developing content area knowledge and supporting literacy learning and development. Each semester.|
ELED 333
Content Literacy Middle Grades
Overview of current definitions and basic approaches in intermediate and middle grades literacy assessment and instruction. Familiarizes students with techniques, strategies, and materials used to provide literacy assessment and isntruction for inte,rmediate and middle grade levels.|
ELED 334
Integ Lang Arts Middle Grades
Reflects an integrated approach for teaching language arts throughout the middle grades. Irrors the constructivist approach to teaching. Bases teacing strategies on cognitive, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic theories of how individuals learn,to effectively communicate within a diverse society. Models standards-based strategies for teaching the six language arts across the middle gradew curriculum. Authentic assessment of both process and product is emphasized. Each semester.|
ELED 423
Libr Pract In Elem Sch
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in library settings in elementary schools. After an orientation to the school and library, the student participates,in management, technical services, literary enrichment, and instructional activities under the direction of a cooperating professional and university supervisor.|
ELED 424
Elem Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school settings. After an orientation to the school setting, students teach under the direction of a cooperating,professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity to grade levels (K-3, 4-6), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Com,pletion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and meeting university re|
ELED 425
Elem Student Teaching
Professional practicum requires integration and application of instructional, management, and professional knowledge and competencies in school settings. After an orientation to the school setting, students teach under the direction of a cooperating,professional and university supervisor. Two field assignments offer diversity to grade levels (K-3, 4-6), ability levels of pupils, content areas, school and community size, multicultural settings, and/or cooperating professionals. Prerequisites: Com,pletion of 90 semester hours, satisfactory standing in admission and retention standards in the college, completion of all required professional courses in certification area with a minimum grade of C, a cumulative 2.75 QPA, and meeting university re|
ENG 110
Writing I
Introduces students to the composing strategies of college writing through a gradual progression from expressive discourse toward explanatory discourse. When necessary, work is done in punctuation, grammar, and spelling. Each semester.|
ENG 111
College Writing
Emphasizes development of critical thinking through analytical and argumentative writing and introduces students to research writing. Each semester. (Credit for advanced placement English or satisfactory SAT verbal scores do not exempt students from,fulfilling the university writing requirement.) Students who have received credit for courses equivalent to ENG 111 must document such transfer credit on a checksheet from the Office of the Registrar. Unless exempt, all students must take ENG 111.|
ENG 115
Comp For Inter Students
Helps ESL writers to develop an understanding of the English grammar system, to discern the systematic patterns that exist in the language, to develop a vocabulary in order to express their ideas in English, and to recognize the rhetorical structure,of the language. Satisfies the requirement for ENG 111.|
ENG 130
Literary Experience
Provides a wide selection of literature to introduce the student to various literary genres. No prerequisite. Recommended for all students. Each semester.|
ENG 140
Drama As Lit
Introduces students to the structures and strategies playwrights use to create different experiences for their readers. Draws on a variety of plays to focus on how to read a dramatic text so as to perceive the special cues it uses to stimulate imagi,native engagement and how the text can be translated into theatrical performance. No prerequisites.|
ENG 160
Discovering Language
Introduces students to the world of language-how it works, how it's used, what it's made of, what it does, and the myriad ways that language shapes and affects our lives and experience of the world.|
ENG 198
Intro Eng Stdy: Rhet & Poet I
For English majors. Introduces students to reading, writing, and interpreting texts, and to different theoretical and critical approaches within English Studies. Students will learn and apply rhetorical theories and strategies for the analysis and,production of texts. Emphasis on research methods and writing within the discipline. Course fulfills General Education English 111 requirement (I.A.) for English majors.|
ENG 199
Intro To English Studies
Designed for and required of English majors. Provides intensive introduction to reading, discussing, and writing about literature. A small number of texts will be read, allowing for an introduction to different theoretical and critical approaches to, English studies. Students will apply various theories as they analyze texts. Students will use research techniques appropriate for English majors. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement. S,pring, annually.|
ENG 200
Comp & Lit
Stresses the writing of papers as a direct result of reading, analysis, discussion, and interpretation of a variety of literary types. Examines fiction, plays, essays, and poems from various cultural perspectives. Addresses research techniques and re,lated skills. Includes studies of women and minority writers. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement. Each semester.|
ENG 202
Beg Creat Writing
Introduces the techniques of creative writing in prose and poetry. Emphasizes writing practice for students and opportunities for guidance and critical examination of their work. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general ed,ucation writing requirement.|
ENG 207
Research Meth & Writing
Teaches how to conduct research and how to write a research paper. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement. Each semester.|
ENG 221
Lit Beg To 1800
Surveys English literature and its historic, intellectual, and cultural contexts beginning with Beowulf and extending through the works of such writers as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Pope, Swift, Dryden, and Johnson, and provides highlights of the,development of modern English. Fall, annually.|
ENG 222
Eng Lit 1800 To Present
Surveys English literature from circa 1800 and includes selected works of such major writers as the Wordsworths, Coleridge, the Shelleys, Keats, Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, Woolf, Joyce, Eliot, and Lessing. Spring, annually.|
ENG 225
Us Lit Beg To 1860
Surveys major periods and writers of American literature from its beginnings to 1860. Enables students to understand the continuities and discontinuities of American literature. Includes writings by traditional male and female authors, as well as m,inority authors. Instructors may use historical and/or thematic approaches. Fall, annually.|
ENG 226
Us Lit 1860 To Present
Surveys major periods and writers of American literature from 1860 to the present. Enables students to understand the continuities and discontinuities of American literature. Includes writings by traditional male and female authors, as well as minor,ity authors. Instructors may use historical and/or thematic approaches. Spring, annually.|
ENG 227
World Lit:Backgrd & Trad
Examines some of the world's most influential literature, providing an overview of literary history from antiquity into the 19th century. Considers Asian, Middle Eastern, and pre-colonial American literatures as well as works from the European tradi,tion. Fall, annually.|
ENG 228
Modern Contemp World Lit
Surveys international literature from the past 150 years, with a focus on the fiction, drama, and poetry of significant authors. Studies national literatures within their respective social, historical, and geographical contexts, with an effort to id,entify cross-cultural developments. Spring, annually.|
ENG 230
Intro Afri-Amer Lit
Provides insight into the African-American experience through the reading and discussion of the works of African-American writers who have made significant contributions to literature. Includes various genres: poetry, short fiction, drama, film, the, novel, autobiography. No prerequisite.|
ENG 231
Intro Asian-Amer Lit
Provides an overview of Asian-American literature, introducing students to representative authors from its various periods of development, emphasizing contemporary works in different genres. No prerequisite.|
ENG 232
Intro To Native Am Lit
This course features Native American folktales and narratives, literature and contemporary films in order to discuss the Native American experience in relation to and independent of Europeans. The course will involve plotting an American history tim,eline and mapping reservations, as well as featuring moments in Native American history in conjunction with the literature under examination. External American and African American authors will also be used to fully understand the value of Native Am,erican literature.|
ENG 241
Voices In Canadian Lit
Introduces major English-Canadian writers, presented in their cultural and historical contexts. Selected French-Canadian works in English supplement the core offerings. No prerequisite.|
ENG 242
Intro To Amer Folklore
Introduces the major genres of American folklore: legend, tale, folk belief, song and ballad, and material folk culture; and various folk groups in America: occupational, gender, ethnic, age, regional, and their traditions. Analyzes examples of Am,erican literature and American popular culture through an examination of their American folk elements. Provides students with fieldwork experiences and methods of analysis of oral, customary, and material traditions. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
ENG 243
English Bible As Lit
This course offers a literary, historical and folkloric approach to the Bible in English. We will read much of the Bible, using a modern English translation of the King James version. We will place these readings in their literary, cultural, histor,ical and geographical contexts, approaching the Bible as an anthology of sorts, containing writings of considerable literary merit and literary and cultural interest.|
ENG 244
Spec Topics
Focuses on themes and topics of universal and/or current interest as embodied in literature. The special subject of Each semester's offerings will be announced in pre-registration. Suitable for both English and non-English majors and may be taken up,to three times for credit, provided different topics are offered. On demand.|
ENG 249
Satire
Provides an understanding of what satire is, what it accomplishes, and how it is related to other literary modes. Students will analyze subjects often targeted by satirists, such as racism, sexism, etc., and satiric techniques in such forms as fictio,n (which will include short stories by women and minority writers), poetry, art, music, films, and television satire. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
ENG 250
Western Mythology
Concentrates on Greco-Roman myth and legends to demonstrate the systematic nature and recurrent patterns of mythology. Designed to give students a thorough knowledge of content and to clarify questions of form. No prerequisite. Spring, annually.|
ENG 254
Movie Studies
Explores how movies mean through readings of various classic and popular texts, how movies construct viewers, and how they simultaneously mirror and create the cultures of which they are a part.Prerequisite: Successful completion of Gen. Ed. writing,requirement. Each semester.|
ENG 262
Intro To Eng Lang
Deals generally with the nature of language and specifically with the grammatical structures of modern English, its regional and social varieties, and certain highlights of its historical development. Each semester.|
ENG 263
Eng Grammars & Eng Usage
Provides an intensive study of English grammar and problems in usage. Emphasizes differences between prescriptive and descriptive approaches to usage, and between traditional and generative approaches to grammar. Each semester.|
ENG 265
Survey Of Women's Lit
Surveys women writers from the Medieval period to the present. The contributions of these women to a distinctly female literary tradition provides the focus of study, but critical issues regarding women's literature will also be discussed and explore,d. Pedagogical techniques will include lecture, discussion, film, and collaborative learning, among others. Fall, annually.|
ENG 270
Trng For Writing Ctr Tut
In conjunction with weekly staff meetings throughout the semester, tutors learn methods of responding to student writing, implementing corrective measures, and teaching as well as using word processing. Tutors are accepted by invitation only on the b,asis of performance in writing courses; minimum 3.0 QPA. Venango Campus only. Each semester.|
ENG 297
Writing & Visual Argument
Provides instruction in composing a visual, rhetorically driven argument based on an alphabetic text traditionally taught in composition classrooms. Elements of composition instruction such as planning, organization, rhetorical choices, audience awa,reness, purpose, and argument provide the foundation for written and visual assignments. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 111.|
ENG 298
Read & Writ Argmt & Persuasion
Offers advanced practice in analyzing and creating argumentative and persuasive texts, both written and visual. Students will analyze, write about, and produce written and visual arguments and persuasive texts in popular, political,legal, and academ,ic fields. Includes readings, writing, research, and presentations. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement.|
ENG 301
Writing Non-Fict Prose
Provides experience in writing non-fiction. Focuses on any of several types of non-fiction, including formal essay, autobiography, and creative non-fiction. Students will also study published examples of the genre under consideration and will critiq,ue examples presented by peers. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement. Each semester.|
ENG 303
Craft Of Fiction
Provides extensive practice in writing fiction. Student work receives intensive group critique. Course standards roughly approximate those of commercial fiction editors. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or permission of instructor, based on examination of wri,ting samples. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 304
Craft Of Poetry
Provides the advanced writer intensive practice in the writing of poetry. Students must produce a portfolio of high-quality poetry by the end of the course. Prerequisite: ENG 202 or permission of instructor based on examination of writing samples. Sp,ring, annually.|
ENG 306
Scien And Tech Writing
Provides experience in writing practical prose in a variety of scientific and/or technical settings for a broad spectrum of readers. Involves techniques of writing documents of definition, mechanism, and process description; sets of instructions; pro,posals and reports; and the use of appropriate document and graphic designs. Especially useful to majors in biology, chemistry, computer science, laboratory technology, nursing, physics, and others. Prerequisite: Junior standing. Spring, odd-numbere,d years.|
ENG 307
Business Writing
Uses specialized formats and the composing process to introduce the unique type of writing used in the business and organizational world. Emphasizes identifying and addressing diverse audiences with the specific messages needed. Students critique all, types of communications, use collaborative learning techniques, and develop skills needed to communicate in a pluralistic society. Requires students to compose letters, memos, persuasive messages, and reports. All documents must be typewritten. Prer,equisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement. Each semester.|
ENG 311
16th Century Prose/Po
Examines the non-dramatic literature of the 16th century and focuses on such figures as Sidney, Spenser, and Shakespeare. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 313
17th Century Eng Lit
Provides critical examination of the works, genres, and contexts of such figures as Bacon, Browne, Jonson, Donne, Herbert, Marvell, and Milton. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 315
18th Cent Eng Lit
Provides a critical examination of the words, contexts, and genres of such representative writers as Dryden, Pope, Swift, Defoe, Johnson, Boswell, and Gray, and traces the rise of the modern novel from Defoe through Austen and the role of women as au,thors and audience. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 317
Eng Romanticism
Considers the major works of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, Keats, and their contemporaries such as Mary Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft, and others, and relates them to the intellectual, political, and social currents of the time. Spring, even-,numbered years.|
ENG 319
Studies In Victorian Lit
Focuses on such poets and essayists as Carlyle, Newman, Tennyson, the Brownings, Arnold, the Rossettis, and Meredith. Examines the current renewal of interest in poetry by women and noncanonical writers. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 324
Images Of Working-Class Life
Examines the experience of working-class people from a number of perspectives: non-fiction, fiction, poetry, song, drama, film. Focuses on themes of class, identity, cultural influences, and economic and political power as they explicitly relate to, the issue of work. Offered Spring odd years. Prerequisite: For ENG credit successful completion of or exemption from general education writing requirement; for SOC credit SOC 211. Spring, odd years.|
ENG 325
Studies In Early American Lit
Explores various topics in 17th and 18th century American literature against the backdrop of Puritanism. Bradstreet, Taylor, Edwards, Franklin, and Wheatley are among the major figures encountered. Gives attention to the dynamics of molding a distinc,tively national literature. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 326
Studies In Amer Romanticism
Studies a selected group of writers to illustrate their contributions to American art and thought and their relationships with the development of Romanticism in the first half of the 19th century. Emphasizes Poe, Hawthorne, Melville, Emerson, Thore,au, and Whitman. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 327
Studies in Amer Real & Natural
Studies a selected group of writers to illustrate the development of realism and naturalism in American literature in the latter half of the 19th century. Emphasizes Twain, James, Howells, Crane, Norris, and Dickinson. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 328
Studies In Am Lit 1900-1945
Examines the period less as a unified site to be surveyed in terms of fiction, poetry, and drama than as a problematic field to be studied in terms of race, gender, and class. Authors include Wharton, Cather, Dos Passos, Hemingway, Hurston, and Faul,kner. Fall, annually.|
ENG 329
Studies In Contemp Amer Lit
Investigates the very idea of a canon for American literature since World War II and discusses strategies for reading such representative authors as Roth, Coover, Oates, and Morrison. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 331
Stu In Afri-Amer Novel
Studies in depth the development of the African-American novel from its origins in the slave narratives to the present. How do African-American novels fit into the larger tradition of African-American literature? What modes of thematic and narrative,discourse mark the particular characteristics of the African-American novel? Includes Douglass, Chesnutt, McKay, Hurston, Wright, Ellison, Reed, Walker, and Morrison.|
ENG 332
Brit Novel 19th Cent
Explores the English novel from Austen to Hardy. Nine or ten novels are studied with selections from Austen, Scott, Eliot, Dickens, Thackeray, Disraeli, Meredith, Trollope, the Brontes, Gaskell. No prerequisite; however, one semester of English lite,rature survey (ENG 221 or 222) is recommended. Fall, even-numbered years.|
ENG 334
Studies In Modern British Lit
Examines the relationship between social and cultural change and the creation of literature and theory in British literature from 1900 to the close of World War II. Provides an opportunity to compare genres and to study key literary movements. No p,rerequisite. One semester of ENG 221 or 222 is recommended. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 335
Studies In Contemp British Lit
Examines British literature produced from the end of World War II to the present. Provides an opportunity to compare genres and to study significant literary and cultural movements. No prerequisite. One semester of ENG 221 or 222 is recommended.,Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 339
Short Stories
Traces the evolution of the short story from the 19th century to the present. Elements such as plot, character, theme, style, and point of view are studied. Readings are drawn from a variety of writers representing a diversity of cultures: Poe, deMau,passant, Chopin, Gilman, Faulkner, Ellison, Kafka, Hurston, Fuentes, Lessing, Silko, Walker, and LeGuin. Spring, annually.|
ENG 340
Studies in Graphic Narratives
Introduces students to the scholarly study of sequential art, comics, graphic novels, and graphic narratives. Texts and approach will vary. Prerequisites: ENG 111 or equivalent.|
ENG 341
20th Century Poetry
Provides explication and discussion of works by such writers as Yeats, Frost, Eliot, Plath, L. Hughes, Auden, Brooks, and Rich. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 342
English Drama 1642
Presents an overview of English drama in its first two phases, Medieval and Renaissance (non-Shakespearean). Includes literary, theatrical, and cultural studies. No prerequisite. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 343
Eng Drama 1660-1850
Presents some of the major forms of drama in this extremely varied 200-year period, with possible focuses on heroic tragedy, Restoration comedy, sentimental comedy, Victorian melodrama, and the precursors of modern English drama. No prerequisite. F,all, even-numbered years.|
ENG 344
Modern Drama To 1950
Surveys influential dramatic literature of the Continental, British, and American theater from 1850 to 1950 through lectures, discussion, and experiences related to the modern stage. No prerequisite. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 345
Contemporary Drama
Explores the diversity and vitality of British, American, and World theater since 1950 through selected texts and theatrical experiences. No prerequisite. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 350
Movie Genres
Explores genre as sets of narrative conventions that have vitalized American movies. Demonstrates genre to be a socializing force as well as a mirror of social change. Considers representations of race, gender, and class in various genres. Spring, od,d-numbered years.|
ENG 352
Topics In Folklore
Provides intense study of one or more aspects of folklore study. Focuses on one or more folk groups, a particular folk genre, folklore and popular culture, or folklore and literature. Offers students a fieldwork experience-collection, transcription,,classification-and methods of analysis of oral traditions. No prerequisite. Spring, annually.|
ENG 353
American Voices
Provides an introduction to American dialectology and sociolinguistics. Emphasizes the great diversity and vitality of American English. Covers the causes and mechanisms of linguistic changes, the role of language differences in society, and the rele,vance of dialectology to language teaching. Pays special attention to the regional speech patterns of Pennsylvania. No prerequisite. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 354
Topics In World Lit
Provides an in-depth study of world literature through the examination of the development of a particular literary genre, movement, or theme that crosses national or cultural boundaries; or a significant national or cross-cultural English language tr,adition that falls outside the conventional canons of British and American literature. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 355
Topics Lit Theory
Provides a historical study of literary criticism and aesthetic theory with emphasis upon modern trends. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 356
Rhetor Thy For Writers
Explores such questions as why do we communicate in writing, how does writing help us learn, how does writing facilitate, change, or affect the nature of communication? Students examine in detail the works of figures such as Plato, Cicero, Nietzsche,, Bakhtin, Derrida, and Kristeva, and study how rhetorical theory is used in everyday communication. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement.|
ENG 361
English Study Off-Campus
Provides students with an opportunity to travel to significant literary and historical sites while reading and discussing related texts. Students would travel during university breaks and would meet with the instructor for orientation prior to trave,l. After travel is completed, students will turn in assignments according to a schedule developed by instructor. No prerequisite. Spring, even-numbered years on demand.|
ENG 363
Literature and Medicine
Explores the broad range of literature (short fiction, novel, poetry, memoir, drama/film) that expresses the human experiences of illness, disability, healing, and dying from the perspectives of patients, caregivers, and health care practitioners (ph,ysicians, nurses, allied health professionals). The course will emphasize social and historical contexts and represent the diversity of these experiences, especially in terms of race/ethnicity, gender, and class, with further consideration of the inf,luences of scientific and technological advances over time. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful completion of the general education writing requirement.|
ENG 364
Literature of Aging
Explores the broad range of literature (short fiction, novel, poetry, memoir,drama/film) that expresses the human experiences of aging and depicts images of aging and the aged, with a focus on aging in relationship to identity, love, family, and comm,unity and on the concerns of independence/dependence, loneliness/alienation, friendship, faith, creativity and renewal, ageism, death, and bereavement from literary and social scientific perspectives. Prerequisite: Exemption from or successful compl,etion of the general education writing requirement.|
ENG 365
Images Women Lit
Examines images of women in myth, literature, and the culture at large and applies contemporary feminist critical approaches to the study of these images. Spring, annually.|
ENG 368
Gender, Lit, Popular Culture
Examines representations, issues, constructions of gender in literature, myth, and popular culture. The focus and theme will vary. Applies feminist, queer, and cultural theory to the texts. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ENG 111, and sopho,more standing.|
ENG 380
Language And Culture
An introduction to linguistic anthropology. Focuses on the main areas of intersection between language and culture. Topics may include: animal communication systems; primate language studies; the evolution of language; linguistic diversity; linguis,tic relativity (a.k.a. the Sapir/Whorf Hypothesis); language endangerment and revival; nonverbal communication; linguistic field methods; ethnopoetics; sociolinguistics; language and identity; language and gender; and the ethnography of speaking. Fr,om an examination of such topics, students will learn to see how people use language to create and maintain their cultures, and to recognize the ways in which language itself influences human thought and behavior.|
ENG 381
Documentary Writing
Examines the historical, social, literary, and rhetorical significance of the genre of documentary writing combined with practice of the genre itself. Emphaszizes documentary writing as a means of witness, inquiry, and persuasion. Students select a, field site and use ethnographic and ssecondary research to produce a portfolio of documentary essays. Historical and current examples of documentary writing will provide models for students throughout the course.|
ENG 401
Chaucer
Studies in Middle English of Chaucer's early poems, Troilus and Criseyde, and the Canterbury Tales. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 404
Adv Creative Writing
Advanced course for experienced creative writing students. Provides independent and extensive explorations into a creative writing project. Helps prepare students for future writing careers and/or graduate school in creative and professional writin,g. Prerequisite: ENG 202 and ENG 301 or 303 or 304 or permission from instructor. Offered: Every other Spring.|
ENG 406
Studies In Medieval Lit
Examines medieval British literature (ca 800 - 1550) in its historical and cultural contexts. Content will vary. May focus on a genre (epic, remance, saga, drama, poetry, saints'lives, and allegorical pilgrimage), major writer (Gawain-poet, Malory),,or theme (such love and violence, the nature of evil, the monstrous). May be repeated twice for credit provided that content (topic and texts) change. Prerequisite: Successful completion of or exemption from the general education writing requiremen,t; upper-level standing or permission of instructor. Fall, even years|
ENG 410
Studies In Arthurian Lit/Film
Examines texts and issues in Arthurian tradition, from early medieval to modern. Texts will vary, but may include Chretien de Troyes' Arthurian Romances, Sir Thomas Malory's Morte D'arthur, Tennyson's Idyllis of the King, T.H. White's Once and Futur,e King, Zimmer-Bradley's Mists of Avalon and the films Excalibur, Lancelot and King Arthur. Texts may be approached through the lens of genre, historical development, cultural/political context, depiction and development of characters.|
ENG 412
Shakespeare: Com & Hist
Provides study and discussion of problems of style, characterization, and motivation in Shakespeare's maturing and experimental comedies and his history plays. Also examines how the plays reflect and challenge the cultural attitudes of Shakespeare's, time. Fall, annually.|
ENG 413
Shakespeare: Trage & Rom
Provides study and discussion of problems of style, characterization, and motivation in Shakespeare's tragedies and romances. Also examines the production practices of Shakespeare's time and contemporary production approaches. Spring, annually.|
ENG 454
The Novel Across Culture
Examines the genre of the novel from an international perspective, with readings from several national or cultural traditions. Includes an overview of theoretical approaches to the novel that focus on its adaptability across national and cultural bo,rders. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 455
Stud In Drama & Theory
Provides an intensive exploration of drama, concentrating especially on contemporary developments in both drama itself and in the theoretical study of drama, including recent critical developments in ethnic, feminist, and performance approaches to dr,amatic texts. Focus of course varies. No prerequisite.|
ENG 457
Intro To Linguistics
Presents key concepts and basic analytical procedures common to many contemporary linguistics theories. Covers phonetics and phonology, morphology, and syntax in detail. Analyzes the integration of these sub-systems in the overall design of a generat,ive grammar. Prerequisite: ANTH/ENG 262. Fall, annually.|
ENG 458
Hist-Eng Lang
Studies the history of the language, including its origins and changes in structure, usage, pronunciation, spelling, vocabulary, and meaning. Intensive readings in Old and Middle English. Spring, even-numbered years.|
ENG 459
Lang Across Cult: Mat & Assess
Introduces current research in first and second language acquisition with emphasis on the preparation of classroom teachers and other professionals to work with children/adults coming from a background where languages other than English are spoken.,Prerequisite: ENG 262 recommended but not required. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
ENG 460
Independent Study
Permits students to explore an area of special interest in the English language or its literature. Students must develop a plan of study, secure the approval of a member of the English faculty willing to supervise the project, and submit the plan to,the department chair. Maximum credits--six. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing.|
ENG 462
Meth Teach Eng Non-Nat Speak
This course provides an overview of the current trends in Teaching English as a Second Language Methodology. It will explore techniques that may be used to teach students who are part of the regular classroom but who need to develop skills in langua,ge to be able to succeed. Techniques involving speaking, reading, writing and listening activities will be discussed along with interactive exercises utilizing the culturally diverse language styles found in a regular classroom. Students will be tr,ained to utilize the comprehensible input of native-speaking members of the class as well as to improve upon their own interaction style. Major approaches and methods in language teaching such as grammar translation, audiolingualism, communicative l|
ENG 463
Second Language Acquisition
This course provides an overview of the current state of the art in Second Language Acquisition studies and explores the linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic factors in learning a second language. Pre-requisite: ENG 262.|
ENG 470
Literature For Young Adults
Introduces future teachers to classical and contemporary literature for young adults. Includes works from various genres written by American, British, and American minority authors. Also includes some world literature and film. In addition to devel,oping first-hand knowledge of important works in the field, students will also become familiar with its history and with the controversies that have shaped it. Fall, annually.|
ENG 480
Writing For Professions
A workshop in applied writing--specifically, writing for the professions: business, education, law, and among others, academic research. Prerequisite: One of the following: ENG 207, a 300 -level writing course, or consent of the instructor.|
ENG 482
Cont Pract Teach Writ
Provides a systematic study of theory and practice in the teaching of composition, conducted through workshop methods. Requires extensive writing and a major written project. Prerequisites: secondary education majors in English must have completed E,NG 111, 200, or 301 and have taken or be taking their methods course; others by permission of the instructor. Fall, annually.|
ENG 499
Senior Seminar
Explores in a seminar setting a theme, an idea, or an issue beyond the scope of individual courses. Studies primary literature and relevant criticism. A major paper is required of all participants; other course requirements will be established by t,he instructor prior to the semester of offering. Required of senior liberal arts English majors. Fall, annually.|
ENG 501
Intro To English Studies
An introduction to the strategies of graduate and professional discourse in English studies. The course also includes an introduction to bibliographic and library resources in the field. Should be taken at or near the beginning of graduate study. Fa,ll, annually.|
ENG 509
Seminar In Lit Theory
A seminar on general and/or selected theoretical issues implicit in the reading of literary texts. Depending upon the instructor, the course may cover broad matters of interpretation (authorial intention, the reader?s share, intertextuality), focus o,n more specific theories of reading (reader-response, phenomenology, post-structuralism), or consider the conceptual foundations of certain literary structures (narrative, genre, tropes).|
ENG 510
Seminar In English Lit
This course provides students with critical strategies to apply to specific periods, figures, or problems in English literature. This course may be taken more than once if the course content is different.|
ENG 511
Seminar In American Lit
This course provides students with critical strategies to apply to specific periods, figures, or problems in American literature. This course may be taken more than once if the course content is different.|
ENG 512
Seminar In Lit Studies
This seminar encompasses topics that combine English, American, and other literatures in a critical discourse. Topics may include ethnic, non-canonical, and comparative literature. Studies in the novel, drama, and the satire may be subjects of this s,eminar. This course may be taken more than once if the course content is different.|
ENG 515
Seminar In Film Lang
Film language views movies as a discourse medium, using a variety of formal structures: montage, mise-en-scene, and narrative and non-narrative patterns. These grammatical and rhetorical elements will be studied as they structure representative movie, texts. Specific theories of film will also be reviewed.|
ENG 520
Sem In Writ:Theory & Res
Seminar in Writing explores important movements in rhetorical theory and recent trends in research as conceptually applied to writing, education, and related fields. Students study major theories about the nature of writing and scientific inquiry int,o it.|
ENG 521
Seminar In Comp Studies
Seminar in Composition Studies, which builds on the classroom practices presented in ENG 520, examines recent issues and innovations in writing with emphasis on the subspecialties of writing. Topics may include: the composing process, computers in co,mposition, evaluation, writing across the curriculum, or critical thinking and writing.|
ENG 522
Pract In Coll Teaching
This course introduces prospective composition instructors to the principles and practices of teaching at the college or university levels and provides a forum for discussing those ideas. Students will observe composition classes, draft syllabi, and,develop, sequence, and test writing assignments. Emphasis is placed on diagnosing writing weaknesses, responding to writing, and evaluating it.|
ENG 523
Internship In Writing
Interns receive tutorial, promotional, educational, organizational, or technical writing experience in university or other professional settings. This course provides for writing and editing tasks appropriate to the unit or organization. Some adminis,trative and research work may be involved. (No more than 6 credits may be taken from ENG 523 and ENG 522 combined.)|
ENG 530
Seminar In Linguistics
A study of the philosophical basis of present day generative-transformational theory and its relationship to language acquisition and semantics.|
ENG 531
Sem Hist Of Eng Lang
Advanced study in historical linguistics. The development of the English language is reviewed toward supporting study and analysis of original historical texts in the English language. Students may elect a general approach or focus on a specific hist,orical period.|
ENG 534
Workshops In English
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ENG 540
Independent Study
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ENG 562
Meth Teach Eng Non-Nat Speak
Overview of the current trends in Teaching English as a Second Language Methodology. Explores techniques that may be used to teach students who are part of the regular classroom but who need to develop skills in language to be able to succeed. Techni,ques involving speaking, reading, writing, and listening activities are discussed, along with interactive exercises utilizing the culturally diverse language styles found in a regular classroom. Students utilize the comprehensible input of native-spe,aking members of the class and improve upon their own interaction style. Major approaches and methods in language teaching such as grammar trnaslation, audiolingualism, communicative language teaching, and the natural approach are discussed, along wi|
ENG 563
Second Language Acquisition
Provides an overview of the current state-of-the-art in Second Language Acquisiton studies and explores the linguistic, psycholinguistic, and sociolinguistic factors in learning a second language. Every three semesters.|
ENG 601
Thesis And Research
This course provides Master's candidates in English with the opportunity to conduct research or literature review for the purposes of writing the Master's Thesis and/or preparing for the Qualifying Examination. Thesis and Examination track students,only. Prerequisite: Advancement to Candidacy, pursuant to the approval of an acceptable research proposal.|
ENG 602
Teacher Research Portfolio
Master's in Education candidates will propose a classroom-based research project, conduct the project, and assemble their findings into a portfolio. Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy, pursusant to the approval of an acceptable research proposal,.|
ENVR 261
Physics Of Energy & Environ
This course is the study of the physical laws and processes that underlie environmental phenomena with a special focus on energy (mechanical, thermal and electrical). We will establish both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the underly,ing physical processes. Technical, economic, and social consequences of these laws and processes will be examined to better delineate the complex decisions related to human energy use and environmental issues. This course might serve as a substitut,e for PH 251 (General Physics I) and will prepare students equally well for PH 252 (General Physics II) should that course be required of their major. Prerequisite: Algebra|
ENVR 275
Envir Studies & Policies
Introduces students to the basic language and methodologies used in environmental studies. Examines management policies and diversity of land uses associated with each property. Students study key ecological habitats, some rather pristine and others,highly impacted by humans. Students learn the role science plays in each situation, conduct basic laboratory and field research to learn how scientific data are obtained, and learn the roles history, sociology, politics, economics, etc. play in polic,y decisions. The course is presently linked to ecological economics for those students enrolled in the transdisciplinary environment and society minor. Two lectures and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisite: One semester of biology, chemistry,|
ENVR 475
Field Nat History
Explores competencies in biology, meteorology, geology, and astronomy. Emphasizes developing competencies which will be valuable in teaching environmental (outdoor and conservation) education. For non-science majors. Prerequisite: Upper-division stan,ding. Spring, annually.|
ENVR 490
Sem In Environ & Society
Interdisciplinary seminar synthesizes knowledge and skills acquired in lower-division courses through unifying environmental studies. Broad theme offers a variety of dimensions for study and research. Bases studies and research around environmental s,ituations existing in this northwest region of Pennsylvania. Two lecture and three laboratory hours weekly. Prerequisites: Junior standing, ENVR 275, PHIL 212, ECON 202, plus nine additional hours of environment and society courses, or consent of ins,tructor. Spring, annually.|
ENVR 500
Graduate Sem In Environ Sci
A survey of current literature, concepts, theory, and applications from selected fields of environmental science. One to two discussion hours weekly. By arrangement. Fall and Spring, yearly.|
ENVR 501
Environ Sci Internship
Internships provide practical experiences that are related to a student?s academic program or research area. Credits earned can be utilized as partial fulfillment of the Master of Science degree in biology. Students considering internship credits to,be applied toward the Master of Science degree must have the approval of their graduate advisory committee, the cooperating agency, and the appropriate university administrators. On demand.|
ENVR 600
Spec Problems In Environ Sci
Advanced topics in environmental science. The professor selects the format most suitable to the study. Course offered on request of students, subject to availability of staff. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On demand.|
ENVR 700
Research & Thesis Environ Sci
Independent research project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty member. Required of all students working toward the thesis option Master of Science in Biology, Environmental Science concentration. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. On,demand.|
ES 111
Basic Earth Science
Surveys the earth sciences, including Earth-space relations. Includes Earth motions, development of landforms, weather and climate, soils and related vegetation, water as a resource, and oceans. Emphasizes the lithosphere (mountain building and erosi,on) and the atmosphere. Each semester. ES 111 or permission of instructor.|
ES 140
Natural Disasters
Focuses on natural disasters and the normal processes of the earth/atmosphere system which produce them. Particular attention is placed on the energy sources that cause underlying disasters such as plate tectonics, weather/storm processes, climate c,hange, processes operating in rock, water and the atmosphere, the significance of geologic time, complexities of multiple variables operating simultaneously, and detailed case histories of significant events. The course is acceptable for natural sci,ence credits. Prerequisite: none. Annually.|
ES 150
Physical Geology w/Lab
Study of the earth, including minerals and rocks, and the processes, both constructional and destructional, which have shaped it since it was formed. Constructional processes include volcanism, mountain building, and sedimentation. Destructional proc,esses include the erosional activity of streams, glaciers, ground water, waves, and wind. Acquaints students with the methods and work of geologists and with some of the research at the frontiers of geology. Two hours lecture, two hours laboratory. N,o prerequisites. Each semester.|
ES 160
Explorations In Earth Sci
Designed to fully explore the physical landscape of a predetermined region/location. The chosen region/location varies annually. Interactions between climate, weather, landscape evolution, soils, water resources, oceanographic influences (where app,licable), glacial processes (where applicable), and plate tectonics are examined relative to the resulting physical environment for the region/location. Online and field methodologies are combined to examine applicable physical processes. A capston,e field course will be administered during the last week of the semester to directly explore the region/location. The course is acceptable for natural science credits. Prerequisite: sophomore standing. Annually during summer.|
ES 200
Solar System Astron
Examines the motions of Earth, moon, and the planets and their effects on the appearance of the sky; the nature of the sun and the planets; the instruments of the astronomer; and the role the history of astronomy played in the development of our unde,rstanding of the sky. Includes constellation identification through the use of the planetarium. Each semester.|
ES 201
Stellar Astronomy
Explores human understanding of the nature, formation, and evolution of those celestial objects that lie beyond the solar system. Includes stellar properties and spectra, stellar evolution, special stars and star systems, the milky way and other gala,xies, cosmology, and cosmogony. Uses the planetarium for constellation study and the development of coordinate systems. Prerequisite: ES 200. Spring, annually.|
ES 210
Fund of Digital Mapping
Introduces the basic knowledge required to work with digital maps. General and specialized online and desktop mapping options are discussed, and an introduction to the geo-spatial technologies, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global P,ositioning Systems (GPS) and Remote Sensing is emphasized. The potential uses of those technologies in the areas such as environmental studies, forestry, marketing, demographics, and utilities are also presented.|
ES 225
Cartography I With Lab
Systematic study of basic concepts and components of thematic map-making. Emphasizes familiarization with and utilization of drafting instruments and equipment essential to map design and construction. Presents techniques of photographic reproduction, of student map projects. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or consent of instructor. Offered annually.|
ES 250
Historical Geology w/Lab
Deals with the changes the Earth has experienced through time. Emphasizes the geologic evidence for plate tectonic movements of ocean basins and continents, uplift and erosion of mountains, and deposition of strata in various sedimentary basins. Exam,ines in detail the evolutionary changes and mass extinction of life-forms, as preserved in the fossil record. Prerequisite: ES 150 (may be taken concurrently). Offered Spring Semester annually.|
ES 255
Geomorphology With Lab
Study of the physical forces that sculpt and modify the landforms of the earth, including chiefly weathering, streams, glaciation, and shore processes. Includes some preliminary work on topographic and geologic maps and rocks. Called geomorphology in, older catalogs. Prerequisite: ES 150. Offered annually.|
ES 260
Environmental Geology
Examines the uses of geology in the solution of human problems with the physical environment. Includes hazardous geologic environments, mineral and energy resources, water supply, waste disposal, and the uses of geology in urban and regional planning,. Draws many examples from western Pennsylvania. Prerequisite: ES 150 or 111. Offered annually.|
ES 270
Oceanography
A study of the physical properties, marine biology, chemistry, and geology of the oceans, and to a minor extent, the role of the sea in the history, culture, and technical developments of humankind. Once annually.|
ES 280
Meteorology
Introduces the earth's atmosphere. Emphasizes the laws and underlying principles of atmospheric motion and change, earth-sun relationships, atmospheric composition and structure, the general circulation of the atmosphere, winds and wind systems, the,precipitation process, and the genesis and life cycle of storms. Prerequisite: ES 111.|
ES 300
Special Topics
Topics of special interest in various areas of earth science. The professor selects and designs the format most suitable to the study. Enrollment by consent of the instructor.|
ES 310
Intro To Geophysics
Explores theoretical and exploration geophysics, including physical characteristics of the earth such as its shape, rotation, and procession; seismology and the interior conditions of the earth; geomagnetism and paleomagnetism; radioactivity and dati,ng techniques; gravity and tides; internal heat; well logging; electrical techniques, such as resistivity; and plate tectonics and its mechanisms. Prerequisites: ES 150, 250, PH 251, 252; or permission of instructor. Every other year.|
ES 325
Cartography II With Lab
A systematic study of the new dimensions of cartography in use today. Emphasizes the techniques used in the construction of three-dimensional maps and models of statistical surfaces, diagrams, cartograms, negative scribing, and color separation. Two,lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Every other year.|
ES 330
Hydrogeology With Lab
Hydrogeology deals with both surface water and groundwater in the hydrologic cycle using quantitative methods. Examines aquifer systems, water wells, water quality, water resource management, groundwater flow, and pollutant transport in detail during, labs, field trips, and site tours. Prerequisite: ES 150. Offered Fall Semester annually.|
ES 345
Computer Cartog w/Lab
Systematic study of the newest dimension of cartography in use today. Designing and constructing computer maps is an integral part of the course. Students create computer maps with a number of programs, including Atlas Graphics, Atlas Draw, Microam,,Map Info. PC Globe, PS USA, Systate, etc. Introduces the use of the digitizer. Prerequisite CIS 110 or equivalent course, or consent of the instructor. Every other spring.|
ES 350
Structural Geology
Investigates the geometry, origin, and recognition of the main structural features of the rocks of the earth's crust, including folds, faults, joints, unconformities, larger igneous bodies, cleavage, lineation, etc. Explores interpreting structure fr,om geologic maps, structural petrology, and geophysical methods used in structural geology. Prerequisite: ES 150. Every third semester.|
ES 355
Invert Paleontol
Explores the outstanding invertebrate animals preserved in the fossil record. Examines the nature of the fossil record itself, evolution as shown by fossils, and classification problems in paleontology. Prerequisite: ES 250. Every other year.|
ES 360
Mineralogy
Examines the identification, uses, physical and chemical properties, occurrence, origin, and crystallography of the common minerals. Prerequisite: At least high school chemistry. Every third semester.|
ES 370
Petrology
The identification, occurrence and origin, classification, physical and chemical properties, and uses of the common rocks. Includes a brief study of the important rock forming minerals. Prerequisite: ES 150. Every third semester.|
ES 385
Climatology
Examines the major components of climate and climate change. Analyzes physical aspects of the atmosphere as a series of long-term weather phenomena. Studies regional characteristics of climate on the basis of worldwide weather patterns. Emphasizes, how applied aspects of climate demonstrate the interrelationships and importance of both physical and regional climatology to humankind. Also examines the causes of long-term climate change and variability. Acceptable for social science or natural, science credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.|
ES 390
Strat & Sedime Petrology
Systematic study of clastic and carbonate stratigraphic sequences, emphasizing interpretation of lithofacies, tectono-sedimentary settings, and sequence stratigraphy. Laboratories include study of petrologic/diagenetic characteristics of sedimentary,strata, recent advances in seismic stratigraphy, and basin analysis. Prerequisite: ES 150. (ES 250, ES 360, and ES 370 are recommended.) Every third semester.|
ES 400
Intro Remote Sensing/Lab
Explores aerial photographs for geographic investigation of physical and cultural features of the landscape; the application of remote sensing to topographic and planimetric map construction, agricultural and land use identification, landform study,,and forestry. Each Fall Semester.|
ES 404
Soils With Lab
Comprehensively examines the classification, formation, and interpretation of soils. Students examine the processes of soil classification (both the zonal classification and the soil taxonomy classification), soil formation (parent material, climate,, slope, time and organic activity), and the interpretation of pedogenic sequences (as it relates to deposition, diagenesis, and climate change). Laboratory (one credit, two hours) complements lecture portion of the course. Emphasizes the field interp,retation of soils as well as the geochemistry and textual classification of soils. Prerequisites: ES 150 and 255 or permission of the instructor.|
ES 425
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Examines satellite-based earth imaging instruments, data sources, and products, and their applications to land use management, geologic assessments, agriculture, forestry, soil resources, archeology, meteorology, and oceanography. Utilizes visual and, digital data. Prerequisite: GEOG 400 (can be waived by permission of instructor). Every Spring.|
ES 450
Field Geography w/Lab
Explores techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn the techniques and procedures of rural and urban land use, surveying, and field research. Prerequisites: c,onsent of instructor. Summer on demand.|
ES 455
Field Methods in Geoscience
Field-based course provides upper-level undergraduates hands-on experience in hydrogeology, meteorology, bedrock, and surficial geology projects. Group projects include GIS-based analysis of a small watershed, geologic mapping, and measurement of a s,tratigraphic section, soils and terrace mapping, and surveying a strip mine remediation site. Emphasizes proper use of traditional and state-of-the-art instruments and equipment. Prerequisites: ES 150 and ES 330. Offered Summer Session I annually.|
ES 460
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
ES 470
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. These include an entire sequence of build,ing spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 (can be waived by instructor),. Fall, annually.|
ES 476
Sci Tech & Soc: Topics
Interdisciplinary course designed to acquaint students with information, curricula and teaching methodologies appropriate for integrating STS topics into science and social studies instruction. Includes topics in nature of science, history of scien,ce, history of technology, ethical decision-making, and the influences of changes in sciecne and technology on society. Required for all secondary science and social studies education majors. Spring semester. Prerequisite: Junior Standing|
ES 481
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
ES 490
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem solving in applied settings. Lecture and application-/project-based. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduce stud,ents to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 470. Each Spring Semester.|
ES 500
Intro Arphoto Int Rem Sens
Study and assessment of the physical and cultural features of the earth using satellite images and aerial photographs. Uses black and white photos, color infrared photos, and digital satellite images for planimetric map construction, agricultural and, vegetation studies, landform identification, land use assessment, and forestry. Laboratory activities include analysis of imagery in different zones of the electromagnetic spectrum, geometric correction of satellite images, and computer-assisted lan,d cover classification. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.|
ES 525
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Builds on the content of Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing. Uses Earth imaging satellites, such as Lansat, SPOT, and Ikonos, and introduces new instruments, including Radarsat, Space Shuttle, and Space Station earth imagine,instruments. Examines various digital data sets including digital elevation models (DEMS), digital orthophotos and digital topographic maps. Students will work together on a drainage basin study to assess the sources of acid pollution using computer-,assisted land cover classification, manual photo interpretation, and field reconnaissance to identify trip mine areas and acid discharging oil/gas wells. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 500. Spring, annually.|
ES 550
Field Geography w/Lab
Systematic study of techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn techniques and procedures of compass traversing, plane tabling, rural and urban land use survey,ing, and field research. Prerequisite: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.|
ES 555
Field Meth Environ Geos
Field-based course designed to give upper-level students hands-on experience in various aspects of hydrogeology, surficial geology and meteorlogy. Emphasis on principles and practice of the most recent field and laboratory techniques of instrumentati,on, sampling, and monitoring as applied to relevant environmental problems. Prerequisite: ES 260, 280, and 330. Summer session, on demand.|
ES 560
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
ES 570
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. Lab includes an entire sequence of buildi,ng spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 or permission of instructor. F,all, annually.|
ES 581
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
ES 590
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem-solving in applied setting. Lecture- and application/project-based course. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduc,e students to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 570. Spring, annually.|
FIN 170
Intro To Finance
Introduces students to the rudiments of finance and elementary financial decision making. Surveys the basics of investments, financial management, and financial markets and institutions. No prerequisites. Annually.|
FIN 370
Financial Management
Examines the acquisition, management, and analysis of short-term and long-term funds both in the domestic and international environment. Emphasizes financial analysis, time value of money and valuation of securities, working capital management, capit,al budgeting under certainty and uncertainty, risk and return, cost of capital, and the optimal capital structure. Prerequisites: ECON 212 and ACTG 252. Each semester.|
FIN 371
Interm Finance
In-depth study of corporate financial issues that face today's financial manager. Students learn to incorporate risk into capital budgeting decisions; study mergers and acquisitions; analyze bankruptcies, reorganizations, and lease financing; and stu,dy other advanced financial issues prevalent in today's domestic and multinational corporations. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Annually.|
FIN 373
Fund Of Insurance
A study of the concept of risk management and the several methods for handling risks. Emphasizes insurance as transfer method. Discusses fundamental principles of insurance, insurance as a contract, and the insurance policy, including property and li,ability coverage, life and health, and social insurance. Annually.|
FIN 374
Prop/Casualty Ins
In-depth study of property and liability risk exposures, personal and commercial lines, production, underwriting, claims, ratemaking, and loss control functions as well as regulations of insurance. Prerequisite: FIN 373. Spring, annually.|
FIN 375
Mgmt Finan Inst
Descriptive analysis of the operations of financial institutions, such as commercial banks, savings banks, insurance companies. Examines techniques and principles involved in the management of financial institutions. Prerequisites: ECON 211 and FIN 3,70. Annually.|
FIN 376
Investments
Examines investment goals and the current environment for investments, including the nature of the investment process and securities markets; analysis of risk and return, especially as it applies to common stocks, preferred stocks, and bonds; introdu,ction to portfolio management and portfolio theory. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Fall, annually.|
FIN 377
Medical Care Fin
The role of a financial manager in the health care setting. A study of the theoretical and analytical procedures involved in medical fund raising, capital budgeting, expense analysis, rate structuring, and hospital asset management as well as other f,inancial abilities required in the operation and planning of modern health care facilities. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Offered on demand.|
FIN 378
Personal Finance
This course will contain a review of each of the major segments of personal finance, including the financial planning process, cash budgeting, credit card and debt management, investing, insurance policies and strategies, tax planning strategies, ret,irement plans, employee benefits, and estates, wills, and trusts. This course is not available for Personal Finance majors or for any student who has completed FIN 474: Personal Financial Planning. Prerequisite: Junior standing or instructor's per,mission. Fall, biennially.|
FIN 399
Special Topics
Presents various current topics in finance theory and practice. Covers different topics from year to year, as subjects of importance are identified. Prerequisite: FIN 370. On demand.|
FIN 463
Tax Planning
Acquaints students with tax planning techniques that can be used to accomplish an individual's financial goals. Enables students to suggest actions that fit the individual's financial priorities based on an understanding of financial position, cash f,low and income, gift and estate tax matters. Prerequisite: ACTG 353.|
FIN 471
Financial Problems
Capstone course challenges students to integrate and synthesize, through case methods, their knowledge in finance. Emphasizes corporate finance in application of theoretical underpinning, but some cases also will deal with investments, financial inst,itutions, and markets. Prerequisite: FIN 371.|
FIN 473
Retrmnt Est Plan
An overview of individual income taxation, including an in-depth look at pensions, profit sharing, and other deferred compensation plans, estates, trusts, and applicable tax laws. Prerequisite: FIN 463. Once annually.|
FIN 474
Personal Financial Planning
Capstone course requires that students apply through case studies, written reports, and presentations each of the major segments of personal financial planning including the financial planning process, ethical and professional considerations of finan,cial planning, insurance policies and strategies, risk management, investment vehicles, tax planning strategies, retirement plans and employee benefits, and estate planning. Students are encouraged to complete the other courses within the Personal F,inancial Planning major prior to or contemporaneous with completion of this course. Prerequisite: FIN 370. Spring, annually.|
FIN 476
Portfolio Theory & Mgmt
Examines modern portfolio theory and its application to investment strategies; study of options and future markets; investigation of market efficiency. Prerequisite: FIN 376. Annually|
FIN 480
Multinational Finance
Examines the theory and practice of financial management in the multinational firms. Focuses on important differences between domestic and international financial decision-making. Prerequisite: FIN 370.|
FIN 500
Financial Management
Examines the acquisition, management, and analysis of short-term and long-term funds both in the domestic and international environment. Emphasizes financial analysis, time value of money and valuation of securities, working capital management, capit,al budgeting under certainty and uncertainty, risk and return, cost of capital, and the optimal capital structure.|
FIN 570
Managerial Finance
A study of financial management approaches to evaluating complex alternatives for using available resources in both a domestic and a multinational context. Prerequisites: ACTG 252, FIN 370.|
FIN 671
Fin Theory & Pract
A case-study approach to the theory and practice of corporate financial issues which must be addressed by a financial manager. Emphasis will be placed on capital budgeting decisions under varying circumstances and theoretical corporate financial conc,erns. Prerequisite: FIN 570.|
FIN 676
Investment Mgmt
A study of the structure and management of investment portfolios. Various types of investments are examined in terms of their risk elements and the purposes they serve.|
FR 101
Special Topics
Experts on individual countries cover historical and contemporary developments on the European intellectual scene with regard to their relevance for the present American student generation. The special subject is announced at pre-registration. Open,to all students, and may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course conducted in English. No prerequisite.|
FR 103
French Civilization
Introduces contemporary French society, enlightened by glimpses at France's rich history. A study of geography, politics, family life, immigration, art, music, literature, the current status of French feminism, and French media will help students de,fine and understand the multiple aspects of French identity. Course conducted in English. No prerequisite.|
FR 109
French Lit In Trans
A study of representative French literary works emphasizing the characters and ideas that have influenced both French literature and literature of other countries. Course conducted in English. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
FR 140
French Film
Surveys major French films with English subtitles, and provides an introduction to trends of French cinema. Emphasizes cultural differences between Francophone and Anglo-American cultures as revealed through film. Course conducted in English. No pr,erequisite. Fall, annually.|
FR 150
Intensive Elem French I
Equivalent to FR 151 and 152 combined. Fall, annually.|
FR 151
Elementary French I
Introduces the French language, emphasizing all language skills -- listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Each semester.|
FR 152
Elementary French II
Continuation of FR 151. Prerequisite: FR 151 or equivalent. Each semester.|
FR 153
Elementary Conversation
Conversational practice emphasizing communication skills. Designed for students who want to increase their aural-oral proficiency. May be taken concurrently with FR 251. Prerequisite: FR 152 or equivalent.|
FR 250
Intensive Inter Fr II
Equivalent to FR 251 and 252 combined. Prerequisite: FR 150 or FR 152, or equivalent. Spring, annually.|
FR 251
Intermed French I (French III)
Continuation of FR 152, with greater emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: FR 150 or 152, or equivalent. Fall, annually.|
FR 252
Interm French II (French IV)
Continuation of FR 251. Prerequisite: FR 251 or equivalent. Spring, annually.|
FR 253
Business French
Study of the language needed to conduct common business transactions, and discuss financial and technological matters in French. Includes writing of business letters and reports in French. Emphasizes cultural differences between French and American, business practices. Prerequisite: FR 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
FR 257
French Immersion
This course consists of a week of intensive instruction in French language and culture, prior to a two-week trip to France. During this period, students will visit places of historical and cultural interest in the country, receive lectures on the hi,storical, cultural, artistic and literary importance of the sites visited, and conduct as much of thier daily routines in French as possible.|
FR 260
French Short Story
Study of 19th and 20th century French short stories. All readings, discussions, and assignments in French. Required for French and French education majors. Prerequisite: FR 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
FR 265
Inter Conversation
Practice creative language use in conversation to develop oral proficiency. May be substituted for FR 252, with permission of instructor. Required for French and French education majors. Prerequisite: FR 251 or equivalent.|
FR 270
Intro To French Phon & Pronun
Introduces the French phonetic system, including the study of phonemes, intonation, stress, and rhythm. Provides intensive aural/oral training through phonetic dictation with transcription in the International Phonetic Alphabet and practice in dicti,on. Introduces corrective phonetics. Recommended for French majors. Required for French education majors. Prerequisite: FR 252 or equivalent. Three-year cycle.|
FR 281
French for Oral & Writ Prof I
Intensive review of French grammar, designed to increase students' proficiency in all language skills with particular attention to intermediate speaking and writing. Readings cover a range of topics including French culture, history, current affairs,, and literature. One course in FR 281 or FR 282 is required for French and French education majors. Prerequisites: FR 250 or 252 or equivalent.|
FR 282
French for Oral & Writ Prof II
Continuation of FR 281. One course in FR 281 or FR 282 is required for French and French education majors. Prerequisite: FR 250 or 252 or equivalent.|
FR 301
French Civilization
Introduces contemporary French society, enlightened by glimpses at France's rich history. A study of geography, politics, family life, immigration, art, music, literature, the current status of French feminism, and French media will help students de,fine and understand the multiple aspects of French identity. Required for French and French education majors. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FR 250 or 252, or equivalent. Spring, two-year cycle.|
FR 302
Topics in French Lit & Culture
In-depth examination of a French literary movement, literary theme or cultural topic. This course may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course taught in English. Assignment done in French for French, majors and minors. Prerequisite (only for French majors and minors): FR 250 or FR 252 or equivalent.|
FR 340
French Film
Surveys major French films with English subtitles, and provides an introduction to trends of French cinema. Emphasizes cultural differences between Francophone and Anglo-American cultures as revealed through film. Lectures in English; assignments i,n French. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor. Fall, annually.|
FR 341
Surv Fren Lit Mid Ages To 17c
Survey and discussion of the main trends of French thought and literary expression from the Middle Ages to the seventeenth century. This course emphasizes the emergence and evolution of literary genres.|
FR 342
Surv Fren Lit 18th Cent To Pr
Survey and discussion of the main trends of French thought and literary expression from the Age of Enlightenment to Postmodernity. This course emphasizes the concepts of experimentation with subversion of the established literary genres.|
FR 353
Development French Drama
Examines development of French drama from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 354
Develop Of French Novel
Study of the French novel, with selections from major works in the genre. Course conducted in French. Required for French and French education majors. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 356
Development Fr Poetry
Study of French poetry from the Middle Ages to modern times. Introduces poetic form, from the ballad to free verse. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 358
French Thinkers
Study of major French thinkers from the Middle Ages to the 20th century. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 360
Canadian Writers
Study of the major trends in French Canadian theatre, prose, and poetry. Course conducted in French. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 361
Black Writers French Lit
Study of the major trends in Francophone African literature. Includes selections from among the works of Jacques Roumain, Sembene Ousmane, Amadou Kourouma, Francis Bebey, Ferdinand Oyono, Leopold Sedar Senghor, Ame Cesaire, Leo Damas, Bernard DadiÄ,, and others. Lectures conducted in English; assignments in French for French majors or minors, in English for other students. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor. Spring, annually.|
FR 400
Sr Sem in Lit, Ling & Cult Stu
Explores in a seminar setting a comparative literary, cultural, linguistic or pedagogical topic, including primary sources and relevant theory and criticism. The course teaches analytical and writing skills relevant to cultural, linguistic and liter,ary analysis. A major paper or unit plan is required of all participants. Required of senior majors in World Languages and Cultures. Prerequisite: Senior status during semester of enrollment, at least one 300-level course in the Department of Mod,ern Languages and Cultures.|
FR 451
Readings: French Lit
Selected readings determined in relation to the needs and interests of the individual student. Prerequisite: FR 252 or permission of instructor.|
FR 501
Spec Topics French Lit & Cult
In-depth examination of contemporary French and Francophone literary and cultural issues. May be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course taught in French.|
FR 551
Adv Supr Readings In Fren Lit
Selected readings determined by the needs and interests of the individual student.|
FR 557
Adv Fren Ling & Cult Immersion
This course consists of two weeks of intensive online instruction on French culture and civilzation, prior to a two week trip to France. During this immersion period, students will visit places of historical and cultural interest in the country, rec,eive lectures on the historical, cultural, artistic and literary importance of the sites visited, and conduct as much of their daily routines in French as possible. Courses offered to graduate students.|
GEOG 100
Intro World Geography
Provides an overview of important human and physical characteristics of the world's cultural realms. Examines issues of economic and social development, and religions and cultures found around the world in a regional or systematic context. Explores c,ontemporary environmental, political, and ethnic/racial problems.|
GEOG 115
Conservation
Integrates the social and natural sciences by examining the concepts, methodologies and history of the Conservation of Natural Resources. Includes soil, water, land, forest, wildlife, energy, clean air, and historic resources. Explores the many contr,oversial issues surrounding the management of public lands and regulation of private land. Examines the rational and logic of federal and state environmental laws. Every fall or spring. (Values Flag.)|
GEOG 210
Fund of Digital Mapping
Introduces the basic knowledge required to work with digital maps. General and specialized online and desktop mapping options are discussed, and an introduction to the geo-spatial technologies, including Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Global P,ositioning Systems (GPS) and Remote Sensing is emphasized. The potential uses of those technologies in the areas such as environmental studies, forestry, marketing, demographics, and utilities are also presented.|
GEOG 225
Cartography I With Lab
Systematic study of basic concepts and components of thematic map-making. Emphasizes familiarization with and utilization of drafting instruments and equipment essential to map design and construction. Presents techniques of photographic reproduction, of student map projects. Two lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or consent of instructor. Offered annually.|
GEOG 244
Planning the Human Environment
The course introduces students to the theory and practice of urban and regional planning. Examines the means and ways of managing land resources with respect to enhancing the use of land for residential, commercial, industrial and agricultural purpos,es. The course focuses on comprehensive planning, planning strategies, planning analysis, regulatory systems and the preservation and conservation of land resources for future generations and for aesthetic purposes. The ecological implications of dev,elopment on natural resources is pivotal in the course in order to explain and analyze growth management practices in urban and rural communities. Offered occasionally.|
GEOG 257
U.S. & Canada
Analyzes geographic problems, natural and cultural, of the United States and Canada; the synthesis of physical, biotic, economic, and social patterns and problems of geographic regions of North America; the interrelationship of North American politic,al structures and their ties with the rest of the world. Each semester.|
GEOG 260
Economic Geog
Explores the production, exchange, and use of the basic commodities of the world; the relationship between the physical factors and economic conditions and the patterns of major economic activities, world trade, and trade routes; economic landscapes;, problems of economic development. Recommended for majors in economics, history, and political science. Every other year.|
GEOG 300
Special Topics
Topics of special interest in various areas of physical, human, or regional geography. Professor selects format most suitable to the study. Enrollment by consent of the instructor. Offered occasionally.|
GEOG 310
Sustainable Development
Examines the commonalities developing countries have faced and continue to face in their push toward development, particularly as they relate to the spatial aspects affecting the conditions of the development process. Analyzes theories of growth and,social and economic development, as well as the historical and contemporary relationship between the developed and the developing world. Discusses issues such as population growth and human settlement patterns, the rural/urban dichotomy, industrializ,ation and urbanization, regional trading blocks, transportation and development, and the socio-economic development planning. Examines the impact of cultural elements such as religion and the role of women in development. Writing intensive course. Pr|
GEOG 315
Human Geog:Race,Class,Ge
Focuses on methods and theories geographers have used to explore how social relations of race, class, and gender have been structured, influenced, and expressed spatially. Exposes students to social/spatial construction theories (the social construct,ion of race and gender, the social production of space, and the role of space in the construction of gender and race), and postmodern economic restructuring and its impact on the location and (race, class, and gender component of the) employment stru,cture of flexible industries. Explores contemporary theories on the role of race/gender and class intersection in the reproduction process, and the colonial and postcolonial geographies of gender and race. Writing intensive course. Prerequisite: None|
GEOG 325
Cartography II With Lab
A systematic study of the new dimensions of cartography in use today. Emphasizes the techniques used in the construction of three-dimensional maps and models of statistical surfaces, diagrams, cartograms, negative scribing, and color separation. Two,lectures and three hours of laboratory weekly. Prerequisites: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Every other year.|
GEOG 345
Computer Cartog w/Lab
Systematic study of the newest dimension of cartography in use today. Designing and constructing computer maps is an integral part of the course. Students create computer maps with a number of programs, including Atlas Graphics, Atlas Draw, Microam,,Map Info. PC Globe, PS USA, Systate, etc. Introduces the use of the digitizer. Prerequisite CIS 110 or equivalent course, or consent of the instructor. Every other spring.|
GEOG 358
Geography Of The Caribbean
Study of the Caribbean, with a special tour on the geography and the cultural and socio-economic aspects of the Caribbean. Emphasizes socio-economic history of slavery and the plantation economy, including issues of race relations and their spatial d,imensions. Traces the economic transition away from the plantation economy, the rise of an active black leadership, urbanization and urban planning in the region, attempts at economic and political regional integration, economic development strategie,s of small Caribbean islands, and the impact of tourism as the new mono culture of the region. Offered occasionally.|
GEOG 385
Climatology
Examines the major components of climate and climate change. Analyzes physical aspects of the atmosphere as a series of long-term weather phenomena. Studies regional characteristics of climate on the basis of worldwide weather patterns. Emphasizes, how applied aspects of climate demonstrate the interrelationships and importance of both physical and regional climatology to humankind. Also examines the causes of long-term climate change and variability. Acceptable for social science or natural, science credits. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or higher.|
GEOG 400
Intro Remote Sensing/Lab
Explores aerial photographs for geographic investigation of physical and cultural features of the landscape; the application of remote sensing to topographic and planimetric map construction, agricultural and land use identification, landform study,,and forestry. Each Fall Semester.|
GEOG 404
Soils With Lab
Comprehensively examines the classification, formation, and interpretation of soils. Students examine the processes of soil classification (both the zonal classification and the soil taxonomy classification), soil formation (parent material, climate,, slope, time and organic activity), and the interpretation of pedogenic sequences (as it relates to deposition, diagenesis, and climate change). Laboratory (one credit, two hours) complements lecture portion of the course. Emphasizes the field interp,retation of soils as well as the geochemistry and textual classification of soils. Prerequisites: ES 150 and 255 or permission of the instructor.|
GEOG 425
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Examines satellite-based earth imaging instruments, data sources, and products, and their applications to land use management, geologic assessments, agriculture, forestry, soil resources, archeology, meteorology, and oceanography. Utilizes visual and, digital data. Prerequisite: GEOG 400 (can be waived by permission of instructor). Every Spring.|
GEOG 450
Field Geography w/Lab
Explores techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn the techniques and procedures of rural and urban land use, surveying, and field research. Prerequisites: c,onsent of instructor. Summer on demand.|
GEOG 460
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
GEOG 470
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. These include an entire sequence of build,ing spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 (can be waived by instructor),. Fall, annually.|
GEOG 481
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
GEOG 490
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem solving in applied settings. Lecture and application-/project-based. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduce stud,ents to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 470. Each Spring Semester.|
GEOG 499
Sem: Meth In Geog Resear
Presents the opportunity for students with considerable interest and background in geography to utilize the various methods of analysis of the discipline to examine a concrete issue or research problem. Emphasizes analysis, synthesis, and communicati,on. Students produce a written report and give an oral presentation of their project. Prerequisites: Junior or senior status in geography or permission of instructor. Every other spring.|
GEOG 500
Intro Arphoto Int Rem Sens
Study and assessment of the physical and cultural features of the earth using satellite images and aerial photographs. Uses black and white photos, color infrared photos, and digital satellite images for planimetric map construction, agricultural and, vegetation studies, landform identification, land use assessment, and forestry. Laboratory activities include analysis of imagery in different zones of the electromagnetic spectrum, geometric correction of satellite images, and computer-assisted lan,d cover classification. Prerequisite: GEOG 125 or permission of instructor. Fall semester.|
GEOG 525
Adv Remote Sensing w/Lab
Builds on the content of Introduction to Air Photo Interpretation and Remote Sensing. Uses Earth imaging satellites, such as Lansat, SPOT, and Ikonos, and introduces new instruments, including Radarsat, Space Shuttle, and Space Station earth imagine,instruments. Examines various digital data sets including digital elevation models (DEMS), digital orthophotos and digital topographic maps. Students will work together on a drainage basin study to assess the sources of acid pollution using computer-,assisted land cover classification, manual photo interpretation, and field reconnaissance to identify trip mine areas and acid discharging oil/gas wells. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 500. Spring, annually.|
GEOG 550
Field Geography w/Lab
Systematic study of techniques essential to geographic field investigation. Emphasizes practical, first-hand experiences in the field where students learn techniques and procedures of compass traversing, plane tabling, rural and urban land use survey,ing, and field research. Prerequisite: Cartography I and consent of instructor. Offered occasionally.|
GEOG 560
Geospatial Data Handle & Integ
This course concentrates on how geographic data can be compiled from different sources into a GIS project. This includes geo-referencing scanned paper maps, translating the real-world into a geographic database, digitization of vector features, edit,ing attribute data, working with and integrating GIS data available from different online sources, and manipulating metadata.|
GEOG 570
Intro Geog Info Systems
Addresses basic concepts and principles of geographic information systems, data models, data structures, applications, and technical issues. Lab focuses on how these basic principles are implemented in a GIS. Lab includes an entire sequence of buildi,ng spatial database: data capturing, editing, adding attributes, building topography, registering layers to real-world coordinates, making map compositions, data conversion, and basic analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 345 or permission of instructor. F,all, annually.|
GEOG 581
Spatial Analysis & Modeling
This course builds upon previous knowledge of GIS vector and raster data model handling. It concentrates on the use of those spatial data in analyzing different environmental phenomenon. It emphasizes how to derive new information from existing dat,a, and handling them through interpolation methods and raster calculations. It will also involve the extraction of new knowledge in support of a decision making process through cell-based operations in an automated fashion using scripting and modeli,ng techniques.|
GEOG 590
Adv Geog Info Sys w/Lab
Provides students with the ability to apply GIS for spatial problem-solving in applied setting. Lecture- and application/project-based course. Lecture covers spatial modeling and analysis based on a raster data structure. Laboratory sessions introduc,e students to three-dimensional surface modeling, cost-distance analysis, runoff modeling, and diffusion analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG/ES 570. Spring, annually.|
GER 1
German Elective I
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GER 2
German Elective II
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GER 3
German Elective III
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GER 4
German Elective IV
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GER 100
Intro Germ German
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GER 101
Special Topics
Experts on individual countries cover historical and contemporary developments on the European intellectual scene with regard to their relevance for the present American student generation. The special subject is announced at pre-registration. Open,to all students, and may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course conducted in English. No prerequisite.|
GER 103
Ger Civilization & Cult
Introduces the geography, history, government, literature, and arts of German-speaking countries (Germany, Switzerland and Austria). Emphasizes comparison of the cultures and values of German societies to those of Anglo-American society. Conducted in, English. No prerequisite.|
GER 109
Germ Lit In Trans
Examines representative German literary works, emphasizing the characters and ideas that have influenced both German literature and the literature of other countries. Conducted in English. No prerequisite.|
GER 140
German Film
Surveys major German films with English subtitles. Through film, students learn about cultural and social changes in 20th-century German-speaking countries and become aware of differences between German and Anglo-American cultures. Conducted in Engli,sh. No prerequisite.|
GER 150
Intensive Elem Ger I
Equivalent to GER 151 and GER 152.|
GER 151
Elementary German I
Introduces the German language, emphasizing all language skills--listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Fall, annually.|
GER 152
Elementary German II
Continuation of GER 151. Prerequisite: GER 151 or equivalent. Spring, annually.|
GER 250
Intensive Inter Ger II
Equivalent to GER 251 and 252 combined. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
GER 251
Intermed German I (German III)
Continuation of GER 152, with greater emphasis on reading and writing. Prerequisite: GER 150 or 152, or equivalent. Fall, annually.|
GER 252
Interm German II (German IV)
Continuation of GER 251. Prerequisite: GER 251 or equivalent. Spring, annually.|
GER 254
Business German
A study of the language needed to conduct common business transactions, and discuss financial and technological matters in German. Requires writing of business letters and reports in German. Emphasizes cultural differences between German and American, business practices. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
GER 255
German Civ I
Introduces German society, enlightened by glimpses at Germany's rich history. A study of German geography, politics, family life, immigration, art, education, music, literature, and media helps students define and understand the multiple aspects of G,erman identity. Conducted in German. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
GER 256
Germanic Civ II
A complement to German 255, with greater emphasis on Germany's past.|
GER 257
German Immersion
This course, offered in Germany, will introduce students to German culture, including aspects of everyday life in Germany, as well as facilitate understanding of Germany's history and civilization through study of important monuments and urban design,. Prerequisite: GER 252 or permission of instructor. Pre-session, annually.|
GER 260
The German Short Story
Study of German short stories from the turn of the 19th century to the present. All readings, discussions, and assignments in German. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
GER 265
Inter Conversation
Practice creative language use in conversation to develop oral proficiency. May be substituted for GER 252 with permission of instructor. Prerequisite: GER 251 or equivalent.|
GER 270
Intro To German Phoe & Pronun
Introduces the German phonetic system, including the study of phonemes, intonation, stress, and rhythm. Intensive aural/oral training through phonetic dictation with transcription in the International Phonetic Alphabet and practice in diction. Introd,uces corrective phonetics. Prerequisite: GER 252 or equivalent.|
GER 302
Topics in German Lit & Culture
In-depth examination of a German literary movements, literary theme or cultural topic. This course may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course taught in English. Assignments done in German for Germ,an majors and minors. Prerequisite (only for German majors and minors): GER 251 or GER 250.|
GER 307
German Conv & Comp I
Develops students' abilities in listening, speaking and writing German. This course emphasizes a variety of issues relating to modern Germany. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252.|
GER 308
German Conv & Comp II
Continuation of GER 307. Prerequisite: GER 307 or permission of instructor|
GER 340
German Film
Surveys major German films with English subtitles. Through film, students learn about cultural and social changes in 20th-century German-speaking countries and become aware of differences between German and Anglo-American cultures. Lectures in Englis,h; assignments in German. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252, or equivalent.|
GER 341
Surv Germ Lit Mid Ages To 18th
Survey and discussion of the main trends of German thought and literary expression from the Middle Ages through the Classical period. This course emphasizes the emergence and evolution of literary genres. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252.|
GER 342
Surv Germ Lit 19th Cen To Pres
Survey and discussion of the main trends of German thought and literary expression from German Romanticism to Postmodernity. This course emphasizes the concepts of experimentation with and subversion of the established literary genres. Prerequisite,: GER 250 or 252.|
GER 353
Modern German Drama
German drama from the middle of the 19th century to the present, covering representative writers of the realist, naturalist, and expressionist movements, as well as selected contemporary writers. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252 or permission of instruct,or.|
GER 355
German Romanticism
Study of German Romantic literature and philosophy, with consideration of their influences on American Romanticism. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252 or permission of instructor.|
GER 358
Classical German Lit
Study of major authors and representative works from the golden age of German literature. Prerequisite: GER 250 or 252 or permission of instructor.|
GER 400
Sr Sem in Lit, Ling & Cult Stu
Explores in a seminar setting a comparative literary, cultural, linguistic or pedagogical topic, including primary sources and relevant theory and criticism. The course teaches analytical and writing skills relevant to cultural, linguistic and liter,ary analysis. A major paper or unit plan is required of all participants. Required of senior majors in World Languages and Cultures. Prerequisite: Senior status during semester of enrollment, at least one 300-level course in the Department of Mod,ern Languages and Cultures.|
GER 451
Readings: German Lit
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GER 501
Spec Topics German Lit & Cult
In-depth examination of contemporary German literary and cultural issues. May be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course taught in German.|
GER 551
Adv Supr Readings In Germ Lit
Selected readings determined by the needs and interests of the individual student.|
GER 557
Adv Germ Ling & Cult Immersion
This course consists of two weeks of intensive online instruction on German culture and civilization, prior to a two week trip to a German-speaking country. During this immersion period, students will visit places of historical =, cultural, artistic,, and literary importance of the sites visited, and conduct as much of their daily routines in German as possible. Course offered to graduate students.|
GERO 499
Seminar In Gerontology
Integrate knowledge and hands-on experience obtained in a field setting. Conducted as a seminar in which students share their experiences and do problem solving. The instructor facilitates this process and provides information to enhance learning., Co-requisite: REHB 495, SOC 499, or PSY 499.|
GS 109
Foreign Lit And Trans
Offered by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures, listed as FR 109, GER 109, or SPAN 109.|
GS 123
Intro-Locating Inf
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GS 140
Pers Money Mgmt & Cons Econ
Examines major aspects of personal financial management, including budgeting of income and expenditures, transactions, and relations with banks and other lending institutions, insurance and retirement plans, home ownership, personal taxes, savings, a,nd investment plans. B.S.B.A. majors may apply this course only as a free elective. Each semester.|
GS 222
Problem Solving
Investigates the elements of solving a variety of problems, beginning with closed problems such as puzzles or cryptograms and progressing through simple games and complex games to the complexities of open-ended problems of personal and political life,. Emphasizes development of proficiency in dealing with new situations and techniques through actual practice. No prerequisite. Each semester.|
GS 230
Special Topics
Experts on individual countries cover historical and contemporary developments on the European intellectual scene with regard to their relevance for the present American student generation. The special subject is announced at pre-registration. Open,to all students, and may be taken up to three times for credit, provided that different topics are offered. Course conducted in English. No prerequisite.|
GS 242
You And The Law
Surveys the major fields of law. Emphasizes historical development, basic legal principles, legal theory and procedure, and their relation to the individual. Business administration majors may not take this course. Annually.|
GS 262
Intro To Serv Learning
Provides an overview of service learning. Presents history, legislation, and theory relevant to service in addition to the components and standards of service learning. Students will be prepared for service through readings in the subject area, sensi,tivity training, conflict resolution, and etiquette. Students will then spend 30 hours in community-based service activity at three of five priority sites. Students will reflect in writing upon their service and will attend weekly seminars. Prerequis,ite: ENG 110. On demand.|
GS 411
Science And Society
Describes the process of science as an ongoing and continuously developing means of describing the natural world. Examines what science is and how it is done. Promotes science literacy. Emphasizes written and oral communication skills as well as the,ability to understand important topics in science, along with the policy and ethical questions raised. Open to students in all academic areas.|
GU 160
Intro To Global Understanding
Introduces students to global perspectives that shape how we facilitate and coordinate interactions with people from different backgrounds through the use of verbal and nonverbal codes.|
GU 340
Global Understanding Seminar
Capstone course for the Minor in Global Understanding. Interdisciplinary seminar focused on the development of a research project to be implemented during a subsequent approved experience abroad. Students will identify a topic for their research pr,oject, develop a well-articulated prospectus and literature survey, and link with and secure the participation of a faculty advisor with whom they will work on this project. Prerequisite: GU 160|
GU 341
Global Understanding Res Proj
Under the supervision of a faculty advisor in their major area of study, students pursue a reseach project (defined in a proposal written as part of GU 340 - Seminar in Global Understanding) while on an approved experience abroad. The final products, of this research are a paper and oral presentation. Prerequisite: GU 340|
HIST 110
Com Hist Of Civ In Asia
Explores an overview of all of Asian history from the birth of civilization to the present. Emphasizes identification of a number of significant stages of historical development in the life of civilizations. Clarifies the socio-cultural subdivisions,within Asia. On demand.|
HIST 111
Ancient & Med Civ
Includes a survey of prehistoric cultures and civilization from its historical beginning to 1300. Presents a knowledge of the origins of the broad social, political, intellectual, and economic movements of the past from which the student may gain an,understanding of civilization today. Each semester.|
HIST 112
Early Modern Civ
A study of significant movements and events from 1300 to 1815. Emphasizes the interrelationships between cultures of various world regions. Stresses the influence of European development on other world areas. Each semester.|
HIST 113
Modern Civilization
A study of significant movements and events of 1789 to the present. Emphasizes interrelationships between the cultures of various world regions, with major attention on the influence European development has exerted on other world areas in the 19th a,nd 20th centuries. Each semester.|
HIST 120
U S To 1877
Surveys United States history from the period of exploration through the Reconstruction period. Each semester.|
HIST 121
U S Since 1877
Surveys United States history from Reconstruction to the present. Each semester.|
HIST 130
Africa To 1800
Explores the history of Africa and its people from ancient times through the Atlantic slave trade. Emphasizes understanding the impact of cultural/ethnic diversity on the development of this history. Examines historical questions concerning the early, record, migration, African kingdoms, trade and economy, impact of Islam on Africa, the European Age of Discovery, and the effects of the Atlantic slave trade upon African societies. On demand.|
HIST 131
Africa Since 1800
Explores the history of Africa and its people from the end of the Atlantic slave trade to the modern period. Includes the expansion of European influence on Africa during the 19th century, the partition of Africa, the many forms of African resistance, to European rule, the impact of the colonial era, African nationalism and independence struggles, and the challenges facing independent African states. On demand.|
HIST 215
Topics In History
Topical approach to the study of history, permitting students to pursue an in-depth examination of selected problems. Introductory level. On demand.|
HIST 217
History Of West Africa
Examines the history of West Africa from 800 A.D. to the present. Includes the introduction of Islam to West Africa; the internal factors which transformed local societies, states, and empires; the impact of European trade and imperialism; forms of r,esistance to colonial rule; the rise of nationalism and the struggle for independence; and the challenges of the post-independence period.|
HIST 254
Lat Amer Col Per
Surveys the development of Colonial Latin America from its discovery to 1825. Analyzes economic, social, political, and cultural development. Fall, alternate years.|
HIST 255
Lat Amer Nat Per
Emphasizes the history of the Latin American countries since 1825. Analyzes economic, social, political, and cultural development. Fall, alternate years.|
HIST 260
Nazism, Hitler & Holocas
Examines the Nazi Party from its beginnings in 1919, its gestation in the Weimar Republic period, and its supremacy in Germany, from 1933 to the end of World War II. Includes an examination of the social and intellectual background of Nazism. Emphasi,zes the personalities of the Third Reich leadership. Concludes with an examination of the Holocaust. Spring, annually.|
HIST 275
India Thru Ages
Examines the historical development of Indian civilization from its early origins to the coming of the Europeans. Emphasizes the classical period, religion, social organizations, and the ancient Hindu and medieval Muslim periods. Spring, alternate ye,ars.|
HIST 286
Mod China And Japan
Study of the transformation that has taken place in China and Japan in modern times as a result of an external impact as well as forces within Far Eastern societies. Spring, alternate years.|
HIST 298
Historical Methods
Introduces the research methods, utilization of historical sources, documentation, and writing skills necessary to complete a significant historical research project. Skills mastered in this course should enable students to improve the quality of all, writing and research required in all 300-level courses offered in the History Department. Focuses on American, European, or non-Western civilization, depending upon the instructor. Permission of instructor required. Required for all history majors.,Spring, annually.|
HIST 302
Women In The U.S.
Explores the history of American women from Colonial times to the present. Examines women's diverse experiences and roles, the relationship between women and the rest of society, gender expectations, 19th and 20th century feminism, reform and politi,cal activiites. Prerequiste: Sophomore standing. Alternate years.|
HIST 303
History Of Mexico
A history of Mexico from pre-Columbian times to the present. Emphasizes the rise and fall of advanced ancient civilizations, European conquest and colonialism, the struggle for independence, Mexico's social revolution, the rise of nationalism, and th,e current drive for modernization in the so-called Third World. No prerequisite. Spring, alternate years.|
HIST 304
Religio & Soc in Latin America
This course will examine Latin American religious traditions from the 15th century to the present. We will explore such themes as gender, indigenous resistance, church-state relations, and social movements. The course begins with an investigation of, pre-Columbian practices and the impact of European conquest and colonization on belief systems. This course also examines the influence of religious ideologies on colonial law, gender relations, early 19th century independence movements and 20th cen,tury revolutions. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or permission of instructor.|
HIST 305
Hist S Africa Since 1800
Examines the growth of the European population of the Cape Colony; Shaka's Zulu empire; the Great Trek of the Boers; the creation of new states; the discovery of gold and diamonds; the creation of modern South Africa, Lesotho, Swaziland, and Botswana,; the rise and fall of apartheid; and regional conflicts.|
HIST 310
Africa, Slavery & Trade
Explores the history of slavery within Africa from its origins to its end. Draws on recent historical and anthropological research to investigate such topics as links between internal slavery and the external slave trades; processes of enslavement; t,he positions and roles of slaves in African societies; the ideology of slavery; slave trading networks and markets within Africa; the effects of slavery on specific African societies; resistance to slavery; and the long-term consequences of slavery.,Fall Semester.|
HIST 312
Native American History
This course will examine the history of Native American societies from pre-contact to the present, focusing on the past and present diversity of Indian peoples. The course will examine indigenous social structures, languages, and religions. In addit,ion, the course will discuss historic changes in Indian societies as a result of contact with Europeans and Africans and their descendants. In the colonial period, topics covered will include first-contact situations, warfare, disease, and diplomacy,. Later topics will include nineteenth- and twentieth-century debates over education, assimilation, economic development, and sovereignty. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or 121. Fall or spring, alternate years.|
HIST 315
Topics In History
This course introduces students to new themes in the history of one of America's most tumultuous decades, the 1920's. From the end of World War One through the onset of the Great Depression, students examine the origins of modern America through a fo,cus on such topics as rebellious youth, feminism, and the Harlem Renaissance, as well as reactionary mindsets represented by the KKK. religious fundamentalists, and Prohibition.|
HIST 318
Ancient Greece
Examines development of ancient Greece from its earliest precursors in Mycenaean civilization, through the growth of the city-states of classical Greece, to its blending with other cultures in the Hellenistic World. Addresses political, social, and c,ultural developments, historical problems, and the historical narrative. Fall, alternate years.|
HIST 319
Roman History
Examines development of Rome from its foundation as a city-state in central Italy in the mid-eighth century B.C. to its conquest of the Mediterranean World as a republic and finally to the end of the Roman Empire in the West in the fifth century A.D., Addresses political, social, and cultural changes and will be historiographic as well as historic in outlook. Spring, alternate years.|
HIST 320
Medieval History
Surveys European development from 500 to 1300. Alternate falls.|
HIST 330
Eur Dur Renaiss & Reform
A study of the Renaissance and Reformation emphasizing the important political, social, economic, religious, and cultural forces that emerged during this period of transition and ushered in modern western culture. Emphasizes the evolution of modern s,tates, the rise of individualism, and the development of modern religious ideas and institutions.|
HIST 345
Europe 1815-1924
A study of the social, economic, political, religious, and cultural experiences of the European people from the Congress of Vienna to the death of Lenin. On demand.|
HIST 349
The American West
Study of the Old West of the 19th century and the West as a distinctive region in the 20th century. Emphasizes the continuing relationship to the East and on the geographic, economic, and cultural diversity within the West itself. Pioneers from the E,ast, Native Americas, immigrants from Europe, Mexico, and Asia, farmers, cowboys, and entrepreneurs will all have a place in the course. Romanticized myths of the West will be compared with historical realities. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or consent of t,he instructor. Fall Semester.|
HIST 350
Colonial America
A study of colonial history beginning with the European background of colonization and continuing through the American Revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or consent of instructor.|
HIST 351
US: The Early Republic
A study of the Federalist Era, Jeffersonian and Jacksonian America. Examines the formation of the republic through the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian revolution, and the age of Jackson. Analyzes the ideas and personalities that shaped the nat,ion. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or consent of instructor.|
HIST 352
Civil War & Reconstruct
A basic study of the growth of sectional differences between North and South from 1820 to 1850. Examines the failure of compromise efforts in the 1850s and the causes of secession. The war and the consequences of reconstruction policies to 1877 are t,raced in light of modern civil rights problems. Fall, alternate years. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or permission of Instructor.|
HIST 353
Us - Age Of Reform
A detailed look at the gilded age, populist, and progressive periods in American history. Examines the reform phenomena that characterized the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Emphasizes the motivation, objectives, accomplishments, and failures of, the various reform movements. Considers each reform group in the context of a period of rapid social and economic change. Prerequisite: HIST 121 or consent of instructor.|
HIST 357
Tudor/Stuart Engl
Examines the significant political, cultural, social, and religious developments in England from the accession of Henry VII to the death of Queen Anne and the transition to the House of Hanover. Spring, alternate years.|
HIST 363
Hist Of American Labor
Examines the history of American working men and women from the colonial period to the present. Explores the growth of the trade union movement and its socio-political and economic impact, and the nature of the work performed by labor and the way lab,oring people have lived. On demand.|
HIST 366
Russia Since 1815
Examines Russia's development during the 19th and 20th centuries. First part of course focuses on Russia and its people under the czar and the drift to revolution. Second part of course focuses on Soviet society and communism in theory and practice.|
HIST 367
Comparative Slavery
Introduces students to the history and diverse nature of slavery in North America and the Caribbean. Students analyze how the institution of slavery changed over time and differed by geographic region. Includes origins of the Atlantic slave trade and, the Caribbean's central role, interstate slave trade, slave cultures and communities, differences between rural and urban slavery, slave hiring, slaveholding by free people of color, and interlocked relationships between white people and people of c,olor. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or permission of instructor. Alternate years.|
HIST 369
African-Amer Hist 1865 To Pres
A survey of African-American history from 1865 to the present, with an emphasis on the evolving role of black people in the political, economic, social, and cultural development of the U.S. This course includes a close examination of the junctures i,n American history where the struggle to improve African-American life took on new meaning for society at large.|
HIST 370
History Of Mid East
Study of the early classical era by way of an advanced intensive exploration of the civilization in the Mediterranean East and Middle East. Introduces the religion of Judaism and Christianity in their political setting, and examines the cultural cont,ributions of the Semites, Greeks, and Romans. Stresses the Islamic age. Emphasizes modern identification of the countries that make this an explosive part of the world--Jordan, Israel, Lebanon, Iran, Iraq, Arabia, Syria, Egypt - and their relationshi,p to the great powers. On demand.|
HIST 371
Am Popular Cult, 1865-Pres
This course examines popular culture in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, focusing specifically on its relationship to consumption, leisure, politics, race, class, gender, social movements, celebrity, and the corporate world. Topics are dr,awn from varied arenas of popular culture including sports, film, literature, art, theater music, photography, tourism, amusement venues, and advertising, among others. Prerequisite: HIST 121. Fall or Spring, alternate years.|
HIST 372
The American Revolution
This course provides undergraduates with a detailed narrative of the American Revolution. It evaluates the causes and consequences of the colonial rebellion against the British Empire in North America, and assesses the preconditions, constraints, an,d outcomes of the struggle for independence. Particular attention is given to the clash of values, interests, and ambitions that transformed the thirteen colonies into the United States. Moreover, significant themes of cultural, economic, military,, diplomatic, and political conflict are explored. Prerequisite: HIST 120. Fall or spring, alternate years.|
HIST 388
U.S. 1920 - 1960
This course surveys the principle social, political, cultural, and economic developments in American Society from 1920 to 1960. Topics include: social tensions and social conflicts during the 1920s; the impact of the Great Depression and the signifi,cance of the New Deal; isolationism and internationalism; America during World War II; the Cold War; McCarthyism; the Rise of the Civil Rights Movement; and the Affluent Society.|
HIST 389
U.S. 1960 To The Present
This course introduces students to the political, economic, social, and cultural forces that shaped America from 1960 to the present. Topics include John Kennedy and the New Frontier; Lyndon Johnson and the Great Society; the modern civil rights mov,ement; American involvement in Vietnam; the counterculture; Richard Nixon and Watergate; the end of the Cold War; the feminist and environmental movements; the New Right of the 19080s and the New Liberalism of the 1990s; and the Gulf War and war on t,errorism, among others.|
HIST 398
Quant Meth For Historian
Applies statistical techniques to historical research. Students briefly review basic statistical techniques; investigate, in depth, the application of statistical manipulation to historical data; and explore current historical research employing thes,e methods. Introduces students to computer applications of statistics through a social science software package in a hands-on lab. Focuses on the capabilities, appropriateness, and limitations of quantitative methods within the historical discipline., Prerequisite: CIS 217 and PSY 230 or ECON 221 or MATH 221 or 222.|
HIST 402
Independent Studies
Variable credit course gives students the opportunity to explore an area of special interest in history not covered by existing courses through field experience or independent study. Focus can be an historical topic and/or the development of skills t,hat aid historical research. Prior to enrolling in the course, students must develop a study plan in conjunction with the faculty member willing to serve as supervisor. The student will work under the direction of an appropriate faculty member. Credi,t will be given only when the project has been completed to the satisfaction of the project advisor. On demand.|
HIST 410
Historiography
Introduces historical method and theory. Explores a variety of interpretive theories and specialized approaches employed by contemporary historians to traditional and non-traditional problems. Emphasizes development of the student's critical abilitie,s. Permission of instructor required. Fall, annually.|
HIST 432
Vietnam War
This course examines U.S. involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to the present, with a primary focus on the Vietnam War and its political, economic, social, and cultural impact upon American society. Topics covered include the roots of Vietnamese revolut,ionary thought , the rise of Ho Chi Minh and communism in Vietnam, the French-Indochina War, U.S. military engagements from 1965 through 1973, the political and cultural antiwar movement in America, the peace accords, and the aftermath of the conflic,t, among others.|
HIST 460
Hist Of Religion In The U.S.
A study of American religious history from the colonial period to the present. Examines the histories of individual religious institutions and their interaction within their social and intellectual context, focusing upon the paradox of mainstream Ame,rican Protestantism within a pluralistic religious culture. Prerequisite: HIST 120 or permission of instructor. On demand.|
HIST 481
France: 1483-1715
Examines the significant political, cultural, social and religious developments in France from the accession of Charles VIII to the death of Louis XIV. No prerequisite. Alternate years.|
HIST 511
Sem In Anc & Medieval Europe
Survey of major historical problems in the history of ancient and medieval Europe (c. 3000 B.C.E.?1300 C.E.). Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will write an in-depth p,aper or lesson plan. Course may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 512
Seminar In Early Modern Europe
Survey of major historical problems in the history of early modern Europe (1300?1789). Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will write an in-depth paper or lesson plan. Co,urse may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 513
Seminar In Modern Europe
Survey of major historical problems in the history of modern Europe (1789?present). Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will write an in-depth paper or lesson plan. Cours,e may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 520
Seminar In U.S. Hist To 1877
Survey of major historical problems in the history of the United States from colonial times to 1877. Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will write an in-depth paper or,lesson plan. Course may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 521
Sem In U.S. History Since 1877
Survey of major historical problems in the history of the United States from 1877 to the present. Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will write an in-depth paper or les,son plan. Course may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 530
Non-Western History
Survey of major historical problems in the the area of African, Asian, or Latin American history (depending on the instructor). Much attention devoted to historiographic problems in secondary scholarship as well as to primary sources. Students will,write an in-depth paper or lesson plan. Course may be taken twice (with consent of instructor).|
HIST 532
Vietnam War
This course examines U.S. involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to the present, with a primary focus on the Vietnam War and its political, economic, social, and cultural impact upon American society. Topics covered include the roots of Vietnamese revolut,ionary thought, the rise of Ho Chi Minh and communism in Vietnam, the French-Indochina War, U.S. military engagements from 1965 through 1973, the political and cultural antiwar movement in America, the peace accords, and the aftermath of the conflict,, among others. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing or permission of instsructor|
HIST 562
The Holocaust
Explores the social policy of Nazi Germany as it was applied to various minority groups. Includes an examination of the evolution of the concentration camp from political prisons to death factories. Special attention is paid to the experience of th,e Jewish victims.|
HIST 700
Thesis
Independent research project on an approved topic supervised by a faculty member. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. On demand.|
HON 125
Modes of Discourse
Interdisciplinary course integrates the student's production of both written and spoken discourse. Alternative method of teaching communication draws upon the skills of instructors from English and Speech, Communication & Theatre. Taken by freshman e,nrolled in the Honors Program, and will replace ENG 111 and SCT 113. (Not open to students who have taken ENG 111 or SCT 113.)|
HON 128
Modes of Discourse
An interdisciplinary course which aims to integrate the student's production of both written and spoken discourse. This course is an alternative method of teaching communication, and draws upon the skills of instructors from English and Speech Commu,nication. Taken by freshmen enrolled in the Honors Program, this course replaces both ENG 111 and SC 113. (Not open to students who have taken ENG 111 or SC 113.)|
HON 129
Modes of Discourse
An interdisciplinary course which aims to integrate the student's production of both written and spoken discourse. This course is an alternative method of teaching communication, and draws upon the skills of instructors from English and Speech Commu,nication. Taken by freshmen enrolled in the Honors Program, this course replaces both ENG 111 and SC 113. (Not open to students who have taken ENG 111 or SC 113.)|
HON 130
Spec Topics: Arts & Humanities
This Interdisciplinary course in the humanities is required of students enrolled in the Honors Program. Focuses is on human values, beliefs, and accomplishments as expressed in art, music, literature, philosophy, and religion.|
HON 131
Classic Works Requirement
This interdisciplinary course is designed as an alternative humanities offering to HON 130. Students must fulfill a requirement of attendance of music, dance, theatre, and film events, as well as a literature component. Course will be offered on an, as needed basis.|
HON 230
Speci Topics: Sci/Math
Interdisciplinary course in the natural sciences and/or mathematics. Focuses on basic principles in the natural sciences and/or mathematics and their development within the context of human civilization. Required of students in the Honors Program.|
HON 240
Spec Topics: Soc Sci
Interdisciplinary course in the social sciences. Focuses on human civilization from the perspective of the social scientist. Required of students enrolled in the Honors Program.|
HON 280
Special Topics
|
HON 350
Junior Seminar
An interdisciplinary seminar foundational to the development of the Senior Project and career planning. It is crucial in bridging the Honors sequence with the final project as it develops presentation and portfolio skills while requiring students to, develop the prospectus for their senior project and linking with a faculty mentor. This course and/or study abroad required of all students in the Honors Program.|
HON 430
Special Topics
Focuses on a topic of interest to honors students.|
HON 450
Senior Project
A scholarly project of an interdisciplinary nature including the student's major area of study. A public presentation of the outcome of the project is required. Required of all students in the Honors Program.|
HPE 101
Special Topics
|
HPE 105
Tai Chi for Fitness
Students have the opportunity to increase their fitness level through the low impact exercises that Tai Chi can offer. The course enables students to learn exercises that they can perform throughout their life with no need of eqipment.|
HPE 111
Health Education
Focuses on wellness and health promotion. Emphasizes healthy behaviors in each of the five Dimensions of Health (mental, physical, social, emotional, environmental). Stresses skills and application of health knowledge for optimum wellness and disease, prevention. Requirement for all students.|
HPE 120
Child Care Health Advocate
Ensuring the health and safety of children is a fundamental component of an early childhood program. This course emphasizes the promotion of the health and safety of children, including recognizing and correcting health and safety problems. This cour,se focuses on best practices in health safety and nutrition for young children.|
HPE 121
Walking For Fitness
Develop cardiorespiratory endurance through vigorous walking within individual target heart rate guidelines. Covers physical fitness principles, heart risk factors, body composition, and nutrition.|
HPE 123
Relaxation Skills
Provides experience and learning in psychophysiological regulation skills, which may significantly enhance fitness and wellness. Skeletal and visceral muscle relaxation, proper breathing technique, and flexibility are the major foci for the course., Students will learn these skills through the exercise provided in the methodologies of Diaphragmatic breathing, Meditation Progressive Relaxation, Yoga, Pilates, and Autogenic Training. Students will learn feedback and assessment measures using Bio,feedback Tools.|
HPE 125
Intro To Bicycling
Emphasizes proper fit of bike to rider, skills, and techniques of riding, basic bike maintenance, and aerobic fitness. Bicycles provided, helmet required. Each semester.|
HPE 131
Beginning Swimming
For students who cannot swim one length of the pool. Consists of drown-proofing and elementary back, breast, and freestyle strokes.|
HPE 132
Fitnes thr Pilates & Stab Ball
Students have the opportunity to increase their fitness level through strengthening their core muscles and improving their lean body mass. The course enables students to learn exercises that they can perform throughout their life with no or minimum,need of equipment.|
HPE 135
Aqua Aerobics
Achieves various aspects of physical fitness in a water medium.|
HPE 141
Badminton
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 142
Bowling
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 143
Golf
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 144
Racquetball Men
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 145
Racquetball Women
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 147
Beginning Tennis
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 150
Canoeing
Explores the skills of the paddling strokes and involves the nomenclature of modern canoes and equipment. Includes rescue techniques and how to plan a river trip.|
HPE 161
Basketball Men
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 162
Basketball Women
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 163
Volleyball Men
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 164
Volleyball Women
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 170
Step Aerobics Challenge
Expands the student's understanding of overall fitness. Students utilize step benches to obtain cardiovascular conditioning and hand weights to strengthen muscles and improve endurance. Each semester.|
HPE 181
Adapted Phy Ed
Modified or corrective physical education course for those who by reason of illness or disability are unable to participate in the more vigorous forms of physical education activities. On demand.|
HPE 185
Phys Fit And Cond
Enables students to develop a fitness and conditioning program to fit their individual needs through knowledge gained in areas such as nutrition, use of conditioning equipment, weight control, and fitness tests.|
HPE 186
Phys Fit Thru Stren Trng
Covers all basic weight lifting techniques and modern principles for developing and improving an aerobic fitness for both male and female students.|
HPE 191
Camp Outdoor Rec
Offers practical experience in the basic skills necessary for a successful camping excursion following conservation practices and techniques that retain the beauty of the wilderness ecosystems.|
HPE 220
Pers Hlth Promo & Behav Mgmt
This course will direct students to assess their personal wellness in each of the seven dimensions. The content will explore variables contributing to personal excellence and wellness and completion of a behavioral project.|
HPE 223
Phys Ed Elem Major
Required of all students majoring in elementary education. Emphasizes modern physical education skills and activities of the elementary child. Each semester.|
HPE 230
Basic/Emerg Water Safety
Students must demonstrate advanced swimming skills. Designed for participants to become familiar with the hazards of water activities, to prevent accidents, and to respond effectively if an accident does occur. Successful completion of the course lea,ds to Red Cross Certification.|
HPE 231
Interm Swimming
Multi-stroke refinement, drown-proofing, and physical conditioning through swimming. Prerequisite: Students should be able to swim one length of the pool.|
HPE 235
Intro Ele Health Concept
Introduces elementary education majors to basic health concepts and issues which elementary students face and are important for developing an appropriate understanding of health education today. Fall, annually.|
HPE 247
Interm Tennis
Emphasizes fundamental techniques, strategy, and rules.|
HPE 253
Nutrition for Healthy Living
Teaches about the different food groups and their roles in the human body, the type of chemical reactions during metabolism, the way the body makes and stores energy, and eating habits role in weight control.|
HPE 301
Special Topics
|
HPE 314
C P R
Required for the Athletic Coaching Program. Follows the recommendations and guidelines of the American Red Cross. Students earn an American Red Cross CPR Certificate upon successful completion of the course.|
HPE 317
First Aid Safety
Explores responsibilities and duties of the teacher in the development and teaching of programs in first aid and safety that are related to the student's school and community. Includes the American Red Cross Standard First Aid Course.|
HPE 323
Tch Hlth & Wellness Elem Sch
Required of all students majoring in elementary education. This class will focus on strategies for promoting the health of children both in and outside the educational setting. Students will learn the importance of both promoting a healthy lifestyle, within the young and the importance of advocating for a healthy environment in which all children and adults may flourish. Students will plan learning activities that will enhance the health knowledge, skills, attitudes and experience of young chil,dren. Included are labs and field experiences in an elementary school setting. Each semester.|
HPE 330
Lifeguard Training
Successful completion leads to Red Cross Certification. Prerequisite: Swim 500 yards continuously, using four different strokes, dive to a depth of nine feet, and bring up a 10-pound object, and tread water for one minute.|
HPE 335
Elem Health Curriculum
Designed for the elementary education major who may eventually work in a classroom setting. Prepares potential teachers to: (a) teach health education in a knowledgeable and effective manner, (b) demonstrate approaches for integrating health instruct,ion with other topics, and (c) familiarize the elementary major with current health curricula. Course offered on demand.|
HPE 410
Motor Learning & Development
Provides understanding of motor development and motor learning and how motor activities enhance the total development of young children. Emphasizes the design and implementation of open-ended, developmentally appropriate movement activities to stimul,ate problem solving and to be the cornerstone of an integrated curriculum. Additional focus on assessment of motor development and motor learning environments. Must be taken concurrently with ECH 320, 322, 323, 325, and 413. Prerequisites: ED 121. Ea,ch semester.|
HPE 415
Hiv/Aids Education
Experience-based course covers both the facts and the emotional issues involved in teaching about HIV infection. Psychosocial issues covered by the course include values, attitudes, and beliefs and their effects on teaching and learning about HIV, dr,ugs and drug use, and sex and sexuality. Emphasizes helping students develop the skills needed to make AIDS presentations with a non-judgmental perspective and sensitivity to the cultural diversity in their communities. Upon successful completion of,the course, students are Red Cross certified to present facts, answer questions, and identify resources for people who want more information on HIV infection, including AIDS. Prerequisite: HPE 111 or permission of the instructor. Course offered on de|
IA 211
Into To Intelligence Analysis
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the field of intellligence. Topics covered provide students with knowledge of the history of intelligence analysis and intelligence services, tools and skills used by the intelligenc,e analyst and the process used in the conduct basic intelligence research.|
IA 491
Synth Of Intell Anlys Proc
IA 491 is the capstone course for the minor in Intelligence Analysis. This course will provide a synthesis of the basic intelligence subjects from IA 211 with the student's knowledge base from their respective major area of concentration. This cour,se focuses on the analysis process, analysis products and reports, and the relationship between the analyst and the policy maker. Prerequisite: IA 211; Senior standing. Annually|
INDT 290
Advanced Manufacturing
Advanced Manufacturing is a hands-on laboratory course designed to give the fundamental skills necessary to work in a nanotechnology production and/or technologically advanced manufacturing environment. The course will discuss basic theoretical conc,epts behind research, development, production, and processing of nano-scaled materials. Safety, handling techniques, protocols, record keeping, production methodology, and analytical techniques will be the core concepts taken from this course. Prer,equisite: MATH 112, PH 251, PH 252. Annually, each fall semester.|
LS 255
Intro To Librarianship
Broad overview of libraries and the profession of librarianship beginning with the history of libraries and concluding with the impact of technology on libraries. Annually.|
LS 257
Basic Info Sources & Ser
Examines traditional and technological approaches to locating information. Analyzes the criteria for selecting reference materials and examines reviewing media for new reference sources. Explores the organization of reference service. Includes the, study of selected reference sources. Biennially.|
LS 258
Select Lib Materials
Provides familiarity with basic bibliographical tools, including current reviewing media and traditional and electronic publishing. Examines policies and criteria for the selection of and evaluation of book and nonbook resources. Biennially.|
LS 259
Intro to Library Support Serv
Introduces students to library theory and practice, including basic concepts and terminology, roles and mission, ethical standards, organizational structure, staffing and funding. Basic principles of public, technical, and access services are explor,ed. The role of support staff in customer service, team work and effective communication are examined. Includes coverage of the ALA Library Support Staff Certifiction competencies for foundations and communicatins and teamwork.|
LS 356
Media For Young Adults
Examines literature and other resources for young adults, including principles related to the selection, evaluation, and use of such materials. Considers and analyzes the reading interests of teenagers, the characteristics of young adult literature,, and methods of introducing young adults to books and nonbook resources, including electronic products and services. Examines techniques of developing/preparing booktalks, reviews, reader advisory services, and other programs for young adults, with,attention being paid to underserved and special needs groups. Biennially.|
LS 357
Organization Of Informa
Examines organization of print and non-print materials for effective service, principles and methods of descriptive cataloging, and the structure and application of the Dewey Decimal Classification, the Library of Congress Classification, and standar,d subject authority lists. Includes study of the use of printed cards and the utilization of other work simplication techniques; filing rules; and maintenance of library catalogs--shelf lists, divided and dictionary card catalogs, and the printed boo,k catalog. Biennially.|
LS 358
Media For Children
Surveys children's literature and related materials. Examines the principles of selection and evaluation of books, periodicals, and other materials for children. Includes reading guidance, with attention to materials for special groups; development o,f general and subject bibliographies; preparation of annotations; techniques of story-telling; and the selection of materials for the story hour. Includes a required field experience. Biennially.|
LS 361
Administration Of Libr
Addresses the general principles of administration and their application to the organization and management of different types of libraries. Core components include general management techniques and administrative procedures, budget preparation, hum,an resources issues, and facilities and resources management. Students will learn how to apply standards for evaluation of libraries and how to develop functional library programs. Provides a forum for the discussion of the roles of different types, of libraries in society. Includes a required field experience. Biennially.|
LS 370
Access Services
Examines the concepts, policies, procedures, and technology involved in library access services. Practices for the circulation, interlibrary loan, reserves, document delivery, shelf maintenance, and processing of materials are reviewed. Technology',s role in creating, retrieving, and delivering access to information and materials is studied. Covers the ALA Library Support Staff Certification competencies for access services and technology.|
LS 371
Direct User Services
Addresses the role of support staff in direct user services. Covers collection organization, search methods, and the nature of adult, young adult, and children's services and problems in libraries. The role of literary genres, different information, formats, and technology in user services as alsoaddressed. Includes coverage of the ALA Library Support Staff Certification competencies for adult's readers' advisory, reference and information services and youth services.|
LS 385
Library Automation
Surveys the use of automation in libraries. Topics covered include the selection of computer hardware and software for instructional purposes; use of automated library systems for library management activities such as circulation, acquisitions, and, cataloging; and the importance of computer networks to areas including resource sharing, professional development, and fiscal planning. Biennially|
LS 420
Student Tch Sem
Students meet and discuss practical and applicable issues as they occur and relate to their field experiences. Concurrent with student teaching.|
LS 440
Copy Catalog & Material Proces
Addresses copy cataloging and materials processing in libraries, including procedures for ordering, processing, and claiming all types of library materials, copy cataloging, inventory control, and preservation. Applications of information technology, are emphasized. Includes coverage of the ALA Library Support Staff Certification competencies for collection management and cataloging and classification. Prerequisite: LS 259 - Introduction to Library Support Services.|
LS 455
Special Topics
In-depth discussion, study, and research of a selected topic related to the role of the library in responding to social issues, service to special groups, or problem areas such as media and minorities, OCLC on-line bibliographic control, and media pr,ograms for the gifted. (Not creditable toward library science certification.) On demand.|
LS 457
Independent Study
Students explore in-depth a facet of librarianship according to need or interest, under the direction of a faculty member of the department. Special area to be approved by a faculty committee. Includes development of research techniques and the prepa,ration of a scholarly paper or completion of a special project. On demand.|
LS 459
Media, Meth, And Curr
Introduces planning for the effective use of school library media services in cooperation with the instructional staff. Examines school library media philosophies and educational objectives, the process of developing a library media program, and the, librarian's role in designing curriculum, developing teaching-learning strategies, and working with teachers, students, and administrators. Includes a three-week practical experience in a school library media center. Annually. Prerequisites: LS 2,57, 258, either 356 or 358, and ED 327.|
LS 470
Intern-Librarianship
Provides a laboratory experience in the professional atmosphere of a cooperating library or information center; allows undergraduate students who are not interested in school librarianship an opportunity to have an applied field experience in a publi,c or special library. Evaluation based on observation at the field site, an evaluative paper, and participation in professional seminars. Enrollment by permission of instructor Each semester.|
LS 491
Bus Ref Sources & Serv
Surveys the literature and services common in a business library or department of business information. Includes in-depth examination of major business reference tools, as well as in-depth examination of the special operations, organization, and mana,gement of business libraries and departments of business information. Annually.|
LS 500
Info Sources & Services
Philosophy and techniques of information services in libraries, with the sources, tools, and technology essential to the reference process. Specific reference problems and research studies, the reference interview, bibliographic instruction, and sear,ch strategies are considered. Recommended as an elective for nonlibrary science students in other graduate programs.|
LS 501
Develop Lib Collections
Acquiring familiarity with basic bibliographical tools, current reviewing media, and acquisitions procedures. Establishment of policies and criteria for the selection and evaluation of book and nonbook materials.|
LS 502
Cataloging & Classification
Introduction to the principles and techniques of organizing information with special reference to contemporary library practice. Students are introduced to descriptive cataloging using currently accepted national rules, alphabetical indexing using L,ibrary of Congress Subject Headings and Sears List of Subject Headings, and systematic indexing using the Dewey Decimal Classification and the Library of Congress Classification. The structure and use of manual and automated catalogs and indexes are, considered.|
LS 504
Intro To Inform Profess
This course introduces students to the nature of information and its role in society, the philosophical, ethical, and historical foundations of the information professions, major professional organizations, and the legal, political, and social issues, confronting today's information professionals. The identification and use of print and electronic information resources pertinent to library and information science are also covered. Accreditation assessment administered.|
LS 529
Inst Strat Libr & Info Prof
Prepares students with various approaches for integrating information literacy and resources into instruction in libraries and information centers; examines information literacy standards and guidelines, succh as those from AASL and ACRL, for applica,tion in all types of libraries and centers; reviews various instructional strategies, techniques, and resources, such as Web-based tutorials and thematic web pages, for implementation in programs.|
LS 532
Mgmt Of Sch Libr Media Centers
Introduction to managerial and administrative principles as applied in school library media centers; the role of the library media center in the school?s educational mission; current issues in school media librarianship. Pre- or corequisite: LS 504.|
LS 534
Admin & Mgmt Of Libraries
A study of managerial principles as they apply to libraries. Topics include, but are not limited to, planning, organizing, influencing and controlling the human, financial, physical and informational resources of libraries. Emphasis is placed on mon,itoring new trends in library facilities with regard to library functions. Prerequisite: prerequisite or corequisite LS 504. Fall, Spring, Summer II.|
LS 535
Archival Mgmt Small Repository
Introduction to the principles of archival theory as practiced in small repositories, including libraries and local historical societies. Appraisal, arrangement and description, and interpretation of materials are covered. Includes a field experien,ce.|
LS 536
Spec Coll Repres & Rec Mgmt
Course introduces students to detailed representation of special and local collections in library settings. Students will examine competing methods for representing such collections, including MARC, EAD, archival software, and local controlled vocab,ularies. Management and retention of electronic records will be covered. Students will produce a sample finding aid or other representation. Pre-requisite: LS 535.|
LS 537
Scholarly & Pro Publishing
This course will center on the topic of scholarly and professional communication and publishing. It involves the study of the traditional nature for communicating research and information and examines the recent trends concerning this practice. Dif,ferent ways for the dissemination of research and information and open access initiatives by publishers, university presses, and scholarly and professional organizations will be examined. The library's role in fostering this process is emphasized.,Summer, biennial.|
LS 540
Multic Src & Serv Ed & Libr
This course provides an opportunity for students to explore, understand, and develop library and educational resources and services for multicultural, diverse, and other special populations. Resources and services are examined particularly as they re,late to ethnicity, race, gender preference, and disability. Students will develop a sensitivity to the learning and informational needs of various cultural and ethnic groups and will develop techniques for selecting and using materials relevant to a,multicultural society.|
LS 541
Database Mgmt for Lib Pros
The course will provide library professionals the basic tools to understand database design and management as used in various integrated library systems and electronic resources. The course is designed to familiarize future and current library profe,ssionals with the logic and structure of fields, records and databases.|
LS 542
Info Seek Behav in User Int De
This course overviews theoretical and practical frameworks for a user centered approach to information service. The course concentrates on user interface design for information retrieval systems based on an understanding of human information seeking,behavior. This course will cover (1) theoretical foundations of various information behaviors and (2) practical analysis using user interface design principles, task and user analysis, user interface evaluation, and usability testing.|
LS 543
Adult Program for Public Libra
An introduction to the literature, history, principles, strategies and competencies of providing library service to adults as individuals and in groups; such as: readers of genre fiction; the independent learner; to populations of diverse cultural an,d ethnic backgrounds; older adults; educationally disadvantages or less literate; occupational (business, labor, etc.); institutionalized, etc. Examines the research based knowledge of adulthood and adult learning, the assessment of a community, elem,ents of program planning, the diverse advisory roles of librarians and their implications for the organization of informational, educational, and cultural programs and activities. Pre-req LS 500|
LS 545
Ref Serv Genealogy & Local His
Course introduces students to specialized reference resources for genealogy and local history. Students will assess the value and use of specific published documents and primary sources held in library collections. Major online resources will be ex,amined and compared. Students will create sample policies and procedures to deliver effective local history and genealogy reference services within specific library settings. Prerequisite: LS 500.|
LS 546
Virtual Information Services
This course provides an overview of the design and delivery of library services and library instruction to students and patrons at a distance. The course covers the methods and technologies used to deliver distance education and focuses on how the l,ibrary can be integrated into the delivery of courses offered in a variety of formats: services for remote users of other types of libraries are also considered. Pre-req. LS 500|
LS 547
Ldrship for Lib & Info Centers
Designed for students preparing to assume the role and duties of a leader, supervisor, and/or director in the field of librarianship; Explores the research and models of leadership relevant to defining and achieving goals in the library and informati,on center setting; Connects the role of management with the skills required for effective leadreship; and includes the examination of theory and practical application of organizational leadership.|
LS 549
Genre Fict & Read Advisory
Course introduces students to the readers' advisory process as a means of assisting library users in identifying appropriate reading materials to meet recreational reading needs. Major genres of fiction (e.g., romance, mystery, adventrue, etc.) are,examined. Bibliographic tools to support the reader's advisory process are identified and examined.|
LS 550
Adv Research Meth in Lib Sci
In depth study of quantitative and qualitative research methodologies as they apply to library science; emphasis on formulating the research proposal, conducting studies, analyzing data, reporting findings, and interpreting results; includes a critic,al analysis of the professional research literature. Prerequisite: LS 504. Study of the scientific methods of planning, conducting, and reporting investigation and research in library science, including specific problems in library service. Critic,al analysis of research in professional literature. Designed to develop skill in interpreting research results.|
LS 552
Adv Cat And Class
In-depth exploration of the issues involved in organizing collections with special reference to authority control, the cataloging and classification of nonbook materials (including electronic resources), and the use of Library of Congress Subject Hea,dings and the Library of Congress Classification. Prerequisite: LS 502.|
LS 556
Resource in the Sci, Tec & Med
Surveys the information sources and services typically found in science, technology, and health collections, libraries or information centers. Includes in-depth examination of major information sources, print and electronic, and of various ways user,s access this information. Prerequisite: LS 500.|
LS 557
Resource in the Social Science
Surveys the print and electronic information sources typically found in social science collections, including areas of anthropology, business, economics, education, geography, history, political science, and psychology. Examines the various ways use,rs access this information and the associated services provided by libraries and information centers. Prerequisite: LS 500.|
LS 558
Resources in the Humanities
Surveys the print and electronic information sources typically found in humanities collections, including areas of art, literature, music, philosophy, and religion. Examines the various ways users access this information and the associated services,provided by libraries and information centers. Prerequisite: LS 500.|
LS 562
Government Info & Librnshp
Study and evaluation of federal, state, municipal , and intergovernmental publications, print and electronic; the nature of government materials, their reference and research value; techniques of organization, access, and control of print and electro,nic materials; issues concerning various government electronic resources. Prerequisite: LS 500|
LS 568
Hist Of Books & Printing
Study of the evolution of the printed book through a survey of the origin of recorded communication; history of writing materials; study of manuscript production, typography, type design, illustration, bookbinding, book production, and copyright from, the earliest times to the present.|
LS 569
Mgmt Of Tech & Access Ser
Introduction to managerial and administrative principles as applied in library technical and access services. Areas covered include acquisitions, cataloging, serials control, circulation, document delivery, interlibrary loan, and preservation. Specia,l attention is paid to automation issues. Prerequisites: LS 502, 504.|
LS 570
Internship in Librianship
Provides an advanced preprofessional experience through work in a cooperating library or information center. Students are expected to apply and evaluate the theory and practice learned in the classroom; prepare an evaluative paper, and be observed a,nd evaluated by the site supervisor. Accreditation assessments administered. Prerequisites: successful completion of at least 30 credit hours, including all other required courses; permission of advisor, internship coordinator, and the department c,hair. For students not seeking initial certification.|
LS 572
Law In Libraries
Addresses the legal and ethical concepts and issues related to librarianship. Topics include employment law, intellectual property, civil rights, social responsibility, intellectual freedom and privacy law particularly as they relate to libraries. Et,hics, values and foundational principles of the library and information professions are covered.|
LS 573
Integ Technologies In Libr
Survey of library automation; the application of computers to library technical and administrative processes. The state of the art; case studies of automation projects; systems analysis; design of library automation projects. Annual, fall.|
LS 574
Online Information Retrieval
Web-based information retrieval is explored and discussed. A variety of search engines, strategies, and protocols are examined and compared. Prerequisite: LS 504|
LS 575
Digital Libraries
Provides an overview of topics concerning digital libraries, including, but not limited to, organization and structure, programming interoperability and metadata standards, project management, intellectual property rights, and various interface appli,cations. Students are expected to examine topics of interest concerning digital libraries, culminating in the preparation of a term project.|
LS 576
Special Topics
In-depth discussion, study, and research of a topic related to the role of the library in responding to social issues, service to special groups, or problem areas. The following represent typical offerings: (1) Bibliotherapy; (2) Microcomputers in Li,braries; (3) Library Services for the Gifted; (4) Media and Minorities; (5) Oral History; (6) Connectivity: Understanding the Information Infrastructure. A maximum of six credit hours may be applied toward graduation.|
LS 577
Librs, Lit & The Child
Opportunity for graduate students to investigate (1) the nature of children?s literature; (2) the utilization of children?s literature in school, public and special library settings; (3) trends in children?s literature as a part of the total body of,literature and as an educational force; and (4) current research in the field. Biennially.|
LS 578
Pub Libs Rural Am
Introduction to the public library in the United States, with special concern for the small rural library. Particular emphasis on the problems and limitations of such libraries and approaches for overcoming them.|
LS 579
Issues In Urban Librarianship
A survey of issues facing all types of libraries located in urban settings. School, public, and academic libraries will be discussed in the context of how the urban environment presents special challenges in designing, implementing, and managing libr,ary services. Prerequisite: LS 504.|
LS 580
Lib Mktg & The Community
Addresses the following aspects of successful community analysis and marketing of library services: the current and potential library users; their specific informational needs; and how the library can provide adequate service.|
LS 582
Electronic & Cont Resources
Examines the organization and management of electronic resources and print/pnline continuing publications, such as journals, annuals, etc.; highlights issues surrounding subscriptions, licensing, access, and ownership of materials.|
LS 583
Lib Lit And Young Adults
Examination of the role of the librarian in the selection, evaluation, and use of materials for junior and senior high school age persons. Includes a study of young adult literature and trends affecting its development; techniques for providing reade,r advisory services; methods of reaching and serving multicultural and special needs audiences; characteristics of the young adult in contemporary society; and development of programs and other means of introducing young adults to books and nonbook m,edia, with special attention to emerging electronic products and services.|
LS 587
Indexing & Abstracting
In-depth survey and hands-on development of documents surrogates, including annotations, abstracts, precis, and other forms of indexing.|
LS 588
Pres & Conserv Of Lib Ma
Survey of preservation and conservation activities in libraries and information centers, including disaster planning, environmental factors, treatment of brittle books, library binding, special problems of nonbook materials, and basic conservation tr,eatments. Prerequisites: LS 501 or permission of instructor.|
LS 589
Apply Web Tech in Libraries
Studies the application and use of emerging Web content and technologies in diverse library settings.|
LS 590
Global Perspectives In Libshp
A study of libraries and librarianship throughout the world with an in depth focus in selected countries; emphasis is placed on library education and issues related to culture, technological advances, economics, and politics; the role and impact of p,rofessional organizations on libraries and library education worldwide is examined. Annual, summer.|
LS 591
Bus Ref Sources & Serv
Surveys the information sources and services typically found in corporate libraries, public library business information centers, and other specialized libraries with a business clientele. Includes in-depth examination of major business reference too,ls, as well as in-depth examination of the special operations, organization, and management of business libraries and departments of business information. Prerequisite: LS 500.|
LS 600
Research in Librarianship
Intended as capstone experience for students in the Master of Science in Library Science program. Provides the opportunity to pursue a research project related to the student's area of specialization or interest and which is based on a research stra,tegies developed in LS 550. Accreditation assessments administered. Prerequisites: LS 550 and successful completion of at least 30 credit hours, including all other required courses; project approval by advisor, instructor, and the department chai,r. For students not seeking initial teacher certification.|
MAED 501
Teaching Sec Mathematics
Teachers will learn how to integrate a variety of different strategies in teaching secondary mathematics. They will improve their understanding of mathematical concepts and apply these instructional strategies to improving student understanding. Pr,erequisite: Certification in teaching math. Offered: Summers and occasionally Spring.|
MAED 511
Tech for Teaching Sec Math
This course is designed to give secondary mathematics teachers an in-depth look at the research on the impact of technology on teaching and learning mathematics. Students will learn how to develop and critique technology experiences and will be expo,sed to new technologies and programs that aid in teaching mathematics. Prerequisite: Certification in teaching secondary mathematics or permission of instructor.|
MAED 532
Teaching Statistical Reasoning
Quantitative Literacy (QL) has proven to be an exciting, standards-based approach for teaching statistical techniques in K-12 classrooms. Through stimulating practical activities, the TI-83 graphing calculator and the statistical software FATHOM, te,achers in this course will explore real data focusing on classification, graphing, sampling, probability, simulation, and inference. This direct involvement and in-depth training will enable teachers to experience first-hand the value of QL and gain, confidence in their abilities to incorporate it into their classrooms. The course will include a fall follow up session where teachers report the use of a quantitative reasoning activity in their own classroom. Prerequisite: certification in teac|
MAED 537
Geometry/Trig For Sec Ed Tchrs
The course will visit axiom systems, review the core theorems of high school geometry, consider advanced topics in Euclidean Geometry, explore Non-Euclidean Geometries, examine Area and Transformations, look at trigonometry and have student presentat,ions of a relatively new geometric topic. Computer software (Geometer's Sketchpad, Kaliedomania, maple, ...) will be at teh center of the students work. Prerequisite: Admission into the program or permission of the instructor. Offered: Summer.|
MAED 540
Discrete Math For Tchrs 7-12
A course to review and develop a sound mathematical foundation for discrete mathematics topics covered in secondary school mathematics.|
MAED 550
Pre-Algebra For Teacher
Teachers will learn how to integrate a variety of different strategies in teaching concepts found in pre algebra (grades 6-8). They will improve their understanding of the mathematical concepts from an advanced perspective and apply these instructio,nal strategies to improving student understanding. Prerequisite: certification in teaching-mathematics teachers who are presently teachers of grades 5-9. Offered: Summer.|
MAED 551
Algebra & Number Thy for Tchrs
Students will examine pedagogy and use recent technology to reinforce their understanding of algebra and number theory topics covered in high school algebra and how to present them to their students. They will develop a deeper understanding of the p,rinciples underlying these topics, allowing them greater ability to adapt their teaching to meet the changing needs of their students. Additionally, they will look at the effects that technology is having on the subject matter taught and the methods, of teaching it. Prerequisite: MATH 451 or equivalent.|
MAED 556
Research in Math Tch & Learn
Students will investigate the research in mathematics teaching and learning that has been conducted in the last century, and particularly in the last three decades. Through this investigation, students will become more aware of critical issues withi,n the field of mathematics education. Various areas will be considered, including teachers' knowledge and beliefs, students' learning in number theory, rational numbers, algebra, and geometry, technology in mathematics education, and issues of affec,t and gender. Prerequisite: Certification in Secondary Mathematics or permission of instructor. Offered: Summer|
MAED 571
Analysis for Teachers
This course is designed to give secondary mathematics teachers an in-depth look at the analysis covered in the secondary mathematics curriculum. The concept of the function will be covered in great detail. This course will also cover the historical, development of calculus to gain greater insight into the fundamental theories of calculus (secondary level). Prerequisite: certification in teaching secondary mathematics or permission of instructor.|
MAED 581
Problem Solving
The course is designed to give students experience solving novel and often open-ended problems in multiple ways. Posing and solving problems drawn from rational numbers, number theory, algebra, measurement and geometry will help students to reinforc,e and integrate various strands of their high school mathematics curriculum and to reason and communicate more effectively. Prerequisite: Certification in Secondary Mathematics Education or ED 339: Meth of Teach & Eval Math and permission of instru,ctor. Offered: Summer|
MAED 585
App & Math Model For Teacher
A course to use mathematics in representing and solving real world problems. Mathematical concepts from middle school and high school mathematics will be applied to problems in social, physical, and biological sciences. Pedagogical and assessment i,ssues will be studied. Prerequisite: Certification in teaching mathematics, or mathematical science teachers in grades 7 through 12. Highly recommended: calculus, linear algebra, differential equations, or statistics. Offered: Summer.|
MAED 590
Historical Dev Of Mathematics
Students will explore the development of mathematics, from the early development of numeration systems to modern mathematics. They will learn how the technology and culture of different places and times affected the topics developed as well as the m,ethods used. Students will also discuss and develop ways to incorporate this information into their classroom teaching and to encourage cross disciplinary connections. Prerequisite: Degree in mathematical sciences or permission.|
MARS 320
Marine Geology
Sedimentary and tectonic characteristics of the continental margins and deep ocean basins; sediment transport and deposition in marine environments; marine geophysical methods at sea; marine mineral resources. Prerequisite: Introductory Geology and O,ceanography. Summer, on demand.|
MARS 341
Marine Biology
Deals briefly with the history of marine biology, and with the interrelationship of chemical and physical oceanography and marine biology. Marine habitats will be studied in more detail with reference to the adaptations of plant and animal inhabitan,ts. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MARS 345
Marine Ornithology
An introductory course on the bird fauna of the sea coast, including avian diversity and ecology. Students will learn to identify coastal birds using plumage, behavior and songs. Lecture material will include information on distribution, behavior,,physiology and anatomy of birds. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MARS 360
Marine Ecology
Interrelationships among animals, plants, and physical and chemical aspects of the environment will be studied, with an emphasis on adaptations for survival which are unique to the marine environment. Zoogeography and food chain interactions will al,so be studied with some emphasis placed on the impacts of human activities. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MARS 403
Research Diver Methods
Study and practice of aquatic research methods using SCUBA as a tool. Advanced research diving topics include areas such as navigation, search and recovery, underwater photography, survey methods, estimating population parameters, and data acquisiti,on while under water. Specific research techniques will be presented in the context of specific aquatic research project conducted by students under the director of the instructor. Each summer.|
MARS 431
Ecology Of Marine Plankton
Study of the phytoplankton and zooplankton in marine and brackish environments. Qualitative and quantitative comparisons will be made between the planktonic populations of various types of habitats in relation to primary and secondary productivity., Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MARS 443
Marine Ichthyology
Study of the internal and external structure of fishes, their classification and evolutionary relationships, their ecology and behavior, their physiology and environmental requirements, and their distribution patterns in marine and brackish environme,nts. Course taught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MARS 471
Scan Electron Microscop Marine
Trains students in the use of a portable scanning electron microscope (PSEMII), including principles of operation and use the SEM, preparation of geological and biological samples for imaging, size and shape analysis, and elemental and mineralogical,analysis with the energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX). The latter portion of the course is dedicated to the design and execution of independent research projects in investigating a problem in marine science using the SEM and/or EDX. Course ta,ught at the Marine Science Consortium (MSC), Wallops Island, Virginia.|
MATH 10
Prep For College Math
Covers basic arithmetic and geometic principles necessary for the subsequent study of introductory algebra and other more advanced courses requiring a basic mathematics competency. Emphasizes decreasing mathematics anxiety, developing mathematics tex,t-reading abilities, including the study of vocabulary unique to the mathematics discipline, developing estimation skills, interpreting data, mental mathematics, and critical thinking. Major learning modalities are written response, calculator use an,d experimentation, analysis activities, and problem-solving.|
MATH 50
Basic Algebra
Introduces basic arithmetic and algebraic concepts, including an introduction to real numbers and algebraic expressions, solving equations and inequalities, polynomials, factoring, graphing, and systems of equations. Credits in this course do not cou,nt toward general education or graduation. Prerequisite: Appropriate placement determined by the Mathematics Department. Each semester.|
MATH 110
Intermediate Algebra
Covers topics in algebra beyond the introductory level, yet less than the precalculus level. No student who has satisfactorily completed MATH 131 or a higher-numbered mathematics course may subsequently receive credit for MATH 110. Prerequisite: C or, better in MATH 050 or satisfactory score on the department's placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 111
Math Conc Grades K-8
Examines operations and properties of integers, fractions, and decimals. Includes elementary set theory, number theory, and functions. Covers conceptual foundations of the numerical content of the mathematics curriculum in the elementary and middle g,rades, emphasizing problem solving. MATH 111 is the first in a two-part sequence; the study of measurement, geometry, data gathering, and other topics are included in MATH 211. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 050 or satisfactory score on the depart,mental placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 112
Excursions Math
Acquaints students with the nature and scope of modern mathematics and its applications. Emphasizes concepts and understanding rather than acquisition of techniques. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 050 or satisfactory score on the departmental plac,ement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 113
Quantitative Reasoning
Helps students develop quantitative reasoning skills. Core content, common to all sections, covers elements of descriptive statistics with particular emphasis on the representation and interpretation of data. Additional topics, covered at the instr,uctor's discretion, may include basic finance, probability, and logic. Prerequisite: MATH 112. Each semester.|
MATH 117
Mathematics for Health Science
Mathematics for Health Sciences (MATH 117), a three (3) credit course, will prepare students in health science related majors for the mathematical applications within the healthcare field. Topics that will be included are algebra; fractions and frac,tional equations; ratios and proportions; percentages, variation; relationships among systems of measure; scientific notation; logarithms; calculation of dosages; and basic geometry, graphing, and statistics. The course will incorporate real world ex,amples in an effort to foster the development of critical thinking and problem solving skills necessary for success in today's healthcare space. Concepts included will be relevant for the various discipline specific certification exams. Prerequisite|
MATH 131
Applied Finite Math
Covers mathematical techniques with special applications in business and related areas. Includes matrices, linear programming, and mathematics of finance. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or satisfactory score on the departmental placement examination. Each se,mester.|
MATH 170
Algebra & Trig Mid Sch Tchrs
Investigates topics in algebra and trigonometry including rational expressions, exponential equations, linear equations and systems of linear equations, and right triangle trigonometry. This course is specifically designed to prepare students for to,pics in algebra and trigonometry that are encountered in the middle school classroom. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent Mathematics Department Placement and enrollment in the College of Education and Human Services.|
MATH 171
Precalculus
Prepares students for calculus by covering high school algebra, functions, inequalities, analytic trigonometry, logarithms, elementary theory of equations, complex numbers, and mathematical induction. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or satisfactory score on t,he departmental placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 200
Reasoning & Proof In Math
Students will explore mathematical reasoning and learn the basic logic behind mathematical proofs. Prerequisite: MATH 111 and 170 or equivalent. Restricted to students in the College of Education and Human Services.|
MATH 201
Technology in Teaching Math
Investigates the use of technology in the practice of teaching mathematics. Topics will include the appropriate use of technology to both present and study mathematics. Prerequisite: MATH 110 or equivalent Mathematics Department Placement and enro,llment in the College of Education and Human Services.|
MATH 211
Fund Topics In K-8 Math
Investigates selected topics considered essential to the basic mathematics curriculum in the elementary and middle grades. Includes introductions to mathematical reasoning, additional problem-solving techniques, probability and data analysis, geometr,y and measurement. Math 211 is the second in a two-part sequence beginning with MATH 111. Prerequisite: MATH 111. Each semester.|
MATH 212
Intuitive Geometry
Intuitive overview of geometry; Euclid's Axioms, exploration of relationships, measurement and coordinate geometries, geometrics on other surfaces, and geometry in nature and art. Prerequisite: Any 100-level mathematics course. On demand.|
MATH 213
Intuitive Calculus
Explores development of the basic properties of the real number system and the calculus, including functions, sequences, limits, continuity, integrals, and derivatives. Examines topics graphically, symbolically, and numerically. Prerequisite: Any 100,-level mathematics course. On demand.|
MATH 214
Finite Math
Introduces basic properties of finite mathematics, including logic, counting techniques, elementary probability, and application to social and computer science. Prerequisite: Any 100-level mathematics course. On demand.|
MATH 215
Math Concept Lab
Develops certain concepts of mathematics using an activity-oriented approach. Conducted in a laboratory atmosphere. Includes the rational number system, number theory, induction, measurement, geometric shapes. On demand. Prerequisite: Any 100-level, mathematics course.|
MATH 216
Prob Solv Strat In Math
An introduction to the problem solving nature of mathematics. Focus is on using quantitative reasoning and intuitive logical thought techniques to solve problems (rather than formal rigid processes). Selected topics may include, but are not limited t,o, set theory, algebra, geometry, number theory, mathematical puzzles and games, estimation, and infinity. Prerequisite: 'C' or better in MATH 110 or equivalent mathematics placement and enrollment in the College of Education and Human Services.|
MATH 217
Historical Dev of Math Teacher
Investigates topics in the history of mathematics, including development of number systems, development of important fields of mathematics. Some important mathematical ideas and developments will be seen as products of their times. Prerequisite: M,ATH 211. Restricted to students in the College of Education and Human Services.|
MATH 221
Elementary Applied Stats
Examines basic principles and methods of statistical analysis useful in the social sciences, biology, and education. Designed specifically for students not majoring in mathematics. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 050 or satisfactory score on the de,partmental placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 222
Elem Nonparametric Stats
Examines statistical methods for experiments that yield small samples and/or ordinal data, methods for dealing with data from unknown or intractable distributions and the basis for a well-designed experiment. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 050 or,satisfactory score on the departmental placement examination. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
MATH 225
Elem Survey Sampling
Addresses the problems of bias--in both the mathematics and the survey designs, while introducing the student to the major survey designs. Prerequisite: MATH 221, 222, or 321 or permission of instructor. Spring, even-numbered years.|
MATH 232
Calculus Bus I
Examines differential calculus with application to business and the social sciences. Topics include limits, derivatives, maxima and minima, and an introduction to integration. MATH 232-3 are designed for students outside the natural sciences. Prerequ,isite: MATH 110 or adequate placement in the mathematics placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 233
Calculus Bus II
Applies integral calculus to business and the social sciences. Includes rules of integration, definite and indefinite integrals, series, and partial derivatives. MATH 232-3 are designed for students outside the natural sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 23,2 or the equivalent. Each semester.|
MATH 260
Applied Calculus
Covers the concepts and applications of differential and integral calculus. Includes derivatives and their applications, integrals and their applications, integration techniques, numerical integration, and the calculus of several variables. For stude,nts in the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 171 or satisfactory score on the departmental placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 270
Calculus I
Covers elementary analytic geometry, limits, continuity, differentiability, applications, definition of the Riemann integral, and the fundamental theorem of Calculus. Students in mathematics and sciences and better-prepared students in other discipli,nes are encouraged to select MATH 270-271 instead. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 171 or satisfactory score on the departmental placement examination. Each semester.|
MATH 271
Calculus II
Reviews limits and definition of the Reimann integral. Covers applications, integration techniques, and topics in analytic geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 270. Each semester.|
MATH 272
Calculus III
Reviews sequences and series. Analyzes geometry of 3-space, vectors, vector functions, basic properties of limits, continuous and differentiable functions of several variables, and multiple integrals. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Each semester.|
MATH 285
Mathematical Modeling
Develops higher-level problem solving strategies using mathematics to solve real world problems. Applications from diverse disciplines will be represented by mathematical models that will then be solved and analyzed in the context of each problem. Pr,erequisite: ENG 110 (or equivalent) and one of either MATH 270 or 260, both with grades of C or better. Annually.|
MATH 290
Calculus Workshop
Overview of the calculus sequence that allows students to examine problems in differential and integral calculus by applying simultaneously the methods learned from the entire sequence. Discusses some new topics and techniques in analysis. Prerequisi,te: MATH 272. Annually.|
MATH 295
Projects In Mathematics
The course is designed to provide undergraduates with practical experience in the real-world use of Mathematics. Students will work on projects that provide exposure to emerging areas of Mathematics such as Applied Mathematics, Mathematical Modeling,, Industrial Mathematics, Computational Science, and Mathematical Programming. A maximum of eight credits in this course may be applied toward graduation. Prerequisite: permission of instructor. Each semester.|
MATH 300
Intro To Advanced Math
Rigorous approach to the study of the standard methods of mathematical proof applied to topics in the theory of numbers, sets, functions, and analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Every semester.|
MATH 321
Inter Applied Stats I
Provides an overview of the basic theory and application of mathematical statistics. Emphasizes understanding and applying basic statistical theory. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Fall, annually.|
MATH 322
Intermed Statistics II
Examines in further detail the analysis of variance, factorial experiments, and multiple regression. Prerequisite: MATH 321 (MATH 221/222 with instructor's permission). Spring, even-numbered years.|
MATH 340
Discrete Math Structures
Introduces sets, relations, functions, combinations, graphs, and trees, emphasizing concrete models. Includes computer algorithms and mathematical structures useful in computer science. Designed for students in both mathematics and computer science.,Prerequisites: MATH 300 and CPSC 201.|
MATH 350
Differentl Equat
Studies first order differential equations, linear differential equations of higher order, and systems of differential equations. Prerequisite: MATH 272. Spring, annually.|
MATH 357
Modern Geometry
Axiomatic treatment of topics in geometry. Prerequisite: MATH 300.|
MATH 360
Num Meth In Math I
Examines types of error, calculus of finite differences, numerical evaluation of integrals, algorithms for the solution of algebraic equations, and systems of algebraic equations with applications to selected problems and computer programming of algo,rithms. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Each Spring Semester (360); on demand (460).|
MATH 370
Linear Algebra
Introduces systems of linear equations, vector spaces, linear transformations, matrices, determinants, eigen vectors, and eigen values. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Each semester.|
MATH 390
Junior Seminar In Mathematics
This course is an introduction to the literature in Mathematics and Mathematics Education. Students will read a collection of articles or chapters of books with topics ranging from history, applications, and creativity, to research in mathematics ed,ucation and nature of mathematics. Students will write short papers that provide their reactions and insights about the materials from each reading assignment. Each student is also required to choose a topic for the Senior Seminar. Prerequisite:,6 hours of 300-level or higher mathematics courses and the consent of the mathematics department chair.|
MATH 421
Mathematical Stats I
Explores basic concepts of elementary probability, probability in finite spaces, conditional probability, independent trials, sophisticated counting, and probability in relation to random variables. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and MATH 300. Fall, even-nu,mbered years.|
MATH 422
Mathematical Stats II
Analyzes mathematical expectation, discrete and continuous random variables, probability densities, sampling distributions, point estimations, interval estimations, tests of hypotheses, regression and correlation, analysis of variation, and moment-ge,nerating functions. Prerequisite: MATH 421. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
MATH 451
Modern Algebra I
Introduces groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. Emphasizes rigorous proof and logical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 300. Fall and spring, respectively.|
MATH 452
Modern Algebra II
Introduces groups, rings, integral domains, and fields. Emphasizes rigorous proof and logical methods. Prerequisite: MATH 300. Fall and spring, respectively.|
MATH 454
Theory Of Numbers
Examines factorization, congruence, quadratic reciprocity, number theoretic functions, diophantine equations, and continued fractions. Prerequisite: MATH 300.|
MATH 459
Intro To Complex Var
Covers the complex plane, analytic functions, poles, residues, and their applications, including the fundamental theorem of algebra. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and 300.|
MATH 460
Numerical Meth Math II
Examines types of error, calculus of finite differences, numerical evaluation of integrals, algorithms for the solution of algebraic equations, and systems of algebraic equations with applications to selected problems and computer programming of algo,rithms. Prerequisite: MATH 271. Each Spring Semester (360); on demand (460).|
MATH 471
Intro Real Anal I
Covers limits, continuity, differentiability, integrability, and convergence for functions of a real variable and several variables. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and 300.|
MATH 472
Intro Real Anal II
Covers limits, continuity, differentiability, integrability, and convergence for functions of a real variable and several variables. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and 300.|
MATH 473
Elem Topology
Explores topological spaces, metric spaces, compactness, and connectedness. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and MATH 300.|
MATH 480
Special Topics
Offers special topics reflecting the interests of the students. The specific topic to be covered each term will be announced in advance. Prerequisites: MATH 272 and permission of the instructor.|
MATH 490
Seminar I
Individual study under faculty supervision. MATH 390, 12 hours of 300-level or above mathematics courses and written consent of the department chair.|
MATH 491
Seminar II
Seminar in mathematics. Oral and written presentations are required.|
MATH 492
Seminar III
Seminar in mathematics. Oral and written presentations are required.|
MATH 495
Industrial Mathematics Wksp
Serves as the capstone course for students in the Industrial Mathematics Program. Students work to find solutions to problems originating from business, industry, medicine, and government. Requires written and oral presentations. Prerequisites: Compl,etion of MATH 270, 271, 272 (all with C or better), MATH 300, 12 credit hours of mathematics numbered above MATH 300, and permission of instructor. Fall, annually.|
MATH 499
Independent Study
Individual study under faculty supervision. Prerequisites: 12 hours of math numbered 300 or above and written consent of the department chair.|
MATH 530
New Math
|
MATH 531
Topics In Geom
|
MATH 532
Statistics
|
MATH 533
Found H.S. Math
|
MATH 541
Rec Math
|
MATH 553
Real Variables I
|
MATH 554
Real Variables II
|
MATH 555
Topology I
|
MATH 557
Infinite Series
|
MATH 559
Com Variables I
|
MATH 561
Abstract Alg I
|
MATH 562
Abstract Alg II
|
MATH 563
Linear Algebra
|
MATH 569
Math Logic
|
MATH 573
Numerical Anal
|
MATH 575
Alge Num Theory I
|
MATH 580
Seminar
|
MATH 590
Individual Research
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MC 100
Making Connections
|
MEDD 301
Med Dosimetry Trmt Plan
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 301 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
MEDD 302
Medical Dosimetry Dose Calc
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 302 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
MEDD 303
Med Dosimetry PT Care & Ed
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 303 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technolgy (JTCERT).|
MEDD 401
Med Dosimetry Rad Phy
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 401 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program i,n medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JTCERT).|
MEDD 402
Med Dosimetry Appl Radia Onco
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 402 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
MEDD 403
Med Dosimetry Rad Prot
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in medical dosimetry, MEDD 403 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 6 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program i,n medical dosimetry that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
MGMT 120
Intro to Business Integ Exper
Introduces students to the role of the business institiution in society and the challenges it faces. The course integrates the study of business within all functional areas of business, Economics, Accounting, Finance, Management and Marketing. The,course introduces students to professional standards in business through experiential learning opportunities. Required of all BSBA majors. Open to all students. Each semester. No prerequisites.|
MGMT 121
Fund Of Management
Introduces management and organization. Emphasizes managerial processes and functions and the interface of the manager with supervisors, subordinates, and the work environment. B.S.B.A. majors can apply this course to free electives only. Each semest,er, Venango only.|
MGMT 210
Ess Of Entre Small Bus Mgmt
Explores the entrepreneurial process associated with new venture formation. Examines managerial processes as they relate to the operation of a small business. The role of a formal business plan is highlighted and developed. Highlights the preparatio,n involved in the formation of a new venture, developing the entrepreneurial plan, and adapting to comtemporary challenges facing the entrepreneur. B.S.B.A. majors can apply this course to free electives only. Prerequisite: MGMT 120. Spring, annually,. Venango only.|
MGMT 227
Appl Supervision
Prepares students for a position as a first-time supervisor and includes the essential elements of good management practices and stresses application rather than theoretical supervision concepts. B.S.B.A. majors can apply this course to free elective,s only. Prerequisites: sophomore standing and MGMT 120. Spring, annually, Venango only.|
MGMT 228
Human Behav/Orgs
Explores how basic psychological principles can be used to describe, explain, and predict individuals' on-the-job thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Includes personality, motivation, perception, attitudes, stress, communication, learning, leadership,, group behavior, cooperation, decision-making, and research methods. B.S. business administration majors can apply this course to free electives only. No prerequisite. On demand at both the Clarion and Venango Campuses.|
MGMT 320
Mgmt Theory And Practice
Focuses on the development of management thought and its application. Includes planning, organizing, controlling, decision-making, motivation, leadership, work groups, and organizational change and development. Considers the domestic and internationa,l environments and changing societal values. Prerequisites: ECON 211, ECON 212, and junior standing. Each semester.|
MGMT 321
Org Theory & Behavior
Focuses on the managerial application of behavioral science research and theory in dealing with individuals, groups, and organizations. Prerequisite: MGMT 121 or 320. Each semester.|
MGMT 322
Mgmt Of B I S
Shows managers how to develop business management information systems, either on their own or with the aid of system technicians. Simulates the systems techniques in organizing and analysis that the student will use in practice. Prerequisite: MGMT 32,0. Each semester.|
MGMT 323
Small Business
Explores the challenges and prospects of initiating and operating a small business. Emphasizes strategies for creating and maintaining a sustainable competitive advantage in the marketplace. Highlights sources and uses of information needed for small, business decision-making. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Once every three semesters.|
MGMT 324
Human Resources Mgmt
A study of the activities involved in human resource management. Includes high performance work systems, job analysis, human resource planning, recruitment, selection, equal employment opportunity, training and development, performance appraisal, com,pensation practices, and safety and health. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Each semester.|
MGMT 360
Leadership Communication
The course provides an overview of the role of communication in leadership in a variety of contexts, including interpersonal, small group, intercultural, organizational, and public sphere. It includes theoretical and experiential approaches to effec,tive leadership communication. Students will analyze their personal leadership styles and develop leadership communication skills.|
MGMT 420
Operations Research
Examines scientific methods that provide managers with a quantitative basis for making decisions. Emphasizes deterministic and stochastic methods, including the transportation method, linear and dynamic programming, PERT, inventory control, queuing t,heory, and Markov analysis. Prerequisite: ECON 222.|
MGMT 423
Bus Society, & Corp Conduct
A study of concepts of, and theories about, interrelationships between business units and society in general. Employs the concepts and theories in the analysis of complex environmental problems encountered by business managers. Prerequisite: MGMT 32,0.|
MGMT 425
Operations Management
Examines the philosophy of F.W. Taylor and other management pioneers, the nature of the production cycle, simplification and diversification of product lines, purchasing, materials, control, routing, scheduling, dispatching, and plant layout. Prerequ,isites: ECON 221, 222, and MGMT 320. Each semester.|
MGMT 426
Global Business Leadership
Introduces the international environment and the growing discipline of multinational business in this environment--i.e., multinational management of strategic planning, organization, production, research and development, marketing, finance, and human, resources. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Each semester.|
MGMT 427
Entrepreneurial Leadership Sem
Hands-on approach to the study of small business as it applies to the various sectors of the economy. Students gain direct exposure to small business through the development of a formal business plan for a new small business. Emphasizes the entrepren,eurial activities involved as they relate to this process. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 428
Entrepreneurship
Explores entrepreneurship and the entrepreneurial process associated with new venture formation. Emphasizes creativity and innovation as they relate to the initiation of a new business. Highlights the preparation involved in the formation of a new ve,nture, developing the entrepreneurial plan, and adapting to contemporary challenges facing the entrepreneur. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 430
Sports Management
Provides students with an understanding of how the principles and concepts of management theory can be applied to sports administration. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Every other semester.|
MGMT 445
Management Seminar
Designed for management majors as a follow-up course to MGMT 320. Presents the views of numerous management theorists and practitioners. Includes broad ranging areas of study and an integration of these areas through discussion, individual written an,d oral reports, and some case analyses. Students analyze and integrate theory and practice as a means of increasing his or her understanding of the management process. Prerequisites: MGMT 320 and senior standing. On demand.|
MGMT 450
Quality Management
Examines Total Quality Management (TQM), including the philosophies and principles of Deming, Juran, and Crosby. Focuses on the management and continuous improvement of quality and productivity in manufacturing and service organizations. Includes qua,lity measurement, quality assurance, giving employees responsibility for quality, the team approach to quality, employee recognition, and various TQM tools and techniques. Prerequisite: MGMT 320. Annually.|
MGMT 470
Project Management
Introduces students to basic project management concepts and reinforces those concepts through the use of project management software. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize and control information technology pro,jects. Key topics include monitoring and controlling schedules, progress reporting, risk management, quality management, cost management as well as contracting and procurement. Graduate students will analyze a case study; present it to the class; a,nd provide a 10-15 page written report on the case study analysis to the instructor. Prerequisites: CIS 301 and MGMT 320 or permission of instructor.|
MGMT 482
Collect Bargaining
A study of the negotiation and scope of collective bargaining contracts; the substance of bargaining power and institutional goals are applied in the resolution of industrial conflict. Prerequisite: MGMT 324. At least once every three semesters.|
MGMT 483
Compensation Management
A study of the processes in analyzing, developing, implementing, administering, and performing on-going evaluation of a total compensation and benefit system for all organizational groups. Prerequisite: MGMT 324.|
MGMT 485
Labor Rel & Pub Policy
Examines the industrial relations functions as they relate to federal, state, and local statutes and industrial policies. Includes OSHA, EEOA, NLRA, LMRA, and LMRDA, workers' compensation, and unemployment compensation. Prerequisite: MGMT 324.|
MGMT 486
Occupat Safety Mgmt
Provides students with information concerning management techniques, government regulations and safety, and health program development within organizational settings. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 499
Special Topics: Mgmt
Presents various current topics affecting management practice or theory. Different topics may be covered from year to year as subjects of critical importance or interest occur. Prerequisites: Junior standing and MGMT 320.|
MGMT 500
Mgmt Theory and Practice
Focuses on the development of management thought and its application. Includes planning, organizing, controlling, decision-making, motivation, leadership, work groups, and organizational change and development. Considers the domestic and internationa,l environments and changing societal values.|
MGMT 521
Leadership & Organization
Studies the ways in which leaders, groups and individuals interact in organizations and how leadership plays important roles in organizations in today's business environments. Covers various leadership and organization issues including theoretical f,oundations of leadership and organizations, roles of top management, corporate governance, organizationoal culture and change, stakeholder analysis, leading and managing groups, motivation and influence, satisfaction, and leadership development. Int,roduces students' business competency portfolios. Prerequisites: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 570
Project Management
Introduces students to basic project management concepts and reinforces those concepts through the use of project management software. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize and control projects. Key topics incl,ude monitoring and controlling schedules, progress reporting, risk management, quality management, cost management as well as contracting and procurement. Graduate students will analyze a case study; present it to the class; and provide a 10-15 page, written report on the case study analysis to the instructor. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or MGMT 500.|
MGMT 621
Human Resources Mgmt
A study of human resources management issues and practices in business organizations. Topics covered include the analysis and design of jobs, staffing the organization, training, and development of employees, and the design and administration of comp,ensation systems. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 622
Multinational Business
A study of the nature, organization, and operation of multinational firms. Selected cases of foreign operations of multinational corporations are discussed and analyzed. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 625
Negotiations/Arbitrat
A synthesis of industrial relations theory and practice. The union/employer relationship will be explored from the union organization drive through the continued negotiation of collective bargaining agreements, and attendant grievance arbitration pro,cedures. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MGMT 626
Operations Mgmt & Info Systems
Addresses the understanding of how business information systems and business operations, with special emphasis on supply chain management, are integrated and managed in the modern enterprise. Utilizes both live-case and classroom instruction to faci,litate student understanding of the material. Prerequisite: BSAD 503.|
MGMT 650
Quality Management
Examines Total Quality Management (TQM), including the philosophies and principles of Deming, Juran, and Crosby. Focuses on the management and continuous improvement of quality and productivity in manufacturing and service organizations. Includes qua,lity measurement, quality assurance, giving employees responsibility for quality, the team approach to quality, employee recognition, and various TQM tools and techniques. Prerequisite: MGMT 320.|
MKTG 160
Contemp Issues In Mktg
Introduces contemporary issues in marketing and e-marketing in society and the world. Includes discussion of and composition of themes dealing with the impact of marketing on the society, its values, and the individual. May not be used to satisfy cor,e or major requirements for degrees in business administration. Students who have passed MKTG 360 may not schedule this course. B.S.B.A. majors may apply this course only as a free elective. On demand.|
MKTG 360
Prin Of Marketing
The process in our society by which needs and wants of consumers are anticipated and satisfied. An examination of a systems approach to and analysis of the organizational function and the set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering v,alue to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders. Students develop an understanding of the increasing complexity of the modern marketing system, why it is essential, and how it perf,orms in both domestic and international marketing situations. Prerequisites: ECON 175 or 212, and junior standing. Each semester.|
MKTG 361
Marketing Management
A study of coordinative effort in planning, organizing, and controlling marketing and e-marketing activities that direct the flow of goods and services from producer to consumer. Prerequisite: MKTG 360. On demand.|
MKTG 362
Retail Management
Introduces students to the field of retailing and e-tailing where they will study such areas as organizational structure, merchandising practices and procedures, promotional activities, store planning, control, etc. Prerequisite: MKTG 360, or instruc,tor approval. On demand.|
MKTG 363
Advertising Management
Examines the uses of advertising and advertising campaigns by business and e-business which give emphasis to the patterns and types of marketing strategy and its various functions, legal and moral obligations, problems in developing and evaluating ad,vertising programs, budgeting, scheduling, and client-advertising agency relationship. Prerequisite: MKTG 360. On demand.|
MKTG 366
Channels Of Distribution
Examines factors involved in the selection of marketing and e-marketing channels and problems involved in managing the task efficiently. Prerequisite: MKTG 360. On demand.|
MKTG 369
Services Marketing
Offers upper-level business students the opportunity to study effective approaches to marketing and e-marketing of services. Includes non-profit and commercial organizations. Utilizes a case study, discussion methodology to study the conceptual back,ground of services marketing. Prerequisite: MKTG 360; junior standing. On demand.|
MKTG 374
Real Estate Mktg & Brokerage
Examines real estate marketing and brokerage management. Topics include the regulatory environment, marketing, advertising, sales management, and personal selling. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: RE 271 or permission of Instructor. Offered biennially,.|
MKTG 461
Marketing Research
Examines the application of scientific and statistical methods and tools to the solution of marketing and e-marketing problems. Prerequisites: ECON 221, 222, and MKTG 360.|
MKTG 462
Personal Selling & Sales Mgmt
Covers the process of personal selling and all aspects of the management of a sales force, including the selection and testing of sales representatives, training, devising compensation plans and expense accounts, territories, quotas, and evaluation., E-marketing topics are discussed. Prerequisite: MKTG 360. On demand.|
MKTG 463
Gender Issues In Mktg
Designed for both men and women. Explores the changing business, e-business, organizational, and marketing environments as they pertain to the increasing number of women in marketing. Examines the special problems and opportunities for women in marke,ting. Prerequisites: MKTG 360 and junior standing. On demand.|
MKTG 465
Marketing Problems
Utilizes the case and/or simulation gaming methods to consider the problems faced by the producer and reseller, including traditional marketing and e-marketing issues. Prerequisites: MKTG 360 and senior standing.|
MKTG 468
Buyer Behavior
Examines theories, models, recent research, and research techniques in consumer motivation and decision making, and buyer-seller interaction, including consumer buyers, business and organizational buyers. Includes traditional consumer marketing, bus,iness-to-business and e-marketing issues. Prerequisites: MKTG 360 and PSY 211 or permission of the instructor. On demand.|
MKTG 469
International Marketing
Analytical approach to study marketing and e-marketing management decisions involving multinational operations. Focuses on the management of the marketing functions within the multinational corporation. Prerequisite: MKTG 360. On demand.|
MKTG 471
Real Estate Market & Invest An
Provides the necessary background to evaluate prospective real estate investment analysis. Examines both financial and non-financial aspects of investing in real property including risk, market analysis, portfolio impacts, and income taxation conseq,uences. Prerequisites: RE 271. Offered biennially.|
MKTG 491
E-Marketing
The study of concepts, vocabulary, and contemporary practices in e-marketing management including e-marketing planning,e-marketing mix decision-making, ethical and legal issues affecting the environment of e-marketing.|
MKTG 495
Special Topics
Presents various current topics that affect marketing practice or theory. Topics differ from year to year as subjects of critical importance arise. Prerequisite: MKTG 360 or permission of the instructor.|
MKTG 500
Prin of Marketing
The process in our society by which needs and wants of consumers are anticipated and satisfied. An examination of a systems approach to and analysis of the organizational function and the set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering v,alue to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders. Students develop an understanding of the increasing complexity of the modern marketing system, why it is essential, and how it perf,orms in both domestic and international marketing situations. Prerequisites: ECON 175 or 212, and junior standing.|
MKTG 560
Mktg Decision Making
The analysis of marketing concepts and problems from a managerial point of view. Emphasis is placed upon planning, organizing, and controlling of marketing and e-marketing activities and their integration with the objectives and policies of the firm., Both domestic and multinational marketing concepts are addressed in this course. Prerequisite: MKTG 360 and ECON 222.|
MKTG 562
Channels Of Distributions
A study of components of a vertical marketing system and of the methods for making them effective. Also included are means of evaluating alternative marketing systems and the development of international marketing channels as well as e-marketing syst,ems. Prerequisite: MKTG 360.|
MKTG 570
RE Market and Invest Analysis
This course will examine the fundamentals of real estate analysis. It will explore real property law, appraisal, finance, market and investment analysis, and property management.|
MKTG 604
Marketing Research
Methods of solving marketing research problems, including library, survey, and experimental research methods; project design; data collection, analysis, and interpretation; presentation of marketing research reports for managerial user. Problems in i,nternational marketing research, e-marketing research, and research ethics are also included. Selection, design, and completion of a marketing-oriented research project and computer work are required. Prerequisite: ECON 603.|
MKTG 661
Marketing Strat
tudy of strategies for attaining a suitable ?marketing mix? for various types of entities including e-marketers. Marketing knowledge from previous courses and experiences will be applied to the formation of overall programs for dealing with both inte,rnational and domestic marketing problems. Prerequisite: MKTG 360.|
MMAJ 100
Intro To Mass Media
Systematic study of mass media and their support industries. Includes historical and critical perspectives of legal, ethical and social issues surrounding the influence of the mass media on audiences, characteristics and functions of the mass media,,career options, employment trends, and competencies required of a mass media professionals. Each semester.|
MMAJ 101
Mass Media And Society
Investigates elements of the relationship between the mass media, message producers, and their audience, including effects of mass media messages (aural, visual, and textual media). Covers the media professions, and explores variables including mess,age meaning, environment, and technology. Requires students to apply theoretical concepts to practical problems. Each semester.|
MMAJ 140
Writing For Media
Develops fundamental skills in writing and/or visualizing for a variety of media forms. Emphasizes print and broadcast newswriting, advertising copywriting, and public relations writing. Prerequisite: ENG 111 or consent of instructor. Each semester.|
MMAJ 202
Media Production Planning
MMAJ 202, Media Production Planning is a survey class of Graphic Design, Web, Film and Video production processes. Students will learn specific steps for those types of productions as well as how those processes can help to coordinate projects in Ad,vertising, Public Relations, Journalism and other media. Students will also learn real-world management principles, and fundamental budgeting and scheduling skills. Prerequisite: MMAJ 270|
MMAJ 208
Intro To Film
This course is designed to help the student become literate in the language of film. It will introduce terminology, history, theory and technology of film. The student will take a critical look at the cinema, and will analyze the theory and techniq,ues used by directors and writers, critique a variety of works in a number of film genres.|
MMAJ 249
News Reporting
This course develops basic reporting skills for beginning journalism students including interviewing, gathering and verifying information, covering a beat, and coverage of various types of news. The focus of the course is to help students develop in,-field news reporting techniques. Prerequisite: MMAJ 140|
MMAJ 270
Temporal Media
Provides initial instruction on communicating via motion and passage of time. Includes the syntax of motion and production techniques in video and animation. Each semester.|
MMAJ 302
Film Production Planning
This course is designed to give the student practice instruction in the process of film production. All aspects of film production are covered from pre-production to post-production, including location scouting, casting sessions and on-location stag,ing. Special emphasis is placed on roles and responsibilities of personnel.|
MMAJ 311
Broadcasting Prin & Pract
Overview of the broadcasting industry, including history, technical aspects, station and network organization, sales, ratings, programming, and social and ethical influences. A foundation course for radio-TV career preparation, related fields of comm,unication, and the development of knowledgeable consumers of broadcast media. Prerequisites: COMM 100. Annually|
MMAJ 312
P R Prin & Practice
Provides fundamental instruction in public relations practices, including program planning and evaluation, working with the media, writing for public relations, and coordinating special events and functions. Explores the structure, ethics, and proces,s of public relations in business, institutions, and American society through readings and discussion. Prerequisite: COMM 100 and grade of C or above in MMAJ 140. Note: Undergraduate students completing COMM 312 may enroll in COMM 551. Annually|
MMAJ 313
Journalism Prin & Pract
Examines the history and theory of the practice of journalism paying particular attention to First Amendment issues, the language of the media, changing conditions of information, ethics, and closely examining the role and organizations of a democrat,ic press. Prerequisite: MMAJ 100 or 101.|
MMAJ 314
Advertising Prin And Practices
Introduces students to the basic principles, theories and applications of the advertising field. Examines advertisings historical background, planning and management, media strategies, creative development, international issues, and social and legal, effects. Prerequisite: MMAJ 100 or MMAJ 101|
MMAJ 320
Communication Research
Introduces students to quantitative research principles guiding mass communication professionals working in areas such as broadcasting, public relations, advertising and journalism. Topics include audience measurement principles, polling research, su,rvey construction and analysis, focus group research, mass media content analysis, and statistical analysis. Calculator required. Prerequisites: MMAJ 100 or 101.|
MMAJ 324
New Mass Media Tech & Prof
Introduces students to new mass media technologies that are changing the role of mass communication professionals working in broadcasting, public relations, advertising, and journalism. Topics include evolving mass media implementations of the Intern,et to reach audiences, evolving copyright issues and their impact on the mass media; discussion of new World Wide Web technologies such as animation formats, streaming media, and digital video production; new digital technologies and formats for broa,dcasting, and new multimedia technologies. Developing careers and challenges to older professions will be discussed in the context of mass media industry trends. Prerequisite: MMAJ 100 or 101. On demand.|
MMAJ 331
Media Ethics & Responsibility
Prepares future professional communicators to make informed media decisions. Provides a historical, legal, cultural, and philosophical context for judgment of continuing and emerging issues in mass media fields, and creates an experimental frame thro,ugh discussion, simulation, and modeling. No prerequisites.|
MMAJ 339
Global Mass Communication
Enables students to effectively interact with the new culturally diverse audience and workforce in the American business and industry. Covers the latest innovatively designed resources on cultural diversity, global mass communication competencies, an,d positive attitudes. Includes imaginative conceptualization techniques of designing mass media messages suited to the new realities of cultural diversity. Prerequisite: Junior standing.|
MMAJ 340
Newswriting
Explores the principles and practice of evaluating, gathering, and writing the fundamental news story and news feature. Includes the preparation of copy for publication, interviewing, and laboratory experience. Prerequisite: MMAJ 140|
MMAJ 341
Publications Editing
Provides fundamental instruction in editing skills, copy editing, headline writing, typography, photographs, copy control, and layout. Examines the role and responsibilities of the editor. Prerequisite: MMAJ 140.|
MMAJ 344
Investigative Journalism
Focuses on the skill and techniques used to gather in-depth information for investigative reporting. Students will learn interviewing research, and organizational skills. In addition, the legalities and practicalities of information access will be,covered. All of these skills will culminate in the production of an investigative journalism project spanning both written and recorded media. Prerequisite: MMAJ 202 and 340.|
MMAJ 345
Newswriting for Internet Media
This course develops reporting, writing and editing skills for internet delivery. Students understand the continuum of the cycle of news demanded by internet news sources, and the fundamental differences between online and traditional media. The int,ernet requires reporters and writers to think differently about the structure, appearance and detail in news stories. Students will report, write and edit news stories for the internet that are interactive and nonlinear. Prerequisite: MMAJ 140|
MMAJ 351
Field Production
Provides students with training in television production and experience in the application of communication theory and production techniques. Integrates skills in writing, photography, audio and graphics in a total production context. Prerequisite:, MMAJ 270.|
MMAJ 353
Studio Production
Develop basic skills in studio production techniques, including producing, crew positions, lighting, and on-camera talent. Prerequisite: MMAJ 270.|
MMAJ 354
Audio Production
Covers theory and advanced techniques of audio production for radio and video, from conception through completion, emphasizing multitrack, non-destructive and non-linear production. Prerequisite: MMAJ 270.|
MMAJ 355
Cinematography
This course further develops skills in digital/film production by examining the use of lenses, light meters, advanced lighting techniques, and low-tech special effects. Students produce a number of projects that employ thesetechniques. The student,will be able to provide shooting and lighting support to any kind of production and create a DVD resume reel.|
MMAJ 357
Digital/Film Editing
This course is designed to introduce and research the various aspects of digital and film postproduction editing. The course will include the aestheitcs and techniques of editing, application of editin techniques on Final Cut Pro, the video signal a,nd components, and the role of the editor. Final Cut Pro certification is possible upon successful completion of this course and the Final Cut Prio certification exam.|
MMAJ 370
Narrative Structure
This course examines narrative screenwriting through all components of story and mythic structure and exemplar film scripts. Character development in relation to narrative structures is studies. Substantial writing is realized in the production of,a synopsis, treatment and other pieces in preparation of a feature-length film script. Several major script components are also written.|
MMAJ 371
Publications Design
This course teaches principles of visual communication in print and electronic publications. Students gain design and production skills through extensive application of these principles to a wide variety of publications. Prerequisite: MMAJ 140.|
MMAJ 372
Screenwriting
This course is designed to concentrate on the development, execution and formatting of a narrative short script. Designed in a lecture/workshop format, students will produce a polished log line, synopsis, treatment, character profiles, and twenty-mi,nute screenplay, The course will also cover distribution, marketing strategies, and pitching a script.|
MMAJ 375
Photography
Provides basic principles of photography and intermediate principles of photojournalism. Study of camera and digital photography processing using programs such as Photoshop including the production of photographes for news, advertising, scientific, a,nd instructional use. Camera required. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.|
MMAJ 417
Public Relations Campaigns
This course explores the processes of public relations research, strategic planning, tactics and evaluation in creating and managing PR campaigns. Students will integrate theory and professional skills by analyzing existing PR campaigns and current,events. The course culminates in a PR campaign that students create for an actual client. Prerequisites: MMAJ 140, MMAJ 312 and MMAJ 443 with a grade of C or above in each course.|
MMAJ 418
Advertising Campaign
Provides theory and skills to create an advertising campaign for a selected product or service. Students will study and analyze existing advertising campaigns, write creative briefs, and conduct media planning and research. Students will learn to uti,lize traditional media (print, broadcast and outdoor), as well as nontraditional media (the Internet and other interactive media) to create effective campaigns. The course culminates in a comprehensive advertising campaign that students create for an, actual client. Prerequisites: MMAJ 140, MMAJ 314 and MMAJ 446, with a grade of C or above in each course.|
MMAJ 422
Communication Law
Introduces students to legal principles guiding mass communication professionals working in areas such as broadcasting, public relations, advertising, and journalism. Includes legal principles related to freedom of the press, libel, privacy, copyrigh,t, access to government documents, the rules and regulations of the Federal Communications Commission and the Federal Trade Commission, and the impact of new media technologies on legal principles concerning First Amendment, copyright, privacy, and m,ass media regulations. Prerequisites: COMM 100 and 101. Each semester.|
MMAJ 424
Mass Media Critical Analysis
Explores critical methodologies and analysis of electronic media content and programming, emphasizing aesthetic, historical, social, cultural, and industrial factors affecting audience response. Prerequisite: MMAJ 100 or 101|
MMAJ 425
Mass Communication Theory
Provides survey and evaluation of current theories of mass communication, examining the role and application of each in mass media products, development and industries. Students explore theories relative to the emergence of the mass press, the effec,ts of mass communication, and media in contemporary society. Prerequisite: COMM 100|
MMAJ 426
Telecommunications Policy
Provides a foundation in the U.S. policymaking process in telecommunications (broadcasting, cable, telephone, and the Internet). Examines the impact of technology and social influences on policymaking and the theoretical perspectives that drive poli,cymaking. Prerequisite: MMAJ 100 or 101|
MMAJ 427
Ethnicity, Gender & The Media
This course investigates the role of ethnicity and gender in a variety of media. The course critically analyzes how the media have historically portrayed women and people of color, how they portray these groups today in a diverse, global media envir,onment, and how these portrayals have influenced public opinion and public policy. The course also examines the historical and current role of women and minority communities in the media business.|
MMAJ 430
Public Relations Ethics
Addresses ethics and professional responsibility in public relations. Through study of theory, cases and current events, students will learn to identify the ethical and moral dimensions of issues that arise in the practice of public relations. Studen,ts will gain the knowledge and skills necessary to reach and justify ethical decisions, and a sense of personal and professional responsibility. Prerequisites: MMAJ 140, MMAJ 312 and MMAJ 443, with a grade of C or above in each course. Annually|
MMAJ 438
Media Design For Organizations
Develops skills in devising communication strategies to design and develop an organization's media programs for training purposes. Skill areas include drafting communication objectives, developing plans for using communication media for training, and, evaluating communication media used for effectiveness. Emphasizes applying skills to produce communication media for training programs. Prerequisite: COMM 320 or permission of instructor.|
MMAJ 441
Adv Media Writing
Extensive work in research, writing, and marketing of written products for magazines, newspapers, and other publications. Requires selection and acquisition of appropriate photographs and graphics to complement the articles. Prerequisites: MMAJ 140.,Spring, annually.|
MMAJ 442
Newswriting Electronic Media
Provides students with advanced instruction and experience in writing and reporting news for radio and television. Topics include script types and formats, leads, writing for the eye and ear, interviewing techniques, feature writing, packages, reade,rs and teasers and investigative research and reporting techniques. Prerequisites: MMAJ 140.|
MMAJ 443
Public Relations Writing
Provides students with instruction and experience in writing for the public relations and advertising professions. Projects include news releases, media kits, advertisements, newsletters, brochures, and web pages. Coursework also stresses ethical and, legal responsibilities of the public relations writer, research, persuasion, and visual elements of communication. Prerequisites: MMAJ 100 or 101, and 140.|
MMAJ 444
WWW Publication Design
Develops competencies in writing and editing copy for World Wide Web media. Students will learn to structure web sites, layout copy, use color and text effectively, position images, and deploy sound and video. Students develop skills in editing publi,c relations, advertising, and news-oriented web sites. Prerequisite: MMAJ 371 or permission of instructor. On demand.|
MMAJ 445
Digital/Film Producing
This course will explore all aspects of the role of the producer for film. The student will examine the business of film production, from the development of script proposals through final distribution. The student will become involved in all areas,of script breakdown, storyboard development, planning, budgets and legal aspects.Prerequisite MMAJ 302|
MMAJ 446
Advertising Copywriting
Introduces student to the theories and skills required to write effective advertising copy to market products, services and ideas. Students will learn copywriting techniques for media forms that are both traditional (print, broadcast and outdoor), as, well as nontraditional (Internet and other interactive media). Topics include research, creative concepts and execution. Prerequisites: MMAJ 312 or MMAJ 314.|
MMAJ 448
Integrated Comm Campaigns
This course provides theory and skills to create an integrated communication campaign for a selected product, company, person or service. Students will explore the processes of research, strategic planning, tactics and evaluation in creating and man,aging integrated communication campaigns. Students will study and analyze existing campaigns and the course culminates in an integrated communication campaign developed for an actual client. The integrated approach to campaigns assists students in,practicing skills in public relations and advertising. Prerequisite: MMAJ 443 or MMAJ 446.|
MMAJ 455
Digital/Film Directing
This course is designed to provide the students with hands-on experience as a single camera director. Students will critique professional directors and examine directing theories and techniques. Students will apply theory and techniques of script b,reakdown, directing talent and blocking, camera placement, shot execution and communication of the director's vision to crew and talent. Students will direcy a narrative short or one-act screenplay.|
MMAJ 473
Documentary Film
This course surveys the history, theory and style/genres of documentaries and reviews documentary production techniques culminating in individual student ten to twenty minute documentary productions. Prerequisites: MMAJ 445 and MMAJ 455|
MMAJ 474
Advanced Web Site Design
Provides students with advanced design strategies and techniques for implementing world wide web sites. Topics include advanced strategies for structuring web sites aimed at journalism, broadcasting, corporate, and public relations functions, structu,ral designs to meet a variety of audience needs, working with advanced web design layout strategies and techniques, and implementing web-based multimedia formats. Prerequisite: COMM 444. On demand.|
MMAJ 475
Presentation Graphics
Design and production of graphic materials for the presentation of information in training sessions, sales and stockholder meetings, and other small and large group situations. May be taken concurrently with SCT 214.|
MMAJ 476
Short Film
A film production course. Students will make up a crew that will produce a feature-style film short. The capstone course in the film concentration applies previous coursework and experience to the creation of a major work and will allow students th,e full expression of the concentration. Prerequisite: MMAJ 445, 455.|
MMAJ 482
Internship
Students apply theory and techniques to communication tasks of a cooperating business, industry, agency, or institution. Students must obtain approval of a detailed proposal before registering for the course. The determination of credit hour producti,on is to be made in consultation with the internship advisor, in compliance with the media organization's policies, and in consideration of the intensity of the internship experience. Prerequisites: 80 credits completed, and a minimum of 2.5 QPA.|
MMAJ 491
Independent Study
Allows imaginative students to structure an independent research project in the area of communication with a minimum of faculty supervision. A proposal specifying objectives, methods, and evaluation techniques must be submitted to and approved by the, student's advisor and dean.|
MMAJ 495
Senior Portfolio
This capstone course enables students to develop their work utilizing the theory and application techniques of planning, writing, producing and directing to complete their digital/film portfolio for the B.F.A. exhibit. Prerequisites: MMAJ 4455 and,MMAJ 455|
MMAJ 499
Special Topics
Focuses on a single, broad contemporary topic of current interest in communication and related fields. Course content varies from semester to semester. Topics to be considered will be announced in advance. May be taken three times for credit.|
MMAJ 524
Crit Analy Of Mass Media
This course focuses on critical frames of analysis applied to various mass media messages, such as film, recordings, television, and print media. Rhetorical, semiotic, idealogical, and dramatistic modes of analysis are applied in historical and curr,ent media contexts. Focus may be made on a specific medium.|
MMAJ 525
Mass Communication Theory
This course provides introduction and examination of the major theories relevant in the study of mass communication. Students understand the application and relevance of these theories in the industries, practices and effects of the mass media.|
MMAJ 540
Prin Of Inst Design & Ed Tech
This course focuses on systematic procedures for designing, developing, evaluating and revising instruction to meet identified goals and objectives for promoting educational technology. Instructional design theories and applications will be examined,. The appropriateness and production of both projected and non-projected multimedia will be explored in the production of instructional solutions for the targeted audience including the K-12 community and other training and development learning envi,ronments. Fall, annually.|
MMAJ 548
Media Strat For Distance Comm
This course will explore the various media strategies used to deliver distance learning and other distance communications. Learners will examine the various modes of delivering information from printed correspondence to the newer media technologies.,Media will be analyzed to determine the best delivery system for specific audiences and various communication goals. Every other year.|
MMAJ 551
Public Relations Foundations
Focuses on the roles and responsibilities of public relations professionals, theories and prniciples of public relations, and public relations programming. Students will work to develop knowledge, expertise and skills that lead to professional compet,ence in the field. As part of their study, students will also consider the legal and ethical dimensions of public relations.|
MMAJ 552
Journalism Foundations
Provides students with a historical, theoretical and practical overview of the traditional principles and practices of journalism and an analysis of the applicability of those characteristics in today's media environment. This course will focus on a, critical examination of the history, principles and practices of American journalism. It will address the functions of the press in a democratic society, and students will examine the structure and nature of the press and media's relationship with,government and the public.|
MMAJ 556
Trng Pgm Plan & Design
Investigates various theories of learning and instructional strategies used in training in corporate organizations and educational environments. The participant will identify a method appropriate to his or her content area, and plan and design an ins,tructional system suited to adult learners in an in-service training environment.|
MMAJ 558
Society, Law & Media Tch
This course will examine the social impact and regulation of media technology in society. The course will explore the relationships between societal uses of media technology, the law that addresses media technology issues and the role of media in lar,ger communication and mass media systems. Every other year.|
MMAJ 559
Mgmt Comm Process
This course will define and apply the general principles of management-planning, organizing, staffing, directing and controlling - to the design and administration of communication organizations and communication functions. This course relates behavi,oral variables to the understanding and motivation of employees.|
MMAJ 560
Audio & Tv Production
Develops basic skills in audio, ENG, and television production. A variety of projects in both media concentrates on proper equipment operation and recording and editing techniques.|
MMAJ 565
Photo & Grahic Prod
Provides an integrated introduction into graphic and photographic production techniques. Layout, design, and composition techniques will be developed.|
MMAJ 572
Design Www Media
This course will prepare students to design web-based media. Students will learn to structure web sites, layout copy, use color and text effectively, position images, and deploy sound and video on pages as necessary.|
MMAJ 573
Publ Relat Ethics & Prof Resp
Addresses the ethical and moral dimensions of the public relations practice, and prepares students to understand the ethical responsibilities of the public relations professional. Through case studies, analysis of current events, and hands-on exerci,ses, this course provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to reach and justify ethical decisions in a range of situations. Throughout, students work to build a sense of personal and professional responsibility in public relations.,Prerequisite: MMAJ 551|
MMAJ 574
Publ Rela Cases & Campaigns
Using public relations cases and campaigns as models, this course examines the development of public relations strategies along with the tactical communications and actions that were instituted to achieve organizational goals. Public relations progr,ams directed toward employees, the news media, the community, the consumer, governmental officials and agencies, stockholders and other relevant groups are included in the course. Prerequisite: MMAJ 551|
MMAJ 575
Prin of Integrated Comm
This course examines the theories and techniques of integrated communications, including public relations, advertising, marketing, sales promotions, and personal selling. It explores how all forms of communications work together to achieve organizat,ional objectives and contribute to its overall brand. In this course, students will also learn how to research and evaluate a company's marketing and promotional situation, and use this information to develop effective integrated communications stra,tegies and programs. Prerequisite: MMAJ 551|
MMAJ 580
Applied Design & Prod
This course will prepare students to design and produce multimedia programs for communication functions. It will explore the research concerning interactive multimedia as a delivery medium, and examine key elements of program design, pre-production,, production, and evaluation.|
MMAJ 591
Independent Study
Allows the imaginative student to structure an independent research project in the area of communication with a minimum of faculty supervision. A proposal specifying objectives, methods, and evaluation techniques must be submitted and approved by the, student?s advisor prior to enrolling in the course. 1 or 2 credit hours.|
MMAJ 599
Special Topics
Focuses on a single, broad contemporary topic of current interest in communication and related fields. Course content varies from semester to semester. Topics to be considered wil be announced in advance. May be taken three times for credit. No p,rerequisite.|
MMAJ 621
Mass Comm Research
Examines research in mass communication and develops competencies in research methods. Topics include statistical analysis, experimental and survey research methods in communication, content analysis, and evaluation of mass media technology in commu,nication.|
MMAJ 641
Professional Comm Writing
This course provides advanced instruction in communication writing for use in a range of media-related careers. It focuses on the methodology and execution of specific projects professionals are likely to encounter in the workplace including speeche,s, grants, visual presentations and research reports. Prerequisities: COMM 551, COMM 525|
MMAJ 642
Adv Public Relations Writing
Provides advanced instruction in writing for the public relations profession. Focuses on the methodology and execution of specific projects including news releases and media kits, crisis communication plans, backgrounders, annual reports, feature st,ories, speeches and presentations, and websites. Stresses planning and research, message strategy, and ethical and legal responsibilities. Students will produce written pieces suitable for a professional portfolio. Prerequisite: MMAJ 551|
MMAJ 650
Adv Technology Applications
This course develops advanced skills to support instructional technology programs. Coursework will cover areas such as advanced microcomputer applications, internet concepts as they apply to instructional technology, and PC operating system issues re,lated to instructional technology. The focus will be on computers and related technologies used in educational and training environments. Prerequisite: COMM 545, or permission of instructor. Summers/spring annually.|
MMAJ 651
Deploying Info Tech Infras
Focuses on the strategies involved in the provisioning and maintenance of information technology infrastructure. Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, organize, implement and control information technology resources. Key, topics include identifying information infrastructure; defining the range of information technology leadership roles; and illustrating current best practices for managing information technology assets. Offered annually.|
MMAJ 657
Adv Appl Design & Prod
Incorporates advanced design and production skills. Students produce more complex communication materials for multimedia projects. Prerequisites: COMM 580 or permission of instructor.|
MMAJ 692
Sem In Comm Ed & Mass Media
Focuses on critical examination of issues, research, and innovations in the field of communication education and mass media technology.|
MMAJ 700
Thesis
Requires the student to conduct a research study in communication, using acceptable research methods and under the supervision of a faculty member and committee; permission to enroll in this course is by invitation of the graduate faculty in the Depa,rtment of Communication. This course is one of three options to complete the degree requirements in the graduate program. Prerequisite: COMM 621. Three or six credits a semester for an overall total of six credits.|
MMAJ 701
Comm Internship
Provides practical experience in the supervision and operations of some aspect of a communication/ instructional system program. A proposal specifying objectives, methods, and evaluation techniques must be submitted and approved by the student's adv,isor and the cooperating agency prior to enrolling in the course. The course is one of three options to complete degree requirements in the graduate program. Students may take three credits in two consecutive semesters or six credits in one semester,. Prerequisite: MMAJ 621.|
MMAJ 702
Communication Portfolio
Requires student to prepare a portfolio of professional materials, including written documentation outlining the purpose and application of the materials. Students will produce professional-quality media products, such as video programs, multimedia,programs, printed materials, audio programs, or web-based products. Students enrolled in this course must also complete a comprehensive examination. This course is one of three options to complete degree requirements in the graduate program. Prere,quisite: MMAJ 621|
MS 110
Intro To Military Science
Surveys the organization of the United States Army and the role of the military in today's society, emphasizing the customs and traditions of the Army and the fundamentals of leadership. Students study land navigation, physical fitness, and military, bearing; values and ethics, Army Life and communications. Leadership labs reinforce classroom instruction.|
MS 112
Fund Of Military Science
A progressive course that explores concepts that must be applied by the officer corps of the United States Army. Students learn basic soldier skills and leadership techniques and gain an appreciation for teh institutional values and procedures that,define the Professional Army Ethic.|
MS 201
Fund Tact Oper & Leader Tech
For the second year Military Science student. Designed to provide practical application of fundamental leadership techniques in preparation for the advanced course of Military Science and future service as an Officer in the U.S. Army. Students will, learn oral and written communication skills and leadership fundamentals in the classroom, practicing them at weekly leadership labs. The goal of the curriculum and training is to enhance supervisory skills that can be applied in a management positi,on in a civilian or military career. The focus will be on individual leadership development and small group leadership techniques used to train and motivate teams within larger organizations.|
MS 202
Natl Sec & Fund Mil Topography
The study of national security concepts, policies, and the national decision-making process with emphasis on national resources, national will, and economic factors, included will be a study of response options. Fundamentals of military topography i,ncluding the use of military maps to determine topographic features, to conduct land navigation, and to perform terrain analysis will be covered. Also, see Leadership Laboratory.|
MS 301
Leadership in Modern Learning
A progressive course where students conduct practical application of principles of leadership/management as applied in classroom and field to include case studies in psychological, physiological, and sociological factors that affect human behavior.,Individually and in groups, students solve leadership problems common to small units. Students participate in class and in Leadership Labs. The Military science department provides the textbook for the class, titled Leadership and Problem Solving,,MS 301 and all other materials and uniforms required for the course.|
MS 302
Adv Ldrshp Plan & Mod Combat
A progressive course where students continue the practical application of principles of leadership/management as applied in classroom and field environments. It offers an analysis of the leader's role in directing and coordinating efforts of individ,uals and small units in the execution of offensive and defensive tactical missions, to include command and control systems, the military team, and communications techniques. Students participate in class and in Leadership Labs. The Military science, department provides the textbook for the class, titled Leadership and Ethics, MS 302 and all other materials and uniforms required for the course.|
MS 305
Fund Of Organ Leadership
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MS 401
Mgmt of Military Complex
A progressive course where students conduct practical application of principles of leadership/management as applied in the classroom and the field. Continues the leader development process and prepares cadets for the transition from cadet to second,lieutenant, solidifying their commitment to officership, reinforcing individual competencies, and affording practical officer leadership experience. By the end of the course, cadets will have a better understanding of a wide range of military operat,ions and their purposes. Individually and in groups, students solve leadership problems common to small units. Students participate in class and in Leadership Labs. The Military science department provides the textbook for the class, titled Leader|
MS 402
Sem In Military Mgmt & Anal
A progressive course where students continue the practical application of principles of leadership/management as applied in classroom and field environments. Students analyze the use of military assets in world affairs to include importance of strat,egic mobility and neutralization of insurgent movements. Students assess and solve management problems regarding military justice, administration, and the obligations and responsibilities of an officer. Students participate in class and in Leadersh,ip Labs. The Military science department provides the textbook for the class, titled Officership, MS 402 and all other materials and uniforms required for the course.|
MT 401
Clin Micro
Explores identification and clinical pathology of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. Presents techniques to isolate, stain, culture, and determine antimicrobial susceptibility. Includes instrumentation and quality control.|
MT 402
Clin Chem
Examines enzymology, endocrinology, biochemistry of lipids, carbohydrates and proteins, metabolism of nitrogenous end products, physiology and metabolism of fluids and electrolytes, and toxicology as related to the body and diseases. Includes colorim,etry, spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, chromatography, automation, and quality control.|
MT 403
Clin Hemo
Analyzes the composition and functions of blood; diseases related to blood disorders; the role of platelets and coagulation. Includes manual and automated techniques of diagnostic tests for abnormalities.|
MT 404
Clin Imm
Examines blood antigens, antibodies, crossmatching, hemolytic diseases, and related diagnostic tests. Includes an in-depth study of blood donor service and its many facets such as transfusions, medico-legal aspects, etc.|
MT 405
Clin Imm/Serv
Explores immune response, immunoglobulins, autoimmunity and complement, and related tests and diseases. Includes survey and demonstration of serological diagnostic tests.|
MT 406
Clin Seminar
Other courses which are not included in the above (such as orientation, laboratory management, education, clinical microscopy) are unique to the individual hospital program.|
MUS 110
Appled Music Seminar
Student recital series satisfies departmental requirement. All music students must elect this course Each semester in residence as an extension of their curricular and performance activities. Music majors experience and/or perform music literature of, all periods appropriate to their instrument or voice.|
MUS 111
Intro To Music
Introduces the enjoyment and understanding of music. Uses recordings, concerts, and other media. No prerequisite courses or special abilities required. Each semester.|
MUS 112
Intro To African-Ame Mus
Introduces the enjoyment and understanding of African-American music. Uses audio-visual materials to provide examples of musical styles presented. Non-performance course. No prerequisites. Each semester.|
MUS 113
History Of Rock Music
Surveys rock music from its origins to the present. Focuses on musical developments within the genre, as well as, historical, sociological, literary and other cultural influences related to this subject. No prerequisite. Fall, annually.|
MUS 114
Intro To World Music
Introduces traditional and contemporary musical styles from Algeria to Zanzibar. Examines the diversity of styles such as Zouk, Soukour, Salsa, Rai, and Zydeco to name a few. Introduces the myriad of styles collectively known as World Music. No prere,quisite. Spring, annually.|
MUS 125
Found Of Musicianship
Basic training for the music major, to precede the study of MUS 126. Rigorous, hands-on course fosters mastering essential skills, including theory fundamentals, sight singing, and ear training. Intended as a prerequisite to the theory sequence curre,ntly in place. Students may be granted an exemption via a theory exam. Fall, annually.|
MUS 126
Music Theory I
Introduces fundamental elements of music construction, function, and analysis. Covers scale construction and identification, triad and seventh chord construction and identification, elements of rhythm, functional harmony, and voice leading. Prerequis,ite: Music majors or by permission. Fall, annually.|
MUS 127
Music Theory II
Continuation of Music Theory I. Provides students with fundamental knowledge of music construction and analysis. Covers voice leading, non-chord tones, diatonic seventh chords, secondary functions, modulations, phrase/period structure, cadences, and,simple forms (binary and ternary). Prerequisite: MUS 126, Grade of C or better. Spring, annually.|
MUS 128
Aural Skills I
Aural skills are essential to the success of all students studying music. Covers melodic and harmonic interval recognition, scale recognition and identification, triad recognition and identification, sight singing (melodic and rhythmic), melodic dict,ation, and rhythmic dictation. Should be taken concurrently with MUS 126. Prerequisite: Music majors or by permission. Fall, annually.|
MUS 129
Aural Skills II
Continuation of Aural Skills I. Covers interval recognition, triad and seventh chord recognition (root position and inversions), sight singing, melodic dictation, harmonic dictation, and error detection. Prerequisite: MUS 128, Grade of C or better. S,pring, annually.|
MUS 131
Fund Of Music
Examines the basic vocabulary of music fundamentals: notation, scale structures, key signatures, triads and seventh chords, rhythm and meter, harmony and its functions, intervals, sight-singing and ear training, dynamics, transposition, and practical, application by use of a keyboard instrument. No prerequisite. Each semester.|
MUS 132
Chamber Singers
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUS 160
Piano Class I
Serves two categories of students: the non-piano music major and the non-music major. The purpose for both is the same: teaching piano to beginners in such a manner that they attain an acceptable degree of elementary technical proficiency at the keyb,oard, a basic knowledge of fundamental scales and chords, and a burgeoning comprehension of the existence and desirability of musicianship. Stresses the development of basic keyboard skills and upon a musical performance on all levels of performance., Limited to 12 students; therefore the possibility exists that a non-music major may be required to reschedule the class so freshman/sophomore music majors can elect the class to meet curriculum requirements. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent backg|
MUS 161
Piano Class II
Helps students develop the ability to perform the skills begun in Piano Class I at a more advanced level. Prerequisite: MUS 160, Piano Class I, or permission of instructor. Each semester.|
MUS 182
Voice Class
Gives students an approach to vocal methods in order to eliminate problems. Teaches students to treat their voices as instruments. Designed for the student with little or no vocal training. Emphasizes development of the vocal instrument and artistic, quality at all levels of performance proficiency. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or permission of instructor.|
MUS 220
Piano Class III
Continues developing skills acquired in Piano Class II to prepare music majors for piano competency exam, including sight reading, transposition, technique, and repertoire. Prerequisite: MUS 161. Each semester.|
MUS 221
Piano Skills Seminar
Continues group instruction in preparation of the Piano Competency Exam for music majors. Continues development of functional and applied piano skills including piano technique, chording, harmonization, and accompaniment skills. Credits earned do not, apply toward graduation. Prerequisite: MUS 220 or MUSA 125. Each semester.|
MUS 224
Music In Elem Classroom
Investigates the pertinent fundamentals of music which can be incorporated by the non-music teacher. Presents pedagogical techniques that develop singing, listening, rhythm, movement, and musical skills. Equips future elementary teachers with skills,to employ a variety of musical techniques in the classroom. No prerequisites. Each semester.|
MUS 225
Integ Arts Into Elem Classroom
Investigates fundamentals of music, theatre, dance, and the visual arts which can be incorporated as primary media for communication, inquiry, and engagement by the elementary classroom teacher into instruction in other subject areas. Presents pedag,ogical techniques that address elements and standards for each arts area.|
MUS 226
Music Theory III
Continuation of Theory II. Emphasizes chromaticism and musical forms as developed in the Baroque and Classical periods. Prerequisite: MUS 127, Grade of C or better. Fall, annually.|
MUS 227
Music Theory IV
Continuation of Theory III. Emphasizes advanced harmony and analysis of musical forms from the 18th, 19th, and 20th century. Prerequisite: MUS 226, Grade of C or better. Spring, annually.|
MUS 228
Aural Skills III
Continuation of Aural Skills II. Emphasizes increasingly complex melodies, rhythmic and harmonic progressions. Prerequisite: MUS 129, Grade of C or better. Fall, annually.|
MUS 229
Aural Skills IV
Continuation of Aural Skills III. Emphasizes complex melodies (modal, tonal, and atonal), rhythmic and harmonic material. Study includes 20th models of tonal organizations. Prerequisite: MUS 228, Grade of C or better. Spring, annually.|
MUS 240
Intro To Music Technolog
Introduces the principles and applications of computers, synthesizers, and music synthesis to new music technologies. Achieves understanding through lectures, reading assignments, and hands-on experience with computers, synthesizers, and appropriate,computer software programs. Stresses applications of these new technologies to educational settings. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of MUS 160 or equivalent proficiency as verified by the instructor.|
MUS 243
Brass Class
Introduces playing and teaching brass instruments. Includes techniques of tone production, fingering, and class procedure learned through individual and ensemble playing. Students expected to develop an elementary proficiency on each instrument. Spri,ng, annually.|
MUS 244
String Class
Introduces playing and teaching the string instruments. Includes techniques of tone production, fingering, and class procedure learned through individual and ensemble playing. Students expected to develop an elementary proficiency on each instrument., Fall, annually.|
MUS 245
Percussion Class
Introduces playing and teaching standard percussion instruments. Includes the characteristics of various standard percussion instruments, performance techniques, development of performing ability necessary to develop an elementary proficiency on each, instrument. Fall, annually.|
MUS 246
Guitar Class
Introduces the guitar and bass guitar. Divided into three sections. First section introduces folk guitar techniques and styles, covering basic guitar chords, chordal progressions, melodic harmonization and chord chart reading. Second section introduc,es finger picking styles, such as classical, country, and jazz styles. Final section introduces the bass guitar. Students must provide their own acoustic six-string classic or folk guitar for class. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or permission of the instruct,or. Each semester.|
MUS 247
Woodwinds Class
Introduces playing and teaching techniques woodwind instruments. Includes techniques of tone production, fingering, and class procedure learned through individual and ensemble playing. Students expected to develop an elementary proficiency on each,instrument.|
MUS 253
History Of Jazz
Emphasizes the nature and process of jazz and particularly its historical background and development in the United States. Presents logical musical derivatives and developments and demonstrates the important elements that comprise individual jazz sty,les as they have evolved to the present time. Alternate years.|
MUS 254
Survey Of American Music
Provides a complete historical survey of American music from approximately 1620 to the 1980s. Includes musical trends and various styles and musical forms, i.e., religious music, folk music, popular music, and classical music of significant American,composers. Presents and analyzes styles and trends in their historical context. Utilizes tapes and live concerts. Prerequisite: MUS 111 or 112, or the permission of the instructor. Course offered in the spring term of each year, and also fall term as, faculty load permits.|
MUS 260
Vocal Pedagogy
Examines the physical nature and function of the vocal instrument and breathing process and how they relate to the fundamental principles of teaching vocal technique. Applies knowledge to the principles of vocal production and technique through lectu,res, demonstration, and discussion, as well as group participation in instructing each other. Prerequisite: Minimum of four semesters of voice or Voice Class I and II, or permission of instructor. Spring, biennially.|
MUS 274
Intro To Music Business
Introduces today's multi-faceted music industry. Includes music retailing, instrument sales, the music agent, artist management, contracts, concert promotion, licensing, publishing, copyright, songwriting, unions and guilds, music in production, adve,rtising and promotion, music in broadcasting and film, and career planning and development. Does not count toward humanities requirement. Prerequisite: sophomore standing.|
MUS 301
Survey of Western Music Histor
Explores the musical styles of western art music from the Middle Ages to the present. All influential and historically important genres, techniques, innovations, composers, and literatrue will be presented in relation to artistic, social, political,,and economic conditions of the periods. This course is not for Music Education majors.|
MUS 310
Junior Recital
Music majors elect this course if they are presenting a recital in their junior year of applied study. Elected concurrently with MUS 110. Prerequisite: Must be enrolled in upper-division applied study and successfully complete an audition. Each semes,ter.|
MUS 312
Found of Instrum Conducting
This is a competency-based course that is, specific techniques are introduced, practiced, and evaluated before moving to the next level of difficulty. It is designed to develop skilled baton technique and clarity of gesture and gocuses on traditional, and modern beat patterns, expressive gestures, cues, and development of the left hand. Other areas of study include effective rehearsal technique, understanding of performance problems involving tonal balance, tempo, complex rhythmic situations, esp,ecially related to intermediate and secondary school instrumental groups. Prerequisite: Music Education majors only.|
MUS 332
Chamber Singers
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUS 333
Elem Music Meth
Explores the role of music in elementary school; the roles of classroom teachers, the music specialists, and the consultant. Plans, attitudes, and problems in teaching vocal and instrumental music; curriculum development. Evaluation of musical experi,ence and growth in primary, intermediate, and upper elementary grades. Includes music reading as an integral part of the total music program, musical growth and experience in singing, part-singing, listening, instrumental and rhythmic activities. Emp,hasizes development of ability to use the voice effectively in teaching, and on the thorough familiarity with music series texts, use of keyboard, rhythmic instruments, recordings, and new developments in teaching aids. Introduces the Orff and Kodaly|
MUS 334
Jr High-Sec Mus Meth
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MUS 335
Music Comp for Non-Musicians
Explores the fundamental elements of music - rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, timbre, and form - the characteristics and parameters of each, their interactions, and how they are manipulated in creating music. Focus will be placed on analyzing exist,ing musical compositions and composing original musical works in a variety of mediums.|
MUS 345
Music From 1750-1900
Intensive study of the musical styles of the pre-classical, classical, and romantic periods of western music. Discusses important composers and their literature in relation to artistic, social, political, and economic conditions of their period. Emph,asizes analysis and listening. Prerequisite: MUS 127 or by permission. Fall, annually.|
MUS 346
Music From Antiqui-1750
Intensive study of the musical styles from the ages of classical Greece and Rome through the Baroque period, including the foundations of plainchant, early polyphony, sacred, and secular music of the 13th to mid-18th centuries. Discusses important co,mposers and their literature in relation to artistic, social, political, and economic conditions of their period. Emphasizes analysis and listening. Prerequisite: MUS 127 or by permission. Spring, annually.|
MUS 347
20th Century Music
Intensive study of the musical styles of the late Romantic Period (1890) through the 20th century. Discusses important composers and their literature in relation to artistic, social, political, and economic conditions of their period. Emphasizes anal,ysis and listening. Prerequisite: MUS 127, 345, or by permission. Fall, annually.|
MUS 349
Art Song Lit
Explores representative song repertoire of the German lied and the English language art song from historical and performance perspectives. Stresses the songs of Schubert, Schumann, Brahms, Wolf, Strauss, Britten, and Rorem. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 34,7, or permission of the instructor. On demand.|
MUS 350
Art Song Lit II
Explores representative song repertoire of French, Italian, Slavic, and Russian composers from historical and performance perspectives. Stresses the songs of Faure, Debussy, Ravel, Poulenc, and Moussorgsky. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission,of the instructor. On demand.|
MUS 351
Keyboard Lit
Surveys keyboard music from the Renaissance to the present. Representative works from each period are selected for careful study and analysis, emphasizing performance practices as well as formal and stylistic elements in the music. Includes the devel,opment of various keyboard instruments. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission of instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 352
Symphonic Lit
Intensive study of orchestral music from the Baroque period to the present, using scores, live performances, and recordings with particular reference to performance practices and stylistic analysis. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission of instr,uctor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 353
Chamber Music Lit
Intensive study of music written for small ensembles from the Renaissance period to the present. Representative works from each period are carefully investigated and analyzed. Performance by members of the class or by faculty groups whenever possible,. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission of instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 355
Operatic Lit
Surveys the entire field of operatic music from 1600 to the present, including 17th century Baroque opera; 18th century operatic reforms (Gluck and Mozart); opera in the 19th century (Verdi, Wagner, Strauss, and Puccini); 20th century trends in opera, (Stravinsky, Berg, Britten, Menotti, etc.) Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission of instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 356
Choral Literature
Surveys choral music from the 15th century to the present. Emphasizes masses, motets, and madrigals of the Renaissance period; oratorios, cantatas, and passions of the Baroque period; major choral works of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, Berlioz, Mendelsso,hn, Verdi, and Brahms; choral works of the 20th century. Prerequisites: MUS 345, 347, or permission of the instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 357
Band Literature
Surveys the available published and recorded literature for marching, military, and concert bands, symphonic and wind ensembles, and woodwind and brass chamber ensembles. Includes transcriptions and arrangements; major publishers in the field; evalua,tion of various editions; and also a study of the principal trends of instrumental pedagogy, repertoire, and performance. Prerequisite: MUS 131 . Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 359
Method of Tch Voca & Class Mus
Examines and analyzes principles and procedures of organizing and conducting vocal music ensembles and teaching classroom music grades K-12. Course content includes introduction of Orff, Dalcrose, and Kodaly methods, vocal technique, tone production,, diction, rehearsal techniques, the role of classroom teacher, lesson planning, student development, attitudes, and problems in teaching vocal and classroom music, curriculum development, professional ethics, and student assessment/evaluation. In-fie,ld supervised teaching experiences are arranged each semester. Restricted to music majors or minors only. Prerequisites: Admission to the Music Education program or permission of instructor. Fall, annually.|
MUS 360
Basic Conducting
Develops skilled baton technique and clarity of gesture. Focuses on traditional and modern beat patterns, expressive gestures, cues, and development of left hand. Prerequisite: Music majors or by permission of the instructor. Fall, annually.|
MUS 361
Piano Tch Meth
Surveys modern piano teaching methods and available published teaching materials. Emphasizes the teaching of notation and the development of reading skills; the teaching of keyboard techniques through an understanding of the player's physical mechani,sm and the coordination of timing and touch; problems of fingering, pedaling, and memorization. Evaluates materials for beginning students; easier teaching pieces by the great composers; anthologies; appropriate music for the intermediate student, le,ading to a more advanced technique and musicianship and to acquaintance with a wide range of composers and musical styles. Prerequisites: MUS 346 or 131 and permission of the instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 362
Instrumental Meth
Analyzes principles and procedures of organizing and conducting instrumental classes, bands, and orchestras in the public schools. Includes examination and use of texts, methods, and other materials. For music majors or by permission. Prerequisites:,MUS 127; MUSA 130/330 or 131/331; MUSA 135/335, 136/336, 137/337, 138/338, or 301; MUSA 136/336; and completion of Early Field Experience requirement. Spring, annually.|
MUS 363
Vocal Methods
Analyzes principles and procedures of organizing and conducting vocal classes and choral ensembles in the public schools. Includes vocal techniques, tone production, proper vowel placement, proper focus on tone, diction, diaphragmatic breathing, and,investigation of choral literature. For music majors or by permission. Prerequisites MUS 127; MUSA 130/330 or 131/331; MUSA 135/335, 136/336, 137/337, 138/338, or 301; MUSA 136/336; and completion of Early Field Experience requirement. Fall, annually,.|
MUS 364
Composition
Examines the nature of the musical idea and of the various possibilities of its subsequent development, including canonic or fugal treatment, motivic development, and variational procedures. Reviews traditional structural plans and of contemporary fo,rmal and stylistic trends. Creative assignments emphasize the understanding of past and present compositional styles and techniques and the gradual development of a personal language. Prerequisites: MUS 127 or permission of instructor. Offered when f,aculty is available.|
MUS 365
Instrumental Conducting
Further develops skilled baton techniques and clarity of gesture. Includes effective rehearsal technique, understanding of performance problems involving tonal balance, tempo, complex rhythmic situations, especially related to intermediate and second,ary school instrumental groups. Prerequisite: MUS 360. Spring, annually.|
MUS 366
Choral Conducting
Further develops skilled choral conducting techniques and clarity of gesture. Includes effective rehearsal technique, understanding of performance problems involving tonal balance, tempo, complex rhythmic situations, especially related to intermediat,e and secondary school choral groups. Prerequisite: MUS 360. Spring, annually.|
MUS 368
Band Arranging
Explores instrumentation and scoring problems in marching, military, and concert bands, symphonic wind ensembles, and woodwind and brass chamber ensembles. Emphasizes score layout and notation, copying and multiple reproduction of parts, copyright im,plications, and knowledge of effective combination of instrumental sounds. Prerequisites: MUS 131 (or equivalent background) and consent of instructor. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 369
Marching Band Tech
Examines the marching band, including organization, music materials, care of instruments and uniforms, marching essentials, administration, and contemporary techniques. Prerequisites: MUS 127 or permission of instructor. On demand.|
MUS 370
Orchestration/Arranging
A study of basic orchestration/arranging procedures and principles relative to instrumental and vocal ensembles. Emphasizes music for school use. Prerequisites: MUS 136, 162, 24245. Spring, annually.|
MUS 374
Inter Stu In Music Business
Explores special topics in the music industry, including the record industry; advanced issues in broadcasting and film; and career planning and development. Emphasizes individual projects in accordance with student interest. Prerequisite: MUS 274. Fa,ll, annually.|
MUS 375
West Mus Hist I: Antiquit-1825
This course is designated as the first course in the music history sequence required for music majors. This course explores the historically important genres, techniques, innovations, composers, and literature from the Romantic Period to the present., Further, this information will be related to the artistic, social, political, and economic conditions of each period. Prerequisites: MUS 127 or by permission of instructor.|
MUS 376
West Mus Hist II: 1825 to Pres
This course is designated as the second course in the music history sequence required for music majors. This course explores the historically important genres, techniques, innovations, composers, and literature from the Romantic Period to the present,. Further, this information will be related to the artistic, social, political, and economic conditions of each period. Prerequisites: MUS 127 or by permission of instructor.|
MUS 410
Senior Recital
The Music Department's Senior Recital series, which satisfies a department requirement. Music majors elect this course if they are preparing for a recital in their senior year of study. Elected concurrently with MUS 110. Prerequisite: Must be enrolle,d in upper-division applied music study. Each semester.|
MUS 411
Special Topics
Topics of special interest in the field of music will be offered. Previous subject areas have included Orff--music for children; Kodaly method; and Mozart, the man and his music. Topics will be announced in advance. Offered occasionally.|
MUS 451
Advanced Conducting
Analyzes selected works by band, choral, and orchestral literature with particular reference of performance problems involving tonal balance, tempi, complex rhythmic and polymetric situations, vocal intonations, and diction. Provides conducting exper,ience with band, choir, and/or madrigal singers, and orchestra in rehearsal. Emphasizes thorough understanding of the musical score and on effective rehearsal techniques. Prerequisites: MUS 365, 366, or permission of instructor. Offered when faculty,is available.|
MUS 452
Western Music
Examines Western music in its stylistic relationship to the fine arts from the Middle Ages through the 20th century. Explores how the various arts responded to each other in the pattern of cultural history. No prerequisite courses are required, but a, rudimentary background in music or art is desirable. Offered when faculty is available.|
MUS 453
Melodic Impro
Provides advanced music students with fundamental concepts of improvisational techniques that may be applied to the development of skills for the invention and performance of improvised melodies. Prerequisite: MUS 227, or equivalent music theory back,ground. Offered when faculty is available, alternate years.|
MUS 455
Jazz Comp And Arr
Explores basic techniques and methods of jazz composition and arranging. Participants write musical arrangements and original compositions for various jazz and popular idioms, and have the opportunity to conduct and perform their own works. Alternate, years.|
MUS 461
Adv Strg Tech And Ped
The sequence of courses listed below constitutes further study of the symphonic instruments. Specialized techniques, which are employed by each instrumental family, will be presented and mastered (strings, woodwinds, brasses, percussion.) Students,develop sufficient techniques to enable them to introduce and teach these instruments successfully at the elementary or secondary level. Includes methods, materials, manufacturers, suppliers, repair procedures, and procedures for private, homogeneou,s and heterogeneous group instruction, studio teaching and management, musicianship and creativity as part of the lesson, planning for various grade levels, history of teaching, and study of leading methods.|
MUS 462
Adv Woodwind Tch And Ped
The sequence of courses listed below constitutes further study of the symphonic instruments. Specialized techniques, which are employed by each instrumental family, will be presented and mastered (strings, woodwinds, brasses, percussion.) Students,develop sufficient techniques to enable them to introduce and teach these instruments successfully at the elementary or secondary level. Includes methods, materials, manufacturers, suppliers, repair procedures, and procedures for private, homogeneou,s and heterogeneous group instruction, studio teaching and management, musicianship and creativity as part of the lesson, planning for various grade levels, history of teaching, and study of leading methods.|
MUS 463
Adv Brass T And P
The sequence of courses listed below constitutes further study of the symphonic instruments. Specialized techniques, which are employed by each instrumental family, will be presented and mastered (strings, woodwinds, brasses, percussion.) Students,develop sufficient techniques to enable them to introduce and teach these instruments successfully at the elementary or secondary level. Includes methods, materials, manufacturers, suppliers, repair procedures, and procedures for private, homogeneou,s and heterogeneous group instruction, studio teaching and management, musicianship and creativity as part of the lesson, planning for various grade levels, history of teaching, and study of leading methods.|
MUS 464
Adv Perc T And P
The sequence of courses listed below constitutes further study of the symphonic instruments. Specialized techniques, which are employed by each instrumental family, will be presented and mastered (strings, woodwinds, brasses, percussion.) Students,develop sufficient techniques to enable them to introduce and teach these instruments successfully at the elementary or secondary level. Includes methods, materials, manufacturers, suppliers, repair procedures, and procedures for private, homogeneou,s and heterogeneous group instruction, studio teaching and management, musicianship and creativity as part of the lesson, planning for various grade levels, history of teaching, and study of leading methods.|
MUS 470
Form And Analysis
Analyzes musical styles from the pre-Baroque to the 20th Century, with emphasis on the common practice period. An overview of the operative generators of art music such as substructure (motives and phrases); normative structure (e.g. rondo, sonata, v,ariation forms); and aspects of melody, rhythm, counterpoint, and elements of sound. Prerequisites: MUS 236 or permission of instructor. Fall, annually.|
MUS 490
Independent Study
Provides opportunity to explore, in depth, an area of music of particular interest under the guidance of a faculty member. Requires a scholarly paper or special project(s) for credit and grade. Prerequisite: permission of the instructor and depart,ment chair.|
MUSA 110
Ap Mus: Violin I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 111
Ap Mus: Viola I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 112
Ap Mus: Cello I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 113
Ap Mus: Doub Bass I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 114
Ap Mus: Flute I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 115
Ap Mus: Oboe I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 116
Ap Mus: Clarinet I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 117
Ap Mus: Saxophone I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 118
Ap Mus: Bassoon I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 119
Ap Mus: Trumpet I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 120
Ap Mus: Fren Horn I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 121
Ap Mus: Euphonium I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 122
Ap Mus: Trombone I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 123
Ap Mus: Tuba I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 124
Ap Mus: Percussion I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 125
Ap Mus: Piano I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 126
Ap Mus: Voice I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 127
Ap Mus: Organ I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 128
Ap Mus: Guitar I
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 130
Concert Choir
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 131
Chamber Singers
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 132
Chamber Singers
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 133
Gospel Choir
Performing Organizations: courses MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under health and personal performance and under free electiv,es. Open to all students with permission of instructor.|
MUSA 134
Pep Band
Performing Organizations: courses MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under health and personal performance and under free electiv,es. Open to all students with permission of instructor.|
MUSA 135
Symphony Orchestra
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 136
Marching Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 137
Symphonic Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 138
Wind Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 139
Jazz Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 142
Woodwind Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 143
Brass Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 144
String Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 145
Percussion Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 149
Piano Accompanying/Ensemble
A practical course involving discussion of problems relating to the art of accompanying and supervised rehearsal and public performance of works for voice, instrument and piano ensemble. Skills to be developed include sight reading, score reading an,d rehearsal techniques. Students will meet with instructor for supervised rehearsal/discussion and will be assigned vocal and instrumental accompaniments as appropriate to their level. Prerequisite: MUSA 125|
MUSA 150
Ap Mus: Violin Perf I
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MUSA 151
Ap Mus: Viola Perf I
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MUSA 152
Ap Mus: Cello Perf I
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MUSA 153
Ap Mus:Dbl Bass Perf I
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MUSA 154
Ap Mus: Flute Perf I
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MUSA 155
Ap Mus: Oboe Perf I
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MUSA 156
Ap Mus: Clar Perf I
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MUSA 157
Ap Mus: Sax Perf I
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MUSA 158
Ap Mus: Bassoon Per I
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MUSA 159
Ap Mus: Trump Perf I
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MUSA 160
Ap Mus: Fr Hrn Perf I
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MUSA 161
Ap Mus: Euphon Perf I
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MUSA 162
Ap Mus: Tromb Perf I
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MUSA 163
Ap Mus: Tuba Perf I
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MUSA 164
Ap Mus: Percus Perf I
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MUSA 165
Ap Mus: Piano Perf I
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MUSA 166
Ap Mus: Voice Perf I
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MUSA 167
Ap Mus: Organ Perf I
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MUSA 210
Ap Mus: Violin II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 211
Ap Mus: Viola II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 212
Ap Mus: Cello II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 213
Ap Mus: Doub Bass II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 214
Ap Mus: Flute II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 215
Ap Mus: Oboe II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 216
Ap Mus: Clarinet II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 217
Ap Mus: Saxophone II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 218
Ap Mus: Bassoon II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 219
Ap Mus: Trumpet II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 220
Ap Mus: Fren Horn II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 221
Ap Mus: Euphonium II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 222
Ap Mus: Trombone II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 223
Ap Mus: Tuba II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 224
Ap Mus: Percussion II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 225
Ap Mus: Piano II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 226
Ap Mus: Voice II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 227
Ap Mus: Organ II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 228
Ap Mus: Guitar II
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 250
Ap Mus: Violin Perf II
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MUSA 251
Ap Mus: Viola Perf II
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MUSA 252
Ap Mus: Cello Perf II
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MUSA 253
Ap Mus:Dbl Bass Per II
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MUSA 254
Ap Mus: Flute Perf II
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MUSA 255
Ap Mus: Oboe Perf II
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MUSA 256
Ap Mus: Clar Perf II
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MUSA 257
Ap Mus: Sax Perf II
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MUSA 258
Ap Mus: Bassoon Per II
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MUSA 259
Ap Mus: Trump Perf II
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MUSA 260
Ap Mus: Fr Hrn Perf II
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MUSA 261
Ap Mus: Euphon Perf II
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MUSA 262
Ap Mus: Tromb Perf II
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MUSA 263
Ap Mus: Tuba Perf II
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MUSA 264
Ap Mus: Percus Perf II
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MUSA 265
Ap Mus: Piano Perf II
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MUSA 266
Ap Mus: Voice Perf II
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MUSA 267
Ap Mus: Organ Perf II
|
MUSA 301
Instrumental Ensemble Pract
Provides ensemble performance experience for music majors on secondary instruments. Also provides student conductors the opportunity to develop rehearsal technique through experiences directing an ensemble. Prerequisites: At least two of the followi,ng: MUS 241, 242, 243, or 245; and MUS 365. Each semester.|
MUSA 302
Choral Ensemble Practicum
Course is designed to provide ensemble performance experience for music majors on secondary instruments. Also provides student conductors the opportunity to develop rehearsal technique through experiences directing an ensemble. Prerequsite: MUS 182,; MUS 366 to conduct|
MUSA 310
Ap Mus: Violin III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 311
Ap Mus: Viola III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 312
Ap Mus: Cello III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 313
Ap Mus: Doub Bass III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 314
Ap Mus: Flute III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 315
Ap Mus: Oboe III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 316
Ap Mus: Clarinet III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 317
Ap Mus: Saxophone III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 318
Ap Mus: Bassoon III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 319
Ap Mus: Trumpet III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 320
Ap Mus: Fren Horn III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 321
Ap Mus: Euphonium III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 322
Ap Mus: Trombone III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 323
Ap Mus: Tuba III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 324
Ap Mus: Percussion III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 325
Ap Mus: Piano III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 326
Ap Mus: Voice III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 327
Ap Mus: Organ III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 328
Ap Mus: Guitar III
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 330
Concert Choir
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 331
Chamber Singers
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 332
Show Choir
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 333
Gospel Choir
Performing Organizations: courses MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under health and personal performance and under free electiv,es. Open to all students with permission of instructor.|
MUSA 334
Pep Band
Performing Organizations: courses MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under health and personal performance and under free electiv,es. Open to all students with permission of instructor.|
MUSA 335
Symphony Orchestra
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 336
Marching Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 337
Symphonic Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 338
Wind Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 339
Jazz Band
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 342
Woodwind Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 343
Brass Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 344
String Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 345
Percussion Ensemble
MUSA 130-145 may be taken for one credit or for no credit. Credits earned may not be counted among the humanities in general education but may be counted under personal development and life skills and under free electives. Open to all students with, permission of instructor. 300-level reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 349
Piano Accompanying/Ensemble
A practical course involving discussion of problems relating to the art of accompanying and supervised rehearsal and public performance of works for voice, instrument and piano ensemble. Skills to be developed include sight reading, score reading an,d rehearsal techniques. Students will meet with instructor for supervised rehearsal/discussion and will be assigned vocal and instrumental accompaniments to their level. Prerequisite: MUSA 125|
MUSA 350
Ap Mus: Violin Per III
|
MUSA 351
Ap Mus: Viola Perf III
|
MUSA 352
Ap Mus: Cello Per III
|
MUSA 353
Ap Mus:Dbl Bass Pf III
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MUSA 354
Ap Mus: Flute Per III
|
MUSA 355
Ap Mus: Oboe Perf III
|
MUSA 356
Ap Mus: Clar Perf III
|
MUSA 357
Ap Mus: Sax Perf III
|
MUSA 358
Ap Mus:Bassoon Per III
|
MUSA 359
Ap Mus: Trump Per III
|
MUSA 360
Ap Mus: Fr Hrn Per III
|
MUSA 361
Ap Mus: Euphon Per III
|
MUSA 362
Ap Mus: Tromb Perf III
|
MUSA 363
Ap Mus: Tuba Perf III
|
MUSA 364
Ap Mus: Percus Per III
|
MUSA 365
Ap Mus: Piano Perf III
|
MUSA 366
Ap Mus: Voice Perf III
|
MUSA 367
Ap Mus: Organ Perf III
|
MUSA 410
Ap Mus: Violin IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 411
Ap Mus: Viola IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 412
Ap Mus: Cello IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 413
Ap Mus: Doub Bass IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 414
Ap Mus: Flute IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 415
Ap Mus: Oboe IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 416
Ap Mus: Clarinet IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 417
Ap Mus: Saxophone IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 418
Ap Mus: Bassoon IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 419
Ap Mus: Trumpet IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 420
Ap Mus: Fren Horn IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 421
Ap Mus: Euphonium IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 422
Ap Mus: Trombone IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 423
Ap Mus: Tuba IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 424
Ap Mus: Percussion IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 425
Ap Mus: Piano IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 426
Ap Mus: Voice IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 427
Ap Mus: Organ IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 428
Applied Music:Guitar IV
Individual instruction in strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, piano, voice, organ and guitar. Stresses development of an attitude of artistic maturity on the part of the student and upon artistic performance at all levels of proficiency. All mat,riculated music majors must elect applied music credits on their major instrument/voice Each semester in residence. Admission by audition and permission of instructor and department chair. Admission of non-majors is dependent upon availability of t,he staff. For more information, see Music Department chair. Prerequisite: MUS 131 or equivalent background. 200-, 300-, and 400-levels reserved for music majors only.|
MUSA 450
Ap Mus: Violin Perf IV
|
MUSA 451
Ap Mus: Viola Perf IV
|
MUSA 452
Appl Mus: Cello Per IV
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MUSA 453
Ap Mus:Dbl Bass Per IV
|
MUSA 454
Ap Mus: Flute Perf IV
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MUSA 455
Ap Mus: Oboe Perf IV
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MUSA 456
Ap Mus: Clar Perf IV
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MUSA 457
Ap Mus: Sax Perf IV
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MUSA 458
Ap Mus: Bassoon Per IV
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MUSA 459
Ap Mus: Trump Perf IV
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MUSA 460
Ap Mus: Fr Hrn Perf IV
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MUSA 461
Ap Mus: Euphon Perf IV
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MUSA 462
Ap Mus: Tromb Perf IV
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MUSA 463
Ap Mus: Tuba Perf IV
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MUSA 464
Ap Mus: Percus Perf IV
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MUSA 465
Ap Mus: Piano Perf IV
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MUSA 466
Ap Mus: Voice Perf IV
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MUSA 467
Ap Mus Organ Perf IV
|
NSCI 150
Integrated Science I
The first of a two semester sequence of basic science for elementary education majors. Integrates elements of earth science, physical science, biology, and chemistry as recommended in state and national accreditations. Emphasis is placed on the app,lication of the information into the elementary school classroom.|
NSCI 151
Integrated Science II
The second of a two semester sequence of basic science for elementary education majors. Integrates elements of earth science, physical science, biology, and chemistry as recommended in state and national accreditations. Emphasis is placed on the ap,plication of the information into the elementary school classroom.|
NUCM 301
Nuclear Medicine I
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree, the concentration in nuclear medicine has been proposed so 30 - 60 clinical credits may be transferred into Clarion from formal nuclear medicine educational programs that are accredited by the Joint, Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). The curriculum of every JRCNMT-accredited nuclear medicine program must meet the same standards and guidelines although clinical course titles and credits vary slight,ly with each program. Placeholder courses (NUCM 301, 302, 401, and 402) will facilitate transference of clinical credits from accredited nuclear medicine programs into Clarion. Prerequisite: Placement into Math 112.|
NUCM 302
Nuclear Medicine II
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree, the concentration in nuclear medicine has been proposed so 30 - 60 clinical credits may be transferred into Clarion from formal nuclear medicine educational programs that are accredited by the Joint, Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). The curriculum of every JRCNMT-accredited nuclear medicine program must meet the same standards and guidelines although clinical course titles and credits vary slight,ly with each program. Placeholder courses (NUCM 301, 302, 401, and 402) will facilitate transference of clinical credits from accredited nuclear medicine programs into Clarion. Prerequisite: Placement into Math 112.|
NUCM 303
Nuclear Medicine Clinical III
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree and concentration in nuclear medicine, placeholder courses facilitate the transference of block credits for completion of a formal nuclear medicine educational program in nuclear medicine that is rec,ognized by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT).|
NUCM 401
Nuclear Medicine III
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree, the concentration in nuclear medicine has been proposed so 30 - 60 clinical credits may be transferred into Clarion from formal nuclear medicine educational programs that are accredited by the Joint, Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). The curriculum of every JRCNMT-accredited nuclear medicine program must meet the same standards and guidelines although clinical course titles and credits vary slight,ly with each program. Placeholder courses (NUCM 301, 302, 401, and 402) will facilitate transference of clinical credits from accredited nuclear medicine programs into Clarion. Prerequisite: Placement into Math 112.|
NUCM 402
Nuclear Medicine IV
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree, the concentration in nuclear medicine has been proposed so 30 - 60 clinical credits may be transferred into Clarion from formal nuclear medicine educational programs that are accredited by the Joint, Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT). The curriculum of every JRCNMT-accredited nuclear medicine program must meet the same standards and guidelines although clinical course titles and credits vary slight,ly with each program. Placeholder courses (NUCM 301, 302, 401, and 402) will facilitate transference of clinical credits from accredited nuclear medicine programs into Clarion. Prerequisite: Placement into Math 112.|
NUCM 403
Nuclear Medicine Clinical VI
Within the B.S. in Medical Imaging Sciences degree and concentration in nuclear medicine, placeholder courses facilitate the transference of block credits for completion of a formal nuclear medicine educational program in nuclear medicine that is rec,ognized by the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs in Nuclear Medicine Technology (JRCNMT).|
NURS 100
Intro to Professional Nursing
Students who participate in this course will develop a beginning understanding of the role of the professional nurse. The history of nursing and fundamental nursing principles will be examined. The role of nursing within the healthcare delivery sys,tem will be explored. An overview of the nursing process will be provided and students will have the opportunity to practice some basic psychomotor skills that are required in nursing.|
NURS 101
Nurs Proc I: Fund Pract
Introduces students to the concepts of individual, health, and environment. Emphasizes the nursing process as the basis for client-centered care. Provides the theoretical foundation for the development of cognitive, psychomotor, and communication ski,lls necessary to care for clients and promote healthy responses. Examines the needs of culturally diverse individuals within the context of their functional health patterns. Three lecture hours per week. Prerequisites or co-requisites: BIOL 258 and P,SY 211. Co-requisites: NURS 111, 121, and 131. Fall, annually.|
NURS 102
Nursing Process II
Focuses on the application of the nursing process in acute care settings to individuals across the life span. Explores the nursing process as it relates to the care of clients in crisis from rape/sexual assault/domestic violence and clients with inef,fective response to crisis (chemical dependency/suicide). Considers the nursing care of clients with musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and gynecologic dysfunction. The last portion of the class focuses on human reproduction in health and illness. Fo,ur class hours weekly. Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C in BIOL 251/261 and a minimum grade of B in NURS 101, 121, 131 and Pass in NURS 111. Co-requisites: NURS 112, 133. BIOL 252/262 and PSY 260 may be taken as a prerequisite or co-requisi|
NURS 111
Nurs Proc I:Fnd Nurs Clin Prac
Clinical practice experience provides opportunities for the student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 101 and 131. Students care for elderly and/or chronically ill clients who require basic nursing interventions in long-term care setting,s. Six clinical hours weekly. Co-requisites: NURS 101 and 121. Fall, annually.|
NURS 112
Nurs Proc II:Clinical Practice
Clinical practice experience provides opportunities for the student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 102 and NURS 133. Students care for clients in crisis and clients across the life span having musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal, and gy,necologic dysfunction. Provides clinical experience in the obstetrical setting with mothers and newborns. Offers increased opportunities for medication administration. Twelve clinical hours weekly. Co-requisites: NURS 102 and NURS133. Prerequisites:,A minimum grade of C in BIOL 251/261 and a minimum grade of B in NURS 101, 121,131 and a Pass in NURS 111. Spring, annually.|
NURS 121
Nurs Proc I: Pract Lab
Provides students with the opportunity to learn basic nursing skills required to deliver nursing interventions to clients experiencing alterations in their health status. Enables nursing students to acquire beginning skills and confidence through pra,ctice in the college learning laboratory. Three laboratory hours weekly. Pass/ Fail. Co-requisites: NURS 101 and 111. Prerequisite or co-requisite: NURS 131. Fall, annually.|
NURS 131
Nursing Health Assessmt
Teaches students beginning skills in assessing the health of clients through health histories and physical examinations. Provides students with opportunities to practice assessment skills. Required of all ASN students. Open to any student with permis,sion of the instructor. Fall, annually.|
NURS 132
Pharmac Aspects Of Nurs
Presents principles of pharmacology with practical application to the care of clients. Emphasizes major drug classifications, actions/interactions, side effects, and related nursing interventions. Introduces learning strategies to develop student abi,lities in making critical assessments and decisions about pharmacological interventions. Required of all ASN students. Open to any student with permission of the instructor. Spring, annually.|
NURS 133
Pharm Aspects of Nursi: Part I
Provides the foundation for the pharmacological aspects of nursing. Emphasizes the nursing processs and drug therapy; pharmacologic principles; lifespan considerations; legal, ethical, and cultural considerations; and patient education and drug thera,py. Correlates with content delivered in NURS 102 Nursing Process II. Focuses on the pharmacological management of the client with Musculoskeletal, Pain, Gatrointestinal, Nutritional, Substance Abuse, Women's Health Disorders. Emphasizes major drug c,lassifications, actions and drug effects, indications, adverse effets and toxicity, nursing interventions and patient teaching in these areas. Required of all ASN students.|
NURS 201
Nursing Process III
Focuses on the application of the nursing process to individuals across the life span in acute care and community settings. Utilizes the nursing process in determining the care of clients having cancer, and the care of clients with respiratory, cardi,ovascular, sensory, and urinary and renal dysfunctions. Four class hours weekly. Co-requisite: NURS 211. Prerequisites: PSY 260, minimum grade of C in BIOL 259 and NURS 102 and 132, and Pass in NURS 112. Fall, annually.|
NURS 202
Nursing Process IV
Focuses on the application of the nursing process in a variety of settings to individuals across the life span. Explores the nursing process as it relates to the care of clients having immune, neurologic, endocrine and psychiatric-mental health dysfu,nction. Emphasizes the nursing management of selected clients requiring critical care. Co-requisite: NURS 212. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in NURS 201 and Pass in NURS 211. Spring, annually.|
NURS 203
Nursing Seminar
Introduces students to relevant issues and current and future trends in nursing healthcare. Provides opportunities for students to explore ethical issues that nurses often encounter. Emphasizes role transition from student to graduate nurse. Prere,quisites: Minimum grade of B in NURS 101, 102, and 201. Spring, annually.|
NURS 211
Nurs Proc III: Clin Practice
Clinical practice experience provides opportunities for students to implement objectives identified in NURS 201. Students care for clients across the life span having cancer and clients having respiratory, cardiovascular, sensory, urinary, and renal,dysfunctions. Provides opportunities for administration of intravenous medications and development of skills in comprehensive client assessment. Twelve clinical hours weekly. Co-requisite: NURS 201. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in BIOL 259 and N,URS 102 and 132 and Pass in NURS 112. Fall, annually.|
NURS 212
Nurs Proc IV:Clinical Practice
Clinical practice experience provides opportunities for students to implement objectives identified in NURS 202 and 203. Students care for acutely ill clients across the life span having immune, neurologic, endocrine, and psychiatric-mental health dy,sfunctions. Provides opportunities for delivery of care to increasing numbers of clients, and guided practice in refining interpersonal and decision-making skills required of the graduate nurse. Twelve clinical hours weekly. Co-requisites: NURS 202 a,nd 203. Prerequisites: Minimum grade of C in NURS 201, and Pass in NURS 211. Spring, annually.|
NURS 233
Pharm Aspects of Nurs: Part II
Builds on the foundations of the pharmacological aspects of nursing in NURS 133 (part I) and correlates with content delivered in NURS 201 Nursing Process III. Focuses on the pharmacological management of the client with Cancer, Cardiovascular, Anemi,a, Respiratory, Infection, Sensory, and Urinary/Renal disorders. Emphasizes major drug classifications, actions and drug effects, indications, adverse effects, indications, adverse effects and toxicity, nursing interventions and patient teaching in t,hese areas. Required of all ASN students.|
NURS 234
Pharm Aspect of Nurs: Part III
Builds on the foundations of the pharmacological aspects of nursing in NURS 133 (part I) and NURS 233 (part II) and correlates with content delivered in NURS 202 Nursing Process IV. Focuses on the pharmacological management of the client with Immune,, Endocrine, Neurologic, psychiatric-mental disorders. Emphasizes major drug classifications, actions and drug effects, indications, adverse effects and toxicity, nursing interventions and patient teaching in these areas. Required of all ASN studen,ts. Pre-requisite NURS 133 and NURS 233.|
NURS 241
Clin Reasoning & Prob Solving
Students who participate in this course will develop clinical reasoning and problem solving skills necessary for effective decision making by professional nurses. Factors that influence clinical reasoning and problem solving will be examined to faci,litate higher level thinking in clinical situations. This course will be open to all second year ASN students. Other nursing students may be admitted with permission of instructor.|
NURS 242
Service Learning in Nursing
This seminar course provides an opportunity for nursing students to participate in community based learning. The focus is on participating in experiences in the community that reinforce skills and concepts addressed in Nursing Process Courses. The,emphasis is on nursing assessment of community needs, patient teaching within the community, and professional commitment to the health of the community. This course helps the student develop community assessment, problem-solving, and reflective skil,ls, while encouraging engagement. This course will be open to all ASN nursing students. Each semester as needed. Prerequisite: Must have completed or be enrolled in NURS 101.|
NURS 299
Special Topics In Nurs
This course deals with topics of special interest for all nursing students. It will focus on identified nursing subjects needed to keep students abreast of the changing trends in the profession and provide them with a mechanism for updating their nu,rsing knowledge and clinical competencies. This course may be offered summers and weekends during the academic year according to demand, and will be open to all students.|
NURS 320
Death And Grief
Explores the dying process from various conceptual and theoretical frameworks. Focuses on historical, ethical, socio-cultural and interpersonal perspectives on death. Students address their own mortality and develop a personal philosophy of death and, grief. Opportunities are provided for students to interact with professional experts as well as individuals experiencing grief/death issues. Annually, and as needed. Open to all students.|
NURS 335
Alternative Therapies
Explores various approaches to health and healing that lie outside the realm of conventional Western medicine. Focuses on how these therapies are presented on the World Wide Web and how the registered nurse can evaluate their effectiveness. Student,s will research selected topics and critically appraise the quality of information found on the internet.|
NURS 340
Nursing In Transition
This course provides a theoretical foundation for the transition from technical to professional nursing practice. Students will address the concepts of nursing, health, individual, and environment and explore nursing as an evolving profession with em,phasis on the historical perspectives, environmental context, and future trends that could impact health care. This course views individuals from a holistic perspective, and explores the spectrum of health and wellness. Clinical thinking, theory, ev,idence-based practice, and nursing research are introduced as the basis for professional nursing practice. Writing skills for the professional nurse are developed in the course. (Open to students who are licensed RNs. Fall and spring as needed.)|
NURS 341
Culture & Care in Nursing Prac
This course will promote an understanding of holistic nursing practice in a multicultural society. Nursing theories related to culture and caring will be used as frameworks to explore the influence of cultural values, beliefs, and practices on healt,h. Specific ethnic groups will be examined in terms of lifestyles, healthcare decisions, and cultural care modalities. Topics related to social justice and nurses as global citizens will be explored.|
NURS 342
Clinical Thinking in Nursing
This course focuses on clinical thinking as a nursing skill and its practical application in the health care arena. Emphasizes is placed on defining critical thinking as well as exploring critical thinking, creative thinking, reasoning, decision maki,ng, problem solving, and metacognition as they relate to the many facets of professional nursing practice. Provides students opportunities to transfer skills to problems of a professional and personal nature. Open to students who are licensed RNs and, others with permission of instructor. Spring annually, or as needed|
NURS 343
Health Literacy in Nurs Pract
This course examines concepts related to health literacy in professional nursing practice. Topics include the teaching/learning process in health education at the individual, family, and community levels. Content will explore locating and evaluatin,g pertinent information technology to imporve safety in healthcare. Focus will be placed on interpersonal and professional communication skills necessary within a multidisciplinary term. (Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the inst,ructor).|
NURS 345
Trends & Issues in Pro Nursing
This course expolores current issues and trends influencing professional nursing practice. Areas of discussion include the political arena of health care, innovative nursing practices, societal demands on nursing, evaluation of professional organiza,tions, and the legal and ethical issues of professional nursing. The course provides students with an opportunity to study factors impacting the health of individuals, families, an communities internationally. Open to licensed RN's and others with,permission of the instructor.|
NURS 346
Health Assessment
Enables the registered nurse to enhance skills in assessing the health status of individuals. Provides an opportunity to obtain a comprehensive health history and perform a screening physical assessment. Emphasizes recognizing deviations from normal,and integrating physiological, psychosocial, developmental, spiritual, and transcultural dimensions in order to formulate diagnostic hypothesis. Open to students who are licensed RNs. Spring, annually and as needed.|
NURS 347
Creating A Wellness Lfst
Introduces the student to the concepts of wellness and health promotion from a holistic perspective. Within this framework, students explore how to gain more control over their lives through effective stress management, management of time and change,, and adequate self and social support. Assists students in increasing self-responsibility and negotiating the health care delivery system. Discusses health measures such as diet, exercise, and sleep as they relate to a wellness lifestyle. Explores th,e balance of caring for others and caring for self. Each student is guided in formulating an individualized wellness plan. Open to all students. Annually, and as needed.|
NURS 355
Health Promotion in Nursing
The focus of this course is health promotion of individuals and families from an epidemiological perspective. Nursing theory is used as an organizing framework for the course. Course content addresses theories related to health promotion, lifestyle, and risk assessment, and motivation as it relates to behavioral change. Therapeutic interventions for health promotion across lifespan, nursing roles in health promotion, and future health care trends which impact health promotion, will be explored,. (Opened to licensed RN's). Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C in NURS 340. Co-requisite: NURS 342.|
NURS 361
Nurse As Educator
Requires students to develop and provide health education to individuals, families, and communities. Focuses on the nursing process, the teaching/learning process, and health care informatics. Provides opportunities for the student to implement the t,eaching/learning process in the delivery of health education programs. Open to students who are licensed RNs. Fall, annually and as needed.|
NURS 365
Health Prom For Elderly
Provides students with information and strategies related to the promotion and maintenance of health in a holistic manner for the elderly population. Promotes inquiry and stimulates the critical-thinking processes of the student by emphasizing health, and wellness concepts. Open to all students. Annually as needed.|
NURS 368
Human Caring
Provides an opportunity for in-depth exploration of the concept caring. Appropriate to students entering any human service major. Derives content primarily from scholarly works in the discipline of nursing. Supplements Jean Watson's theory of human c,aring with guided experiences designed to facilitate personal discovery of one's caring capacities and opportunities to more fully integrate them into the work of one's discipline. Open to all students. Annually as needed.|
NURS 376
Frontiers In Health Care
Provides an opportunity for students to explore the U.S. health care system, its complexities, problems, alternatives for managing problems, and its impact on individuals and populations. Social, technological, political, and economic contexts provid,e a framework to explore the collaborative efforts of professionals to transform health care delivery both nationally and internationally. Students address current, complex national and international health issues. Open to all RN students and others,with permission of instructor. Fall annually and as needed.|
NURS 380
Appl Stats For Hlth Care Prof
Introduces students in health care professions to the knowledge and understanding of statistics as applied to health care practice and research. Introduces the basic rules and principles of statistics through investigation of quantitative and qualit,ative problems in health care. Prerequisite: C or better in MATH 050 or satisfactory score in the Mathematics department placement examination. Spring semester.|
NURS 400
Violence Prevention in Nursing
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. NURS 400 porvides an opportunity for students to explore violence as a major health problem in the United States while investigatin,g the impact on individuals, communities, and our health care system. Students will explore the role of the nurse as both a victim of workplace violence and as the healthcare provider treating victims of violence. Students will develop nursing care p,rojects that include the identification of victims, risk-assessments of potential victims, effective health care interventions, and preventive strategies. Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the instructor. Fall annually and as needed|
NURS 410
Intro to Forensic Nursing
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. NURS 410 provides students with an overview of forensic nursing science as a specialty area of practice. Forensic nursing standards, of practice and performance are the foundation of the course. In addition, students explore evidence collection in the clinical role of the nurse, legal and ethical aspects of forensic nursing, victim advocacy, and career opportunities. Knowledge an,d skills of forensic health care are integrated into current nursing practice to provide comprehensive, culturally appropriate care to individuals, families, and communities. Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the instructor. Fall an|
NURS 420
Forensic Nursing & Justice Sys
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. The purpose of this course is to fully introduce the nursing student to the role and responsibilities of the criminal justice profe,ssionals he/she will work with during all aspects of a criminal investigation both in and out of the formal hospital environment. Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite of Corequisite in NURS 410. Fall annua,lly and as needed.|
NURS 430
App Prin & Tech of Inter & Inv
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. NURS 430 provides a detailed look into the specific investigative principles and techniques used by forensic nurses during their ex,perience with an actual victim of a crime. The aim of this class is to fully introduce and discuss the various stages of the criminal investigative process specific to the forensic nurse. Content will focus upon the specific techniques, skills, and p,rocedures used to carry out a forensic assessment, including physical evidence collection and documentation, interviewing of victims, and testifying in criminal court. Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the instructor. Prerequisite o|
NURS 440
Emerg & Disaster Prep for Nurs
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. NURS 440 introduces the student to the nurse's role in emergency and disaster planning and management, including mass casualty even,ts. Nursing care of populations including psychological and behavioral manifestations of disaster victims and responders in natural and man-made disasters are highlighted. Ethical consideratins of vulnerable populations and standards of nursing pract,ice during disasters will be explored. Open to licensed RN's and others with permission of the instructor. Spring annually and as needed.|
NURS 445
Research in Nursing
This course emphasizes the role of research in developing evidence-based nursing practice. Students will explore the principles of systematic method of inquiry and the application of clinical thinking, group process, and decision-making skills. The, course focuses on the ways research influences decisions in nursing and nursing care. As consumers of research, students will have an opportunity to critique current research for applicability to professional nursing practice. As novice producers o,f research, students will work in groups to develop a research proposal of value to nursing. (Open to licensed RN's) Prerequisites: A minimum grade of C in NURS 340, 341, 342, 343, 355 and MATH 221. Co-requisite: 470. Fall, and as needed.|
NURS 450
Field Exp In Health Agen
In consultation with the faculty, opportunities are provided for the student, as a client advocate, to apply selected concepts to the health promotion of clients in a variety of settings. Prerequisites: Junior standing, NURS 365, or permission of t,he instructor. As needed.|
NURS 457
Leadership In Nursing
Provides a theoretical foundation for the practice of independent and interdependent nursing. Introduces the principles of leadership and management, and emphasizes their application to professional nursing. Focus includes concepts of motivation, cha,nge, group process, empowerment, and nursing care delivery systems. Open to licensed RN students and others with permission of instructor. Spring annually, and as needed.|
NURS 460
Forensic Nurs Sem & Practicum
This online course was developed as one of six online courses for the post baccalaureate Forensic Nursing Certificate. NURS 460 provides students with an opportunity to appraise current trends, issues, and research findings related to forensic nursin,g practice. Through the completion of the practicum experience, students apply forensic nursing knowledge and skills in a specialty area with a selected population of interest. Prerequisites: NURS 400, 410, 420, 430, and 440.|
NURS 463
Acute Care
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NURS 470
Promoting Healthy Communities
Introduces essential knowledge and important nursing roles for health promotion and illness prevention at the family and community level. Students will explore principles of epidemiology, demography, and relevant nursing and health-related theories,and models as they apply to the health of individuals, families, and aggregates. Pre-requisites: NURS 340, 342, and 361. Pre or co-requisite NURS 346. Fall annually, and as needed.|
NURS 480
Role Seminar In Prof Nursing
This capstone course provides a culminating experience in the exploration of the professional nursing roles. Emphasizes present and evolving nursing contributions in a reformed health care system. Students are guided in the development of a self-di,rected exploration of a selected role. Must be taken as a co-requisite to NURS 481. Open to RN students only. Prerequisites: Earned grade of C in NURS 340, 342, 346, 361, 380, 445, 470. Spring annually.|
NURS 482
Role Exploration In Prof
This capstone course provides opportunities for students to explore a professional nursing role through research, interviews and other scholarly activities. The role under investigation can be one of possible graduate study or career advancement. The, student may select from a variety of roles such as CRNP, CRNA, clinical specialist, nurse educator, administrator, researcher, etc. Must be taken as a co-requisite with NURS 480. Prerequisites: minimum grade of C in NURS 340, 342, 346, 357, 361, 376,, 380, 445 and 470. Spring annually|
NURS 494
Advanced Con of Pro Nursing
This is the capstone course for the RN-BSN program. The student will engage in a capstone project that reflects application, synthesis, and evaluation of concepts and nursing issues studied throughout the program. Application of educational experie,nce to professional growth and contribution to the nursing profession is emphasized. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of C in NURS 340, 341, 342, 355, 445, and 470.|
NURS 499
Special Topics In Nurs
Deals with topics of special interest to professional nurses. Focuses on identified nursing subjects pertinent to the practice of professional nursing. May be offered during the academic year as well as summers and weekends, according to demand.|
NURS 601
Adv Concepts In Pathophy
This course is devoted to the study of the physiological process of disease and the body's response to this process. It is the goal of the course to present broad physiological principles that advance nurse practitioners can apply to their clinical e,xperiences. Specific diseases will be used to exemplify pathophysiological concepts, and treatment is examined at the molecular level as response to the pathophysiology. The course investigates exogenous causes of diseases emphasizing infection, infl,ammation, and the immune response as well as endogenous diseases of the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, hepatic, pulmonary, and renal systems. Fall, annually|
NURS 602
Pharmacologic Applic
This course will cover principles of pharmacology as applied to advanced nursing practice. This includes drug effectiveness, mechanism, and interaction. Emphasis will be on the pharmacological action of drugs on specific organ systems and the clinica,l use of drugs in treatment of disease conditions. Emphasis will be on critical decision making skills in the selection of drug therapy, doses of drugs, routes of administration and preferred therapy. This course focuses on pharmacological implicatio,ns for the family nurse practitioner in working with individuals across the life span. Prerequisite: NURS 601. Spring, annually and as needed.|
NURS 605
Evolution Of Nurs Theory
This course focuses on selected aspects of theory development in nursing science. Emphasis is given to the study of epistemological issues related to the evolution of theory in nursing. Varying levels and components of theories are explored. Major st,rategies for theory development, including concept analysis, synthesis, and theory derivation are analyzed. Students gain experience in critically examining major existing theoretical models. Fall, annually.|
NURS 610
Adv Concepts Nurs Resear
This course examines the relationship and contribution of nursing research to the development of nursing science. The growth of research will be traced over the course of the last century, with particular emphasis on the evolution that has occurred s,ince mid-century. Students will be assisted to increase their ability to critically evaluate published research and to make decisions concerning its applicability to practice. Additionally, students will develop a proposal for an individual or group,research project which may become the foundational work for the scholarly project/thesis. Prerequisite: NURS 605 or by permission of instructor. Spring, annually and as needed.|
NURS 614
Health Promo: Fam & Comm Pers
This course introduces the advanced practice nurse student to health promotion and disease prevention strategies for families and communities. Students will explore principles of family theory, established models of family development, epidemiology,,and demography. An opportunity will be given to develop intervention plans to improve wellness based on risk assessment and knowledge of national standards of clinical preventive services. Fall, annually.|
NURS 615
Adv Health Assessment
This course builds upon the basic assessment skills of the nurse. It prepares the advanced practice nurse to conduct focused and comprehensive health assessments of clients across the lifespan. The process of diagnostic reasoning is emphasized as t,he primary means of collecting and analyzing data obtained from the client history, physical examination, and diagnostic procedures. Two hours lecture weekly. Must be taken concurrently with NURS 616. Prerequisite or Co-requisites: NURS 601. Offe,red fall annually and as needed.|
NURS 616
Adv Health Assessment Pract
Provides opportunity for the student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 615. Students may select experiences from a variety of clinical settings appropriate to the course focus. Three clinical hours weekly. This course must be taken as a,co-requisite to NURS 615. Prerequisite or co-requisite: NURS 601. Fall, annually and as needed.|
NURS 617
Adv Hlth As Prac for Nurs Edu
Provides an opportunity for the nurse educator student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 615. Emphasis is on acquisition of physical assessment skills across the lifespan within te context of the role of nurse educator. Students may se,lect experiences from a variety of clinical settings appropriate to the coursefocus. Three clinical hours weekly. Prerequisites: NURS 601 (or taken concurrently); must be taken with NURS 615 as a co-requisite; open to nurse educator students only.|
NURS 620
Clinical Dec Making I
The focus of this course is clinical data gathering skills, diagnostic reasoning, and clinical problem-solving in the management of common health problems throughout the lifespan. Critical thinking skills are emphasized and honed and are used to ampl,ify common sense, intuition, and simple reasoning. Emphasis is placed upon the analysis and synthesis of client data for diagnosis and for intervention of appropriate nursing and other therapeutic interventions to be used by the advanced practice nur,se. This course if required as a prerequisite to all other clinical nursing courses and is to be taken concurrently with NURS 621. Prerequisite: NURS 615 and NURS 616. Spring, annually and as needed.|
NURS 621
Clinical Dec Making I Pract
Provides opportunity for the student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 620. Students may select experiences from a variety of clinical settings appropriate to the course focus. Three clinical hours weekly. This course must be taken as a,co-requisite to NURS 620. Prerequisite: NURS 615. Spring, annually and as needed.|
NURS 622
Family Nurse Pract Role Develo
Explores the evoloving role of the family nurse practitioner as an advanced practice nurse. Focus is on acquisition of advanced practice skills and application of decision making models that guide evidence based practice. Professional, ethical, and l,egal accountability is emphasized. Prerequisite: NURS 615 and NURS 616; must be taken concurrently with NURS 621 and NURS 620.|
NURS 630
Clinical Dec Making II
Focus is on health promotion, wellness maintenance, disease prevention, early detection of problems, prompt treatment of acute illness, and support for management and self-care during chronic conditions of children (birth through adolescence) and chi,ldbearing women. All dimension of development and the total health of the family are considered. Collaboration with other healthcare providers is fostered. Three lecture hours weekly. Must be taken concurrently with NURS 631 and NURS 632. Prereq,uisites: NURS 601, 602 and 614 and minimum grade of B in 615 and 620. Offered annually.|
NURS 631
Clin Dec Mak II Role Sem
Focus of this seminar will be clinical based research questions, client presentation, and effective treatment interventions for children (birth through adolescence) and childbearing women. Students are given an opportunity to discuss alternative app,roaches to diagnosis, advanced nursing, medical, or collaborative management in a controlled environment. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must be taken concurrently with NURS 630 and NURS 632. Prerequisites: NURS 601, 602, and 614: Minimum grade of B, in NURS 615 and 620. Offered fall annually.|
NURS 632
Clinical Dec Making II Pract
Provides an opportunity for the students to implement the objectives identified in NURS 630. Students may select experiences from a variety of clinical settings appropriate to the course focus. Six clinical hours weekly. Must be taken concurrently, with NURS 630 and NURS 631. Prerequisites: NURS 601, 602, and 614; Minimum grade of B in NURS 615 and 620. Offered fall annually.|
NURS 640
Clinical Dec Making III
Focus is on health promotion, wellness maintenance, disease prevention, early detection of problems, prompt treatment of acute illness, and support for management and self-care during chronic conditions of young, middle aged, and older adults. All d,imensions of development and the total health of the family are considered. Collaboration with other health care providers is fostered with emphasis upon the coordination and continuity of client care. Three lecture hours weekly. Must be taken con,currently with NURS 641 and NURS 642. Prerequisites: NURS 601, 602, and 614 and minimum grade of B in NURS 615, 620, and 630. Offered fall annually.|
NURS 641
Cli Dec Mak III:Role Sem
Focus of this seminar will be clinical based research questions, client presentation, and effective treatment interventions for young, middle aged, and older adults. Students are given an opportunity to discuss alternative appraoches to diagnosis, a,dvanced nursing, medical, or collaborative management in a controlled environment. Two laboratory hours weekly. Must be taken concurrently with NURS 640 and NURS 642. Pre-requisite: NURS 601, 602, and 614; Minimum grade of B in NURS 615, 620, and,630. Offered spring annually|
NURS 642
Clin Dec Making III Practicum
Provides an opportunity for the student to implement the objectives identified in NURS 640. Students may select experiences from a variety of clinical settings appropriate to the course focus. Six clinical hours weekly. Must be taken concurrently,with NURS 640 and NURS 641. Pre-requisites: NURS 601, 602, and 614; Minimum grade of B in NURS 615, 620, and 630. Offered spring annually.|
NURS 645
Nursing & Public Policy
This course examines the implications of health care financing, structuring, labor market trends, and current health care reform proposals for nursing in general and for advanced practice nursing specifically. Additionally, the student will be stimul,ated to appreciate the critical need for nurses to engage in activities, individually and as members of professional organizations, that will enhance the position of nursing in influencing health care policy and legislation at all levels-local, state,, and federal. A pervasive theme throughout the course is the ultimate goal of improving the health care of our citizens. Spring, annually.|
NURS 675
Nursing Curriculum Development
Examines curriculum development in post secondary nursing programs. Focuses on philosophical issues, learning theories, learner needs assessment, and curriculum design for target populations in various nursing education programs. Enables advanced pra,ctice nursing students to develop and evaluate curriculum for selected nursing education programs. Fall, every other year and/or as needed.|
NURS 676
Ed Strategies In Nursing
Provides a comprehensive overview of educational strategies for students who desire to function as advanced practice nurses in the educational arena. Provides the necessary theory to implement the instructional process with various populations. Exami,nes issues relevant to educational strategies and their evaluation. Students design and implement a lesson plan. Self-evaluation and critique of others are used as a method to improve teaching. Fall, every other year and as needed.|
NURS 677
Eval & Assessment In Nursing
Provides a comprehensive overview of evaluation and assessment in learning for students who desire to function as advanced practice nurses in the educational arena. Emphasizes current issues in assessment, establishment and measurement of learning ou,tcomes, and the development and utilization of assessment tools. Students design and use evaluation tools for clinical and classroom application in nursing and health education. Spring, every other year and/or as needed.|
NURS 701
DNP Role Seminar II
Synthesizes DNP competencies while providing a forum for dissemination and discussion of terminal protfolios and evidence-based research projects formulated in Clinical Scholarship I, II, and III. Prerequisites: all DNP coursework. Offered spring ann,ually.|
NURS 702
Adv Topics in Clinical Mgmt
Explores the management of complex health conditions across the lifespan with a focus on individuals and thier families. Topics will vary and be drawn from emerging fields such as genetics, immunology, behavioral health, pharmacology, and preventive,medicine.|
NURS 703
Adv Topics in Nursing Practice
Explores emerging literature related to management of complex health conditions across the lifespan. Emphasis is on health promotion and care of communities and populations. The effective utilization of health care systems, principles of epidemiolog,y, environmental health, and community partnering and planning will be examined as they relate to population health promotion.|
NURS 704
Doctor of Nurs Pract Intern I
First of two required internships. Provides students an opportunity to enhance and integrate prior learning. Student acquires and applies DNP and advanced practice competencies in a mentored setting as a preceptor care provider for individuals with, complex medical conditions. Student self-identifies learning goals/plan for faculty approval. Prerequisite: NURS 805, 806, 807, 808, 809 and specialty electives related to intership focus. Fall, annually.|
NURS 706
Doctor of Nurs Pract Intern II
Second of two required internships. Provides students additional opportunity to enhance and integrate prior learning and to acquire and apply DNP and advanced clinical practice competencies in a mentored clinical setting. Focus is on vulnerable pop,ulations and their communities. Student identifies learning goals and follow a faculty-approved plan. Prerequisite: NURS 850. Spring, annually.|
NURS 709
Doctor of Nurs Pract Capstone
Focus of this capstone course is on the development, implementation, evaluation, and dissemination of a research project that translates evidence to practice. Project will relate to the advanced practice nursing role and benefit a group, population,or community rather than an individual patient. Prerequisite: NURS 805, 806, 807, 808, 809. Enrollment by permission of instructor only. Summer, annually.|
NURS 714
Prac Strg for Adv Prac Nurses
Provides advanced practice nurses an understanding of new venture development as it prepares them to seek innovative solutions to health care issues. Approached from the perspectives of developing a business plan for independent practice as well as,thinking creatively to craft responses to social problems that impact health care.|
NURS 715
Systematic Eval in Health Care
Provides an overview of the strategies and tools for assessing and achieving improvement in health care. Adapted from the Achieving Competence Today (ACT) curriculum, students will identify and analyze systems problems that compromise the quality an,d safety of care and then develop an improvement plan.|
NURS 750
Family Nurse Practitioner Int
Provides the opportunity to gain competency in the multifaceted role of nurse practitioner through a supervised clinical experience under the guidance of certified nurse practitioners, physician assistants, or licensed physicians approved by the depa,rtment as preceptors. Prerequisites: All program course work, including completion of NURS 800. Spring annually and as needed.|
NURS 751
Nurse Educator Internship
Provides the opportunity to gain competency in the multifaceted role of nurse educator under the guidance of nurse educators approved by the department as preceptors. Prerequisities: All program course work, including completion of NURS 800. Sprin,g, annually and as needed.|
NURS 800
Research Project/Thesis
Scholarly research paper based on an innovative and/or creative study pertinent to nursing or a related area. Students register for a minimum of 3 credits and complete the thesis/project in one calendar year. Students who do not complete the thesis/p,roject in one calendar year must register for 1 additional credit each consecutive term until completion up to a maximum of 6 credits. Prerequisite: NURS 605 and 610.|
NURS 805
Doct of Nurs Parctice Role Sem
Provides an overview of program expectations while examining the roles of the DNP-prepared advanced practice nurse as expert clinician, researcher, health policy advocate, and educator. Students will begin to identify research ideas and formulate an, internship plan with the support and feedback of peers.|
NURS 806
Lead Nurs in Health Care Sys
Provides the advanced practice nurse leadership skills for empowering and influencing others to bring about change. Focus is on understanding multiple perspectives and applying theories of leadership, organizational behavior, and systems to a variet,y of settings. Ethical and legal strategies to influence procedures and policy will be emphasized.|
NURS 807
Info Mgmt in Health Care
Provides students with essential knowledge and skills to utilize information and management systems to support evidence based practice. The role of information management systems and data bases in health care will be discussed, Students will employ,information technology to implement decision suppoort programs that are pertinent to improved practice. Co-requisite: NURS 808.|
NURS 808
Analy Meth of Evd Based Prac
Emphasis is on analytical methods to critically appraise evidence-based literature and translate research to clinical practice. Students appraise current literature related to their chosen topic, constructing an evidence basis for their selected pra,ctice project. Co-requisites: NURS 807. Fall, annually.|
PH 200
Solar System Astron
Examines the motions of Earth, moon, and the planets and their effects on the appearance of the sky; the nature of the sun and the planets; the instruments of the astronomer; and the role the history of astronomy played in the development of our unde,rstanding of the sky. Includes constellation identification through the use of the planetarium. Each semester.|
PH 201
Stellar Astronomy
Explores human understanding of the nature, formation, and evolution of those celestial objects that lie beyond the solar system. Includes stellar properties and spectra, stellar evolution, special stars and star systems, the milky way and other gala,xies, cosmology, and cosmogony. Uses the planetarium for constellation study and the development of coordinate systems. Prerequisite: ES 200. Spring, annually.|
PH 251
General Physics
Introductory course for non-physics majors. Emphasizes mechanics, including vectors, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, harmonic motion, and waves. Integrates computer-based laboratory and lecture into three two-hour class per,iods. Prerequisite: Algebra. Each fall.|
PH 252
General Physics II
Introductory course for non-physics majors. Emphasizes electromagnetism and light, including electrostatics, circuits, magnetic fields, geometrical and physical optics, optical instruments, and atomic spectra. Integrates computer-based laboratory and, lecture into three two-hour class periods. Prerequisites: Algebra and either PH 251 or 261. Each Spring.|
PH 254
Ex In Spc: Exc Nanotechnology
Introductory course for science and mathematics majors. Discusses current and developing sub-micron range technologies. Includes an exposition of the physical laws governing matter-energy interactions at a microscopic level and their consequences a,nd applications to nanotechnology in areas such as mechanosynthesis, molecular sorting, assembly and manufacture, nanomechanical computation systems, and fabrication of nanoscale structural components. Relevant demonstrations and experiments may be,incorporated, depending on time and equipment availability. Prerequisites: PH 251 and/or PH 252.|
PH 258
Intro To Ph I
Introductory course for physics majors, pre-engineers, and students in other disciplines seeking an understanding of physics at a rigorous mathematical level. Emphasizes mechanics, including vectors, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational, motion, harmonic motion, and waves. PH 268 must be taken concurrently by physics majors and pre-engineers. Prerequisite: MATH 270, which may be taken concurrently. Each fall.|
PH 259
Intro To Physics Lec II
Continuation of PH 258, an introductory level course for physics majors, pre-engineers, and students in other disciplines seeking an understanding of physics at a rigorous mathematical level. Emphasizes electromagnetism and optics, including electros,tatics, circuits, magnetic fields, geometrical and physical optics, and optical instruments. PH 269 must be taken concurrently with PH 259 by physics majors and pre-engineers. Prerequisite: PH 258. Each spring.|
PH 261
Physics Of Energy & Environ
This course is the study of the physical laws and processes that underlie environmental phenomena with a special focus on energy (mechanical, thermal and electrical). We will establish both a qualitative and quantitative understanding of the underly,ing physical processes. Technical, economic, and social consequences of these laws and processes will be examined to better delineate the complex decisions related to human energy use and environmental issues. This course might serve as a substitut,e for PH 251 (General Physics I) and will prepare students equally well for PH 252 (General Physics II) should that course be required of their major. Prerequisite: Algebra|
PH 268
Intro To Ph I Lab
Complements PH 258, and should not be scheduled by students not enrolled in PH 258. Experiments include free-fall, kinematics, momentum and energy conservation, collisions, and wave phenomena. Each fall.|
PH 269
Physics Lab II
Complements PH 259, and should not be scheduled by students not enrolled in PH 258. Experiments include electrostatic phenomena, potential, circuits, magnetic forces, refraction, lens properties, atomic spectra, and interference and diffraction. Util,izes computers for data analysis and presentation. Each spring.|
PH 270
Condensed Matter Lab Practicum
This course is an introduction to the processes for constructing sub-micron sized mechanisms. The practicum consists of six emphases: Materials, Safety & Equipment; Basic Contact Lithography, Basic Etching and Deposition Techniques: Thin Film Deposi,tion and Etching Practices; Design and Mast Fabrication; Material Modification Processes; and Characterization, Packaging, and Testing of sub-micron devices. Prerequisite: PH 254, and acceptance into the NMT Capstone Semester at Penn State, and must, complete a university petition for an independent study course prior to enrollment. Each semester (Summer recommended)|
PH 301
Astrophysics I
Explores the lives of stars using the principles of physics and the tools of astronomy. Topics include celestial mechanics, spectroscopy, stellar atmospheres, stellar interiors, binary stars, nucleosynthesis, energy transport, supernovae, white dwar,fs, neutron stars, and black holes. Prerequisites: PH 258 and PH/ES 201. Spring, every other year.|
PH 302
Astrophysics II
Explores the objects of the Solar System and the Universe using the principles of physics and the tools of astronomy. Topics include the nature and formatin of the planets and asteroids, the morphology and dynamics of the Milky Way, the nature and e,volution of galaxies, the large-scale structure of the Universe, and cosmology. Prerequisites: PH 301 and MATH 272. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
PH 351
Mech & Dynamics
Intermediate course in the mechanics. Uses techniques from vector analysis and differential equations to study mechanics at a level above that of PH 258. Includes Newton's laws of motion, rectilinear motion under the influence of a variable force, os,cillatory motion, energy, momentum, motion in three dimensions, central forces, celestial mechanics, systems of particles, and rigid body motion. Prerequisites: PH 252 or 259; MATH 350. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
PH 352
Elec & Magnetism
An intermediate-level course in electricity and magnetism. Uses vector algebra extensively in the presentation and development of the basic empirical laws of electromagnetism, and introduces vector calculus as required in the derivation and expressio,n of Maxwell's equations. Includes electrostatics, dielectric media, current and circuits, magnetic fields, magnetic media, Maxwell's equations for vacuum and dielectric media, and electromagnetic waves. Prerequisites: PH 259 (or 252) and MATH 350 wh,ich may be taken concurrently. Spring, odd-numbered years.|
PH 353
Modern Physics I
Intermediate course in modern physics. Includes relativity, kinetic theory of matter, the photon, electron waves, the Bohr model of the hydrogen atom, the Schrodinger wave equation, solution of the Schrodinger wave equation for the hydrogen atom, ato,mic physics. Prerequisites: PH 252 or 259; MATH 270 with MATH 271 concurrently. Fall, even-numbered years.|
PH 354
Optics
Intermediate course in geometrical, physical, and modern optics. Includes thin lenses, thick lenses, interference, diffraction, polarization, color theory, spectra, lasers, holography, and fiber optics. Prerequisites: PH 252 or 259; MATH 271, with MA,TH 272 concurrently. Fall, odd-numbered years.|
PH 355
Mod Physics II
Continuation of Modern Physics I. Includes structure and spectra of molecules, band theory of solids, structure of the nucleus, radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation detectors, and elementary particles. Prerequisites: PH 353, MATH 272. Spri,ng, odd-numbered years.|
PH 356
Thermodynamics
Intermediate course in heat. Develops basic concepts and principles more intensively in the study of properties of gases and in thermodynamics. Some of the specific topics studied are temperature measurements, thermal expansion, specific heat, ther,mal conductivity of solids and liquids, thermal properties of gases, change in phase, and heat engines. Prerequisites: PH 252 or 259; MATH 350, which may be taken concurrently. Spring, even-numbered years.|
PH 357
Condensed Matter Physics
The course is an introduction to the structure and properties of the solid state of matter. Topics to be covered are the energy band theory of solids, composition and symmetry of crystal lattices, bonding and imperfections in crystals, and semicondu,ctor composition and construction. Prerequisite: MATH 272, which may be taken concurrently. Spring, even-numbered years.|
PH 371
Experimental Physics I
Intermediate-to advanced-level laboratory. Includes experiments spanning the areas of heat, mechanics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Students select experiments from these areas according to their interests and,background, and as dictated by equipment availability. Emphasizes measurement precision and careful error analysis. Includes one lecture hour per week and three laboratory hours per week (individually arranged). Prerequisites: junior-senior stand,ing, and completion (or co-registration in) at least two of the following courses: PH 351, 352, 353, 354, or 355. Each fall.|
PH 372
Experimental Physics II
Continuation of Experimental Physics I. The one-hour lecture requirement is omitted, and the student completes a different set of experiments. Prerequisites: PH 371 and completion of (or co-registration in) at least four of the following courses: PH,351, 352, 353, 354, 355, 356, or 357. Each fall.|
PH 400
Special Topics
This course includes an introduction to gate circuits, Boolean algebra in the minimization of gate circuits, flip-flops, counters, timers, the design, operation, and programming of microcomputers, D/A and A/D conversion, and the interfacing of integr,ated circuits to external devices. Prerequisite: PH 259/269 or PH 252, and MATH 271.|
PH 453
Ind Study Phys Mea
Examines the theory and application of precision measuring instruments spanning many areas of physics. Experiments are developed to fit the background and needs of the individual student, utilizing equipment from the various laboratories of the Phys,ics Department. Students spend from three to six hours in the laboratory, depending on the number of credits elected in consultation with their advisors.|
PH 455
Analog Electronics
Introduces network analysis, A.C. circuits, and solid state devices. Includes discrete devices, power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, and operational amplifiers. Emphasizes application of circuits to scientific instruments. Prerequisites: PH 259/2,69 or PH 252, and a course in integral calculus. Spring, even-numbered years.|
PH 457
Demo In Physics
Designed for the secondary education major in physics and may not be used as a physics elective for the B.A. or B.S. in physics major. Stresses preparation and performance of classroom demonstrations for use in secondary schools. Prerequisite: PH 252, or 259. On demand.|
PH 460
Intro To Math Ph
Uses the techniques of vector calculus and differential equations to treat problems in mechanics, electricity, and other areas of physics at a level intended to prepare the physics major for graduate level work. Discusses and applies analog and digit,al computer techniques to a variety of physical problems. Prerequisites: PH 258, 259, mathematics through MATH 350. On demand.|
PH 461
Seminar
Develops skills in literature-survey and library research in specific areas in conjunction with the preparation and presentation of formal reports on research topics. Prerequisites: Senior standing, science major. Spring, annually.|
PH 498
Research In Physics I
Gives junior or senior physics majors useful experience in the techniques of laboratory research in physics. Students will either participate in an on-going research project under the guidance of a faculty member, or initiate an investigation of the,ir own. A final report in a form suitable for publication will be expected upon conclusion of the project. Can serve as a substitute for PH 372: Experimental Physics II. Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor. Students wishing to enroll in, PH 498 must complete a university petition for an independent study course during the semester prior to enrollment in the course.|
PH 499
Research In Physics II
Continuation of PH 498, to permit completion of lengthy research activities initiated in PH 498, for which one semester is insufficient. Continuation is at the discretion of the project director, and the credits may not be substituted for other phys,ics requirements. The same prerequisites must be fulfilled as for PH 498, except that notification of the department chair must precede any independent study deadlines set by the university.|
PHIL 100
Philosophy Goes to the Movies
This course will explore and evaluate various philosophical themes and problems through the use of popular films chosen for their philosophical content. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 111
Logic I - Critical Thinking
Develops students' skills in analyzing arguments. Examines forms of faulty reasoning and evaluates criteria for the evaluation of arguments. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 115
Philosophy & Pop Culture
Introduces students to traditional philosophical topics and problems by reflecting on popular culture and contemporary cultural products such as films, literature, and music. Annually|
PHIL 211
Intro To Phil
Introduces students to philosophical topics spanning the history of philosophy. Includes the nature of reality, knowledge and morality. Students will gain a deeper appreciation of the Socratic maxim: an unexamined life is not worth living. No prerequ,isite. Annually.|
PHIL 212
Ethics
Introduces students to theoretical ethics and the consequences these theories have both personally and for public policy. Examines controversial moral issues. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 215
Religions Of The World
Examines the philosophies and practices of the religions of the world, emphasizing Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. No prerequisite. Annually|
PHIL 300
Ancient Greek Phil
Thinkers of ancient Greece, with special attention to Plato and Aristotle. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 301
Bioethics
An inquiry into traditional and contemporary ethical issues in medicine, one of the most popular topics in applied ethics. Medical research, practice and public policy are addressed. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (minimum)|
PHIL 302
Environmental Philosophy
An inquiry into the philosophical aspects of issues concerning the environment. Environmental theories, policies, and practices are addressed. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (minimum). Every other year|
PHIL 303
Freud And Philosophy
The task of this course is to study Freud's psychoanalytic theory and its influence on philosophy. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing (minimum). Offered annually|
PHIL 306
Modern Philosophy
A survey of philosophy during the 17th and 18th century, with special focus on Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 308
Contemp Ethical Issues
This course will examine and critically evaluate contemporary ethical issues. Topics may include, but are not limited to, biomedical ethics, business ethics, ethics and education, and environmental ethics. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 311
Logic II - Symbolic Logic
A course in formal logic. Consists of a detailed examination of the logical structure, semantics, and proof methods of both sentential and predicate logic, as well as the application of those logics to ordinary English sentences and arguments. No pre,requisite. Annually.|
PHIL 312
Philosophy And Literature
This course will examine and critically evaluate various philosophical themes and problems through the use of literature chosen for its philosophical content. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 317
Logic III-Scientific Reasoning
This course is a critical thinking course focused specifically on scientific claims and theories and on the scientific method itself. Students will be taught how to recognize and reconstruct inductive arguments typically employed by scientists; e.g.,, inductive generalizations, arguments from analogy, hypothetico-deductive arguments, etc., and will be taught how to evaluate these arguments for logical merit. Common problems in reasoning effectively regarding scientific issues (e.g. ad hoc auxil,iary hypothesis, rival theories, etc.) will be discussed as will be solutions to these problems.|
PHIL 325
Spec Top In Phil
As needed.|
PHIL 328
Ethics and Criminal Justice
This course is a survey of ethical issues for practitioners within the criminal justice system. Topics include: ethics of decision-making, origins of the concept of justice, dilemmas of police officers as crime fighters and public servants, fighting, corruption, ethics and investigative methods, ethics as it relates to punishment, institutional and community corrections.|
PHIL 330
Philosophy of Art
The task of the course is to examine the nature and value of art and artistic activity. The course examines the main theories of what art is and what role art should play in our lives. Sophomore standing or permission of instructor.|
PHIL 352
Theory Of Knowledge
Detailed examination of the concepts of knowledge and of justified belief. Considers and evaluates various theories regarding the nature of these concepts. Investigates the possible sources of knowledge and justified belief. Critically examines vario,us skeptical hypotheses. No prerequisite. Every other year.|
PHIL 357
Philosophy And Feminism
Examines traditional and contemporary feminist theories and their consequences for social and political philosophy. Explores various aspects of gender and attitudes concerning the nature of human beings discussed. No prerequisite. Every third year.|
PHIL 360
Existentialism
Existentialism understands the human being as the one for whom its own existence is in question. To be human is to ask, implicitly or explicitly, the question of what it means to be. Existentialism, therefore, accords the self-questioning individual,a privileged position from which to draw out philosophical insights on (1) rationality, (2) language, (3) values, (4) time, (5) meaning of human existence, (6) inter-personal relations, and (7) God, among other themes. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PHIL 400
Independent Study: Philosophy
Concentrated exploration of an area of philosophy not covered by existing courses and under the direction of department faculty member. Prior to enrolling, students are required to submit a written proposal outlining their plan of study. Enrollment, limited to juniors and seniors with consent of the instructor. Maximum number of credits in PHIL 400 is limited to nine.|
PHIL 410
Philosophy Of Mind
Detailed investigation into the fundamental nature of mental phenomena. Discusses various theories of mind, e.g., dualism, philosophical behaviorism, philosophical functionalism, etc. Examines issues involving mental content, mental causation, and co,nsciousness. Prerequisite: PHIL 111 or 211 or permission of instructor. Every other year.|
PHSC 110
Intro To Environ Chemistry
Provides a knowledge of basic chemical principles. Applies this knowledge to environmental issues such as water resources and water pollution, air quality, ozone depletion, and disposal of dangerous wastes. Three hours lecture. Open to all student,s in all academic areas. No prerequisites. Each semester.|
PHSC 111
Physical Science Chem
Explores selected chemical principles with the purpose of providing a background that will enable students to understand issues involving the interaction of science and society. Intended for non-science majors and does not assume prior familiarity w,ith chemistry. Does not count toward requirements for science majors, but can be applied to fulfill the general education math-science requirements for non-science majors. Students who prefer a more traditional chemistry course may elect either CHEM,151 or 153 to fulfill their general education requirements. No prerequisites. Each semester.|
PHSC 112
Bas Phys Sci Phys & Astr
Intended for students not majoring in the sciences or mathematics, and does not presume any prior familiarity with the subject. Science and math majors will not receive credit for this course. Discusses the nucleus of the atom and radioactivity, fund,amentals of electricity and simple circuits, and descriptive astronomy. Integrates experiments with the subject matter to develop theory from an experimental basis. Uses the Planetarium extensively in conjunction with the section in astronomy. No pre,requisite. Each semester or on demand.|
PHSC 113
Exp 20th Cent Phy For Non Sci
Intended for students not majoring in the sciences or mathematics and presumes no prior familiarity with the subject. Science and math majors will not receive credit for this course. Discusses a variety of topics in solid state physics and modern q,uantum mechanics including energy levels and bands, emission of electromagnetic radiation, wave-particle duality, and quantum tunneling. Integrates demonstrations, hands-on experiments, computer visualization programs, and in-class discussion to dev,elop conceptual models from an experimental basis. No prerequisite. Each semester or on demand.|
PHSC 116
Aerodynamics: Ph/Bio Of Flight
The biomechanics of flight. Students will use techniques in physics and evolutionary biology to study how animals fly and swim. Drawing upon bats, birds, insects, and even winged seeds, we will discuss and test the basic operating principles of win,gs. We will apply results obtained with a wind tunnel to the locomotion of objects in water. Students will then be able to compare and contrast the flyers and swimmers of nature with those of human invention. The course will have a substantial stu,dio laboratory component. Offered every other fall.|
PHSC 117
Explor Phy Sci: Phys & Astron
Explores selected physical principles with the purpose of providing a background that will enable students to understand physical phenomena. Intended for non-science majors and does not presume any prior familiarity with the subject. Students who hav,e already successfully completed PHSC 112 will not get credit for the course. Topics may include motion, heat, the nucleus of the atom and radioactivity, fundamentals of electricity and simple circuits, atmospheric physics, and descriptive astronomy., Every spring|
PHSC 320
Phy Sci Antiquity To 20th Cent
Focuses on the most important and influential theories that scientists have developed to explain the natural world and examines how those theories were conceived and refined. Considers both the process and the content of Western science and examine,s the progression of science from ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia through the quantum revolution of the early 20th century. Explores how the work of scientists has been affected by the historical and cultural settings in which they lived. Prerequisite,s: PHSC 111 or 112 or permission of instructor|
PS 110
Politics & Public Affairs
An introduction to the study of politics through examination of the ways the political process affects, shapes and frames selected current issues or policy dilemmas. Topics will vary from semester to semester, but may include the following issues in,public affairs: terrorism, immigration, health care, social movements, civil liberties, education, foreign and defense policy, budgeting, environmental issues, and energy policy.|
PS 210
Intro To Political Sci
A comprehensive introduction to the political world, examining the mutlidimensional force shaping the contemporary scene. In addition to coverage of the classical topics such as political theory, idealogies, political regimes, bureaucracy, comparati,ve and international politics, the course examines the impacts of the contemporary factors such as globalization and political economy, the demand for universal human rights, terrorism, and environmental politics. Each semester.|
PS 211
American Government
Study of the general principles of the American system of constitutional government emphasizing the organization and functions of the national government--legislative, executive, and judicial. Examines the rights and duties of citizenship, the electo,rate, political parties, civil rights, and the growing regulatory function of government. Each semester.|
PS 302
Politics And Film
Explores the relationship between movies, political attitudes, and the real world of American politics and government. Examines Hollywood's depiction of the presidency, campaigns and candidates, the mass media, political culture, and the struggle for, civil rights and social justice. Introduces students to seminal political films and relevant readings that help place the movies and their messages in the context of important political events. Prerequisite: PS 210 or 211 or permission of the instru,ctor. Every year.|
PS 304
Crime, Politic & Public Policy
Course treats the ways in which government treats crime as a public policy matter, with a predominant focus on legislative and executive branch activity. Topics may vary somewhat from year to year. Examples of policies to be examined and evaluated,include: reducing the incidence of crime, the politics of imprisonment, punitive and restorative justice, decriminalization, drugs and crime, death penalty, gun control, hate crimes, zero tolerance approaches, pornography, corporate crime, organize,d crime, and terrorism. The constitutional and legal framework of policies will also be considered.|
PS 311
Comparative Politics
Considers the central issues of comparative political inquiry, with an emphasis on advanced industrial nations and Latin America. On demand.|
PS 325
Politics And Religion
Investigates the ways in which politics and religion interrelate, using theoretical and behavioral approaches. Examines issues in both domestic and international politics. Prerequisite: PS 210 or 211 or permission of instructor. Every other year.|
PS 350
Special Topics
Offered occasionally.|
PS 351
State Local Government
Detailed study of how our state and local governments function. Emphasizes Pennsylvania government. Requires independent study through outside projects. Every other year.|
PS 352
Internat Politics
Presents a framework for analyzing the behavior of states, the basic factors which motivate and affect international policies, and the techniques of resolving international conflicts. Every other year.|
PS 354
Const Law Of U S
A study of the development of the Constitution through the interpretations of the Supreme Court. Includes a study of the separation of governmental powers, political and judicial processes, federalism as a legal device, and the relationship of libert,y and authority to the individual living under government. Prerequisite: PS 211. Spring, annually.|
PS 355
Media, Elec & Party Politics
A survey course emphasizing the electorate, pressure groups, and public opinion, nature and history of political parties, party organization, methods of nominations, and elections. Examines the place of political parties and elections as instruments,of democracy and their place in the framework of Pennsylvania's government. Fall, alternating years.|
PS 356
Congress & Legis Process
Examines the legislative process in American representative government with primary concern given to the structure, operation, and development of the U.S. Congress.|
PS 357
The American Presidency
Examines the history, practice, and political ideas related to the institution of the American presidency. Emphasizes the presidency's place within the constitutional system of separated powers and how that institution has evolved into the office we,see today. Alternate Fall Semesters.|
PS 363
Criminal Procedure
A study of the law as it relates to arrest, search, and seizure with emphasis on present controlling legal decisions and historical development, philosophy, and public policy issues underlying these decisions. Prerequisite: PS 211, CRJT 110 or permi,ssion of instructor. Annually|
PS 364
Cons Law-Civil Rghts/Lib
A study of the development of the Constitution of the United States through an examination of the decisions of the Supreme Court in the area of civil rights and liberties. Introduces some legal terminology and the case method. Prerequisite: PS 211. S,pring, odd-numbered years.|
PS 365
Anc-Med Pol Thgt
Explores the development of political theory from Plato to Machiavelli. Every year.|
PS 366
Political Ideologies
Explores the development of political thinking in the modern period, emphasizing the development of ideologies. Particular attention given to liberalism, conservatism, Marxist and non-Marxist socialism, fascism, libertarianism, environmentalism, and,contemporary liberation ideologies. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing|
PS 375
Public Policy And Admin
Introduces public administration emphasizing its function in the American political process. Applied public administration theory and practice to enduring and contemporary public policy challenges and achievements. Every other year.|
PS 395
Amer Political Thought
Examines major political thinkers and ideas which have shaped the American political tradition. Emphasizes the competing ideas of government which were influential at the time of the American founding. Considers contemporary competing paradigms in Am,erican political thought.|
PS 398
Empirical Political Analysis
Introduces students to the fundamental concepts and research methods used in political science. Provides students with an understanding of how and why political scientists conduct political research. Because the use of statistical/ empirical analysis, is an important part of the research process, students will be introduced to statistical applications used in political science. Prerequisites: MATH 221 or 222, CIS 110 and 217, or consent of instructor. Every other year.|
PSY 111
Psych Of Personal Growth
Emphasizes personal growth, enabling each student to explore self-identity, social relationships, and environmental influences. Explores problems of personality, resolution of conflicts and stress, and the role of emotions in behavior, relationships,, and health. No prerequisite. Each semester at Clarion. Annually at Venango.|
PSY 122
Drugs, Society & Behavior
Reviews common legal and illegal drugs, modes of action, causes of abuse, and available treatments. The focus of this class is to raise students' awareness of these issues, not to provide treatment or training in drug abuse rehabilitation. No prere,quisite. Annually.|
PSY 211
General Psychology
Introduces the general subject matter of psychology as a science and its major findings. Emphasizes genetics, development, learning and motivation, emotions, sensation and perception, personality and abnormal adjustment, and other social behavior. No, prerequisite. Each semester at both Clarion and Venango Campuses.|
PSY 212
Brain And Behavior
Introduces the relationships between brain and behavior.|
PSY 220
Human Sexuality
Provides students with an overview of the area of human sexuality. Begins with an explanation of how human sexuality is studied. Includes a discussion of sex roles; the biological division of males and females; the physiology of the human sexual resp,onse cycle; and sexual behavior such as homosexuality, sexual coercion, and sexual dysfunctions. Covers health issues such as sexually transmitted diseases, birth control, pregnancy, and childbirth. No prerequisite. Each semester.|
PSY 228
Human Behav/Orgs
Explores how basic psychological principles can be used to describe, explain, and predict individuals' on-the-job thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Includes personality, motivation, perception, attitudes, stress, communication, learning, leadership,, group behavior, cooperation, decision-making, and research methods. B.S. business administration majors can apply this course to free electives only. No prerequisite. On demand at both the Clarion and Venango Campuses.|
PSY 230
Stat Methods
Covers basic descriptive and inferential statistical techniques (frequency distributions, measures of variability and central tendency, correlation, regression, z, t). Gives special attention during class and a required laboratory meeting to the use,of those techniques in dealing with data in the behavioral sciences and their importance in the research endeavor. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Each semester.|
PSY 240
Crit Think & Writing In Psych
Develops cognitive and writing skills linked with success in psychology, a field in which thinking and writing critically enable effective writing and work. Prerequisites: PSY 211; limited to psychology and sociology/psychology majors. Annually.|
PSY 251
Research Methds Beh Sci
Familiarizes students with methods used by psychologists to systematically collect information about the behavior of people and other animals. Experiments are conducted during laboratory meetings, and the appropriate style of writing research reports, is emphasized. PSY 211 and 230, with at least a C in PSY 230, are prerequisites; concurrent registration with PSY 230 permitted only with consent of the instructor. Each semester.|
PSY 252
Research Meth Lab
Experiments are conducted during laboratory meetings and particular attention is given to the appropriate A.P.A. style of writing research reports. Concurrent registration or previous credit for PSY 251 is required. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and at leas,t a C grade in PSY 230. Each semester.|
PSY 253
Intro To Gerontology
Provide a general introduction to social gerontology. Emphasizes the typical aspects of aging. Reviews current hypotheses and findings concerning aging processes. No prerequisite. Annually.|
PSY 260
Developmental Psych
Surveys research and theory on human life-span development. Students study social, cognitive, emotional, and physical aspects of development from conception to death. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Each semester at Clarion. Annually at Venango.|
PSY 300
Cross-Cultural Psychology
Introduces students to research on the similarities and differences among different racial and ethnic groups in the United States and around the world. Examines research in several areas of psychology, such as developmental, social, cognitive, etc. E,ncourages students to apply the research to daily life in discussions of stereotyping, aggression, intelligence, motivation, etc. Prerequisite: PSY 211|
PSY 321
Psy Of Adolescence
Focuses on the cognitive, emotional, social, and physical changes of adolescence. Through such topics as emerging sexuality, intimacy, identity formation, moral development, and vocational development, students will gain an appreciation for the uniqu,e developmental challenges of adolescence. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and 260. Annually.|
PSY 325
Community Psychology
Community psychology focuses on the connections between the individual and the community in order to develop interventions which will prevent social problems and promote psychological health. Students will learn how to apply the community psychology, approach to specific social issues. They will become familiar with local and national community based intervention programs and will learn how to conduct assessment and evaluation research on such programs. Prerequisite: PSY 211.|
PSY 330
Psychology Of Happiness
What is happiness? How can we achieve happiness? This course is an exploration of the new area of positive psychology which is concerned with using science to discover the factors which make like meaningful, create happiness, and enable individuals a,nd communities to thrive. Positive psychologists see happiness as a skill which can be studied, taught and learned. This course will look at evidence from the biological, cognitive, social, and clinical areas of psychology in order to understand happ,iness, with the aim of using what we learn to improve our own lives. Prerequisite: PSY 211 or by permission of instructor. Spring or summer, once every two years|
PSY 331
Child Psychology
Focuses on cognitive, social, emotional, and physical development from conception through childhood. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and 260. Annually at both Clarion and Venango.|
PSY 340
Psych Of Women
Introduces students to the roles involved with being men and women, to the ideologies in various feminist theories, and to past and present research in the area of psychology of women. One of the purposes of the course is to demonstrate how bias (esp,ecially sexism) can creep into the research process, work situations, and personal lives, and the importance of both male and female perspectives in each of these areas. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Annually.|
PSY 350
Industrial Psychology
Focuses on applying theories and methods of scientific psychology to improve the way organizations select, train, motivate, retain, and evaluate employees. No prerequisite, but PSY 211 and 230 are recommended. Annually.|
PSY 352
Psychopharmacology
Examines how drugs effect neurotransmitter systems to control behavior. Emphasizes neurochemical and neuroanatomical explanations of pharmacological effects. Examines the major classes of psychoactive drugs with respect to the mechanism of action of,the drug and what the drug effect reveals about normal central nervous system functioning. Prerequisite: PSY 211 or consent of instructor. Annually.|
PSY 354
Abnormal Psychology
Surveys the principal forms of behavior disorders, emphasizing their etiology, diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Each semester.|
PSY 355
Social Psychology
The scientific study of social behavior and interpersonal relationships. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Annually.|
PSY 357
Intro To Psy Test
Covers the nature and use of tests, including intelligence, personality, aptitude, interests, and achievement. Students prepare behavior objectives, construct tests of items which sample the objectives, administer the tests, and analyze the results.,Prerequisite: PSY 211, 230, or the permission of the instructor. On demand.|
PSY 360
Current Topics
Focuses on a single, broad contemporary issue of current interest in psychology and related fields of study. Course content varies from semester to semester. May be taken three times for credit. Prerequisite: PSY 211. On demand.|
PSY 362
Cognitive Psychology
Examines information processing, human memory, attention, mental representation, problem solving, and intelligence, to understand the complexities of human cognitive processes. Considers contemporary and historical models of mind to determine their u,sefulness in understanding the psychological bases of thinking. Prerequisite: PSY 211. Annually.|
PSY 364
Intro Counseling & Psychothpy
Introduces students to basic methods in counseling and psychotherapy. Students will practice entry-level writing and communication skills with peers under close supervision. Annually.|
PSY 370
Forensic Psychology
Reviews the emerging field of Forensic Psychology, including issues related to legal competency, insanity plea, eyewitness testimony, determination of truth, criminal profiling, jury selection, discrimination, sexual harrassment, and child custody,determination with a focus on the role of the professional Psychologist in these areas. Prerequisite: PSY 211|
PSY 380
App Of Behavioral Prin
Assists students in applying general behavioral principles to personal change as well as to change that they initiate with clients in entry-level human services positions. Prerequisite: Nine hours in psychology or by permission of instructor. Annuall,y.|
PSY 390
Research In Gender Psych
Students will conduct empirical research on gender as a biological, psychological, and social experience. Through reading, lecture, and discussion they will have the opportunity to compare the results of their own investigations to those found in bo,th classic and current studies of gender. Prerequisite: PSY 211 and a course in statistics (PSY 230, MATH 221, or ECON 221)|
PSY 392
Independent Study
|
PSY 393
Independent Study
Students explore an area of special interest in depth for variable credit under the supervision of a member of the department and with approval of the chairperson. Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisite: PSY 211.|
PSY 401
Indiv Research Project
Students conduct research under the direction of an individual faculty member in the department. Work culminates in a paper of professional quality. Students present their research in a public forum. Registration requires prior approval of instructor,. Taught on an individual instruction basis. Prerequisites: PSY 211, 230, 251, and approval of instructor. As approved.|
PSY 427
Tests & Measurements In Psych
Reviews theories of test construction and measurement theory with application to Psychological tests and research instruments. Students will develop an instrument and provide data to support its reliability and validity. Prerequisite: a course in,statistics or by permission of instructor.|
PSY 452
Physiological Psychology
Analyzes the physical and biological mechanisms underlying behavior. Includes drugs and behavior, perception, emotions and motivation, sleep, learning and memory, language, psychopathology, etc. Introduces a variety of laboratory methods and techniqu,es via demonstrations. Open to juniors and seniors. Prerequisites: PSY 211, 230, and 251 or with consent of instructor. Annually.|
PSY 453
Human Neuropsychology
This course will focus on what is known about the human brain, particularly the neocortex, and how it effects behavior. The course will examine principles of brain function, basics of neurological examination, and the structural-functional relations,hips emerging from the frontiers of neuroscience, particularly the study of the human neocortex.|
PSY 454
Personality
Surveys several of the major theories of personality development and structure from the classic ideas of Freud and Jung to the current cognitive theories of Bandura. Also covers trait and humanistic approaches. Prerequisite: PSY 211 and 6 credit hour,s in Psychology or permission of instructor. Annually.|
PSY 455
Learning and Memory
Surveys attempts to understand and explain learning and memory. Emphasizes a comparison of current theories and their implications when applied to forms of learning and memory from the simple to the complex. Prerequisites: PSY 211, 230, and 251 or wi,th consent of instructor. Annually.|
PSY 456
History And Systems
Examines the foundations of psychological thought and its development from Greek civilization through the reformation and to a period of quasi-maturity in the formal system of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Prerequisites: PSY 211, 230, and 2,51. Annually.|
PSY 458
Sensation Percep
Examines the sensory-perceptual processes with a view to understanding their structure, properties, and role in psychological functioning. Emphasizes physiological processes involved in sensation and their concomitant limitations on the psychological, processes of perception. Prerequisite: PSY 211, 230, and 251 or with consent of instructor. Every other year.|
PSY 464
Theories Of Counseling
Introduces the field of counseling and psychotherapy. Surveys the major models in the field, with focus on assumptions and applications in a variety of settings. Covers professional issues, ethics, and current topics. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and 354 (,or approval of instructor). Each semester.|
PSY 467
Adult Development and Aging
Study of the changes in human behavior from late adulthood until death. Emphasizes the physical, emotional, intellectual, and social aspects of later life. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and 260. Annually.|
PSY 470
Senior Seminar
Applies what students have learned about psychological theory and practice to controversial issues, with the intent of developing students' expertise in psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 211, 230, and 251. Annually.|
PSY 471
Intro To Cln Child Psy
Introduces clinical work with children. Includes major diagnostic categories and theories of etiology related to clinical problems in children, as well as an overview of evaluation methods and treatment modalities designed specifically for children.,Covers professional issues and ethics related to child clinical psychology. Prerequisites: PSY 211 and 260; PSY 331 is recommended; (or approval of instructor). Annually.|
PSY 475
Health Psychology
The area of psychology that is concerned with the interaction between biological, psychological, and social factors that influence people's health and susceptibility to illness. Discusses health promotion and illness prevention from a biopsychosocial, perspective. Examines extensively the relationship between stress and illness, and discusses medical compliance, the Type A Behavior Pattern, and patient physician interactions. Prerequisite: PSY 211, 230 & 251. On demand.|
PSY 499
Supr Field Experience
In consultation with the instructor prior to registration, students select a human or community service agency. Requires 10 hours per week. Students observe and experience skills needed in the helping professions. May be repeated once for credit but,must be used under free electives the second time. Open to students in education, health, and human service programs. Prerequisites: Junior standing, PSY 211, and at least one of PSY 350, 380, 464, 467. Each semester.|
RADT 301
Radiation Ther Trmt Plan
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in Radiation Therapy, RADT 301 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
RADT 302
Radiation Thrp Trmt Delivery
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in radiation Therapy, RADT 302 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
RADT 303
Radiation Thrp Pnt Care & Ed
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in radiation Therapy, RADT 303 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technolony (JRCERT).|
RADT 401
Radiation Thrp Clin Concepts
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in radiation Therapy, RADT 401 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiolologic Technology (JRCERT).|
RADT 402
Radiation Thrp Clin Appl
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in radiation Therapy, RADT 402 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
RADT 403
Radiation Thrp Radiation Prot
Within the Bachelor of Science in Medical Imaging Sciences degree program and concentration in radiation Therapy, RADT 403 will facilitate transference of a block of 1 to 12 credits for completion of a formal, accredited clinical educational program,in radiation therapy that is recognized by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).|
RE 270
Real Estate Fund
Introduces the broad area of real estate. Lays foundation of important principles for in-depth study. First in a two-sequence course (with RE 271) required to fulfill the educational requirement for licensure as a real estate salesperson in the state, of Pennsylvania. Each semester.|
RE 271
Real Estate Practice
Introduces the practice of real estate brokerage, real estate appraisal, real estate finance, and real estate investments. Second in a two-sequence course (with RE 270) required to fulfill the educational requirement for licensure as a real estate sa,lesperson in the state of Pennsylvania. Prerequisite: RE 270. Annually.|
RE 372
Real Estate Law
Covers the legal relationships and legal instruments used in the practice of real estate. Prerequisite: RE 270. Annually.|
RE 373
Real Estate Finance
A study of the methods of financing the purchase of real estate. Prerequisite or co-requisite: RE 271 or FIN 370. Annually.|
RE 374
Real Estate Mktg & Brokerage
Examines real estate marketing and brokerage management. Topics include the regulatory environment, marketing, advertising, sales management, and personal selling. Prerequisite or Co-requisite: RE 271 or permission of Instructor. Offered biennially,.|
RE 470
Residential Real Est App
Introduces the principles of real estate appraisal. Focuses primarily upon those appraisal techniques and analyses which concern the estimation of the value of residential and commercial properties. Prerequisite or co-requisite: RE 271. Offered bienn,ially.|
RE 471
Real Estate Market & Invest An
Provides the necessary background to evaluate prospective real estate investment analysis. Examines both financial and non-financial aspects of investing in real property including risk, market analysis, portfolio impacts, and income taxation conseq,uences. Prerequisites: RE 271. Offered biennially.|
RE 472
Income Prop Appraisal
Provides advanced instruction in income property appraisal. Addresses the techniques and analysis necessary to estimate the value of an income producing property. Prerequisite: RE 470. Offered on demand.|
RE 475
Real Estate Mgmt
Provides instruction in the management of real property. Examines the maintenance, operation, and marketing of real estate. Prerequisite or co-requisite: RE 271. Offered biennially.|
RE 570
RE Market and Invest Analysis
This course will examine the fundamentals of real estate analysis. It will explore real property law, appraisal, finance, market and investment analysis, and property management.|
REHB 126
Intro To Human Services
This course serves as an interdisciplinary orientation to the field of human services, including education, mental health, substance abuse, gerontology, disability, youth services, rehabilitation, and criminal justice. The history and philosophy of,human services, human services as careers, and function of human services agencies are explored with an emphasis placed on the reciprocal interactions between human service providers and their consumers.|
REHB 211
Paraeducators & Hum Ser Pract
This course serves paraprofessionals functioning as instructional assistants in the classroom and those providing home-health and long-term care services in a variety of settings. Knowledge and practical skills in the history of the profession; lega,l requirements and parameters; mental, physical, and emotional conditions affecting students and clients; roles and responsibilites; communication; effective strategies and techniques; and required tasks in a variety of work environments will form th,e basis of the course. Prerequisite: REHB 126. Venango Campus.|
REHB 227
Neuro Impair & Phys Disorders
Presents the major physical disabilities, the reaction of family and individuals to the disability, therapeutic procedures, rehabilitation services, and direct contacts with persons with disabilities. Prerequisite: REHB 126. Each semester on Clarion,Campus, and Fall Semester at Venango Campus.|
REHB 250
Human Relations Skills
Assists students in acquiring knowledge and skill in the performance of required tasks and/or roles of rehabilitative service staff in developing humanizing environments for persons with disabilities in various settings. Prerequisites: SPED 126.|
REHB 295
Field Experience
A half-time, full-semester field experience in selected programs. Focuses on assisting in the delivery of human/educational services to persons with disabilities. Prerequisites: Minimum of 45 semester hours and SPED 230, 235, and 245. Offered at Vena,ngo Campus only.|
REHB 296
Seminar For Rehb 295
This required companion course to REHB 295 will enable students to have the opportunity to come together to discuss their field experiences in a structured seminar setting. This will provide them with the opportunity to better understand and integra,te agency activities such as assessment, treatment planning, team meetings, case management, and therapeutic interventions. In addition, the students will be able to discuss and appreciate agency policies, procedures, and interpersonal communication,. Prerequisite: REHB 126, SPED 220, REHB 227, SPED 230, SPED 235.|
REHB 345
Sec Trans & Voc Serv
Examines issues and options relative to secondary educational and vocational services for the disabled. Prerequisites: REHB 227 and SPED 220. Each semester.|
REHB 370
Assmt in Human Serv & Rehab
This coursefeatures a practical hands-on approach to assessment with a variety of specific populations. Target groups include persons in need of human services, to include disadvantaged, developmental disabilities, mental health and substance abuse/,depedency disorders, and aging and child/adolescent populations. The course covers assessment fundamentals, standardized instruments for use with specific populatins and practical techniques and strategies, leading to the formulation of therapeutic,treatment plans. Prerequisities: REHB 126 and REHB 250.|
REHB 378
Sem for COOP 377 & REHB 295
This required companion course to COOP 377 and/or REHB 295 enables students to have the opportunity to discuss their field experiences in a structured seminar setting, providing them with the opportunity to better understand and integrate agency acti,vities such as assessment, treatment planning, team meetings, case management, and therapeutic interventions. In addition, the students will be able to discuss and appreciate agency policies, procedures and interpersonal communication. Prerequisite,: REHB 126, SPED 245, REHB 250.|
REHB 405
Substance Abuse
Participants study the physiological and psychosocial implication of drug or alcohol abuse, over-medication, and drug dependence, emphasizing intervention, advocacy, treatment, and prevention. Fall Semester.|
REHB 410
Prev & Trmt Stg Sub Abus
Participants engage in the study of societal pressures, attempts to prevent substance abuse, and treatment strategies along with the comparative analysis of efficacy. Prerequisite: REHB 405. Spring Semester.|
REHB 424
Field Exp In Rehb Sci
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REHB 430
Aging & The Human Services
This course will provide information related to older adult care management from the framework of human services systems. Concepts of client triage, assessment, planning, and brokering will be reviewed within the context of identifying problems asso,ciated with aging, identifying components of human services delivery systems, and case management skill development. Prerequisite: REHB 250.|
REHB 440
Prin of Psychiatric Rehb & Rec
This course introduces students to the principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery. Inherent in this philosophy is the belief that every individual has the capacity for recovery and that desirable treatment systems build upon strengths and, encourage and support the involvement of persons in normative community living, learning and working situations. Prerequisite: REHB 126 and REHB 250.|
REHB 460
Models Of Hum Ser System
Analyzes the purposes, structure, and context of the entire network of human services delivery models in Pennsylvania with comparative reference to selected models outside of Pennsylvania. Prerequisite: REHB 227 and SPED 230. Fall, annually.|
REHB 465
Assessment
|
REHB 470
Interven Strat Hum Serv & Rehb
This course features a practical hands-on approach to intervention and treatment with a variety of specific populations. Target groups include people with developmental disabilities, mental health and chemical dependency disorders, as well as the tre,atment of aging and adolescent populations. The course covers fundamental issues, knowledge and the practical application of applied strategies and techniques, including the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of therapeutic treatment plans.,Prerequisite: REHB 126, 250 and 370.|
REHB 475
Admin Rehb Deliv Systems
A study of the business and personnel aspects of functioning in and managing human service delivery systems. Examines organizing, operating, and managing human service systems relative to legal, economic, and personnel standards and practices. Prepar,es students to interact with legal, financial, and business experts in the operation and development of rehabilitation services. Prerequisite: REHB 460. Spring, annually.|
REHB 495
Fld Exp In Rehab Sci
A full-time, semester-long supervised experience that includes professional development experiences in community residential programs, vocational rehabilitation services, and MH/MR Base Service Units or similar social services. Prerequisites: REHB 46,0, 470, and 475. Each semester.|
REHB 496
Seminar For Rehb 495
This course will enable students involved in the REHB 495 Field Experience to have bi-weekly peer contact to assure that the qualitative experience involving knowledge and values are being appropriately integrated by the students. This type of semin,ar course is required by the Council for Standards in Human Service Education for students involved in fieldwork involving direct exposure to human service agencies and clients. It is designed to complement and enhance the supervised field experienc,e. Prerequisite: REHB 460, 475, 470.|
REHB 510
Group Processes In Rehab
Participants engage in the study of group development, dynamics, theory, leadership styles, participant roles, techniques, and evaluation of effectiveness as applied to rehabilitative services contexts.|
REHB 519
Stat Appl for Behavioral Sci
This course provides the statistical background necessary for research design and evaluation. Topics covered include scaling of data, descriptive statistics, probability, and statistical inference. Students will become familiar with statistical tec,hniques including correlations, chi-square, t-tests, analysis of variance, and simple regression. Students learn to compute statistics by hand and with the use of statistical software and web-applications.|
REHB 520
Research In Rehab Sciences
This course provides the essential knowledge and skills required to be both critical consumers and producers or research in rehabilitative sciences. Students are introduced to all phases of quantitative and qualitative research design, analysis, and, evaluation. Applicable ethical standards of practice as specified by the Council on Rehabilitation Education are emphasized throughout.|
REHB 530
Aging & The Human Services
This course will provide information related to older adult care management from the framework of human services systems. Concepts of client triage, assessment, planning, and brokering will be reviewed within the context of identifying problems asso,ciated with aging, identifying components of human services delivery systems, and case management skill development. Prerequisite: REHB 250.|
REHB 531
Impact Of Disabling Conditions
The impact of developmental disabilities as reflected in the function of individuals will be described. The course covers prenatal, perinatal, and postnatal concerns, as well as various physical disabilities, disabilities of aging, and interventions,. Prerequisite: Enrollment in Graduate Program|
REHB 537
Lifestyle & Career Devel
Participants engage in the analysis of economic, social, and psychological factors which define the context of educational, vocational, and personal decision-making; decision-making related to vocational development; the role of information in facili,tating decision-making; and the varieties of information, resources, and types of access available.|
REHB 538
Crisis Intervention In Rehb
This course provides professionals with information and skills to effectively assess and intervene in crisis situations involving clients, families, organizations and communities. Biannually|
REHB 540
Prin of Psychiatric Rehb & Rec
This course introduces students to the principles of psychiatric rehabilitation and recovery. Inherent in this philosophy is the belief that every individual has the capacity for recovery and that desirable treatment systems build upon strengths and, encourage and support the involvement of persons in normative community living, learning and working situations. Prerequisite: REHB 126 and REHB 250.|
REHB 545
Rehabilitation-Phil & Prin
Participants engage in the analysis of the values, assumptions, and the principles underlying theories of rehabilitation and their relation to the goals and objectives of rehabilitation programs.|
REHB 550
Issues In Rural Human Services
This course explores the field of human services delivery and behavioral health care issues in rural environments including mental health care, gerontology, substance abuse, education, vocational rehabilitation, disability, poverty, and the criminal,justice system. The course encompasses the various definitions of rural, diversity of rural communities, the common challenges faced and the professional skills needed by rural practitioners.|
REHB 560
Models Of Human Serv
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REHB 565
Sem In Rehb Serv Del Sys
Participants explore the continuum of human service delivery systems, with special focus on aging, mental retardation, and substance abuse. History and student professional experiences are considered in addition to current information and trends to i,dentify problems and opportunities for making systems more responsive to consumer needs.|
REHB 567
Sem Adv App Beh Analysis
This seminar examines contemporary theory, research, and practice in applied behavior analysis with particular emphasis given to applications in the fields of special education and rehabilitative sciences.|
REHB 570
Assess & Interven Stratg
Features a practical hands-on approach to assessment and intervention with a variety of specific populations. Target groups include people with mental retardation, mental disorders, and chemical dependency, as well as aging and adolescent populations,. Covers fundamental issues, applied strategies, and assessment techniques leading to the formulation, implementation, and evaluation of therapeutic treatment plans. Prerequisite: REHB 460.|
REHB 575
Admin Rehb Deliv Systems
Participants engage in the study of the business and personnel aspects of functioning in and managing human service delivery systems, including organization, operations, and management relative to legal, economic, and personnel standards and practice,.|
REHB 580
Interv Strat In Rehab Sc
Participants review and practice a variety of common clinical intervention techniques used by professionals in mental retardation, gerontological, and substance abuse treatment. These include creative and expressive techniques (e.g., art, music, dram,a, recreation, horticulture), behavioral interventions (e.g., relaxation, systematic desensitization, contracts), and didactic group and individual work.|
REHB 581
Rehab Pers Living w/ Hiv/Aids
The course provides an overview of rehabilitation issues involved in working with people living with HIV/AIDS. Topics will include an overview of the medical aspects of the virus. Special emphasis will be placed on issues of rehabilitation, includi,ng mental health, substance abuse, support networks, social relationships, and employment.|
REHB 585
Spec Topics In Rehab Science
Study of topical material reflecting new ideas, knowledge, or methods relevant to Rehabilitative Sciences. Course content will vary from semester to semester. Topics will be announced in advance.|
REHB 586
Dual Diagnosis
The course provides an overview of clinical issues involved in working with clients who suffer from co-morbid substance use and major psychiatric disorders. Topics include assessment, counseling, prevalence, health care policy, and social stigma.|
REHB 590
Special Projects
Participants engage in either scholarly or applied research related to rehabilitative sciences under the supervision of a faculty member. By permission only.|